34 Works

Data from: Plant species richness negatively affects root decomposition in grasslands

Hongmei Chen, Liesje Mommer, Jasper Van Ruijven, Hans De Kroon, Christine Fischer, Arthur Gessler, Anke Hildebrandt, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Christian Wirth & Alexandra Weigelt
Plant diversity enhances many ecosystem functions, including root biomass production, which drives soil carbon input. Although root decomposition accounts for a large proportion of carbon input for soil, little is known about plant diversity effect on this process. Plant diversity may affect root decomposition in two non-exclusive ways: by providing roots of different substrate quality (e.g. root chemistry) and/or by altering the soil environment (e.g. microclimate). To disentangle these two pathways, we conducted three decomposition...

Data from: Tree mortality across biomes is promoted by drought intensity, lower wood density and higher specific leaf area

Sarah Greenwood, Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Jordi Martínez-Vilalta, Francisco Lloret, Thomas Kitzberger, Craig D. Allen, Rod Fensham, Daniel C. Laughlin, Jens Kattge, Gerhard Bonisch, Nathan J. B. Kraft & Alistair S. Jump
Drought events are increasing globally, and reports of consequent forest mortality are widespread. However, due to a lack of a quantitative global synthesis, it is still not clear whether drought-induced mortality rates differ among global biomes and whether functional traits influence the risk of drought-induced mortality. To address these uncertainties, we performed a global meta-analysis of 58 studies of drought-induced forest mortality. Mortality rates were modelled as a function of drought, temperature, biomes, phylogenetic and...

Data from: Land use in mountain grasslands alters drought response and recovery of carbon allocation and plant-microbial interactions

Stefan Karlowsky, Angela Augusti, Johannes Ingrisch, Roland Hasibeder, Markus Lange, Sandra Lavorel, Michael Bahn & Gerd Gleixner
1. Mountain grasslands have recently been exposed to substantial changes in land-use and climate and in the near future will likely face an increased frequency of extreme droughts. To date is not known how the drought responses of carbon (C) allocation, a key process in the C cycle, are affected by land-use changes in mountain grassland. 2. We performed an experimental summer drought on an abandoned grassland and a traditionally managed hay meadow and traced...

Data from: Taxonomic and functional turnover are decoupled in European peat bogs

Bjorn J. M. Robroek, Vincent E. J. Jassey, Richard J. Payne, Magalí Martí, Luca Bragazza, Albert Bleeker, Alexandre Buttler, Simon J. M. Caporn, Nancy B. Dise, Jens Kattge, Katarzyna Zając, Bo H. Svensson, Jasper Van Ruijven & Jos T. A. Verhoeven
In peatland ecosystems, plant communities mediate a globally significant carbon store. The effects of global environmental change on plant assemblages are expected to be a factor in determining how ecosystem functions such as carbon uptake will respond. Using vegetation data from 56 Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs across Europe, we show that in these ecosystems plant species aggregate into two major clusters that are each defined by shared response to environmental conditions. Across environmental gradients, we find...

Data from: Facilitation by leguminous shrubs increases along a precipitation gradient

Hai-Yang Zhang, Xiao-Tao Lü, Alan K. Knapp, Henrik Hartmann, Edith Bai, Xiao-Bo Wang, Zheng-Wen Wang, Xiao-Guang Wang, Qiang Yu & Xing-Guo Han
Combining nutrient dynamics (plant nutrient uptake and soil fertility) can help uncover mechanisms of shrub-grass interactions and assess the validity of the stress-gradient hypothesis, which predicts that facilitation between plants increases in stressful environments. However, how facilitation via shrub-mediated nutrient increases varies with precipitation is poorly resolved. We first synthesized a global dataset from 66 studies and evaluated how shrubs affected soil organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in grasslands along a precipitation gradient. We...

Data from: Fire, fragmentation, and windstorms: a recipe for tropical forest degradation

Divino V. Silvério, Paulo M. Brando, Mercedes M.C. Bustamante, Francis E. Putz, Daniel Magnabosco Marra, Shaun R. Levick & Susan E. Trumbore
1. Widespread degradation of tropical forests is caused by a variety of disturbances that interact in ways that are not well understood. 2. To explore potential synergies between edge effects, fire and windstorm damage as causes of Amazonian forest degradation, we quantified vegetation responses to a 30-minute high-intensity windstorm that in 2012, swept through a large-scale fire experiment that borders an agricultural field. Our pre- and post-windstorm measurements include tree mortality rates and modes of...

Data from: A unified framework for quantifying land carbon sequestration

Yiqi Luo, Yuanyuan Huang, Carlos Sierra & Jianyang Xia
Land ecosystems offer an effective nature-based solution to climate change mitigation by absorbing approximately 30% of anthropically emitted carbon. This absorption is primarily based on constraints from atmospheric and oceanic measurements while quantification from direct studies of the land carbon cycle itself displays great uncertainty. The latter hinders prediction of the future fate of the land carbon sink. Here, we show a unified framework for quantifying land carbon sequestration. The framework unifies all carbon cycle...

Canopy structure change throughout a growing season in Trait-Based Experiment in 2014

Claudia Guimarães-Steinicke & Christian Wirth

Data associated with: Emergence of the physiological effects of elevated CO2 on land-atmosphere exchange of carbon and water

Chunhui Zhan, René Orth, Mirco Migliavacca, Sönke Zaehle, Markus Reichstein, Jan Engel, Anja Rammig & Alexander Winkler
Elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) influences the carbon assimilation rate and stomatal conductance of plants and thereby can affect the global cycles of carbon and water. Yet, the detection of these physiological effects of eCO2 in observational data remains challenging, because natural variations and confounding factors (e.g., warming) can overshadow the eCO2 effects in observational data of real-world ecosystems. In this study, we aim at developing a method to detect the emergence of the physiological CO2...

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