7 Works

Data from: Do cryptic species matter in macroecology? Sequencing European groundwater crustaceans yields smaller ranges but does not challenge biodiversity determinants

David Eme, Maja Zagmajster, Teo Delić, Cene Fiser, Jean-François Flot, Lara Konecny-Dupré, Snaebjorn Palsson, Fabio Stoch, Valerija Zakšek, Christophe J. Douady & Florian Malard
Ecologists increasingly rely on molecular delimitation methods (MMs) to identify species boundaries, thereby potentially increasing the number of putative species because of the presence of morphologically cryptic species. It has been argued that cryptic species could challenge our understanding of what determine large-scale biodiversity patterns which have traditionally been documented from morphology alone. Here, we used morphology and three MMs to derive four different sets of putative species among the European groundwater crustaceans. Then, we...

Data from: Decoupled responses of soil bacteria and their invertebrate consumer to warming, but not freeze-thaw cycles, in the Antarctic Dry Valleys

Matthew A. Knox, Walter S. Andriuzzi, Heather N. Buelow, Cristina Takacs-Vesbach, Byron J. Adams & Diana H. Wall
Altered temperature profiles resulting in increased warming and freeze–thaw cycle (FTC) frequency pose great ecological challenges to organisms in alpine and polar ecosystems. We performed a laboratory microcosm experiment to investigate how temperature variability affects soil bacterial cell numbers, and abundance and traits of soil microfauna (the microbivorous nematode Scottnema lindsayae) from McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. FTCs and constant freezing shifted nematode body size distribution towards large individuals, driven by higher mortality among smaller individuals....

Data from: Species identity and depth predict bleaching severity in reef building corals: shall the deep inherit the reef?

Paul R. Muir, Paul A. Marshall, Ameer Abdulla & J. David Aguirre
Mass bleaching associated with unusually high sea temperatures represents one of the greatest threats to corals and coral reef ecosystems. Deeper reef areas are hypothesized as potential refugia, but the susceptibility of Scleractinian species over depth has not been quantified. During the most severe bleaching event on record, we found up to 83% of coral cover severely affected on Maldivian reefs at a depth of 3–5 m, but significantly reduced effects at 24–30 m. Analysis...

Data from: Explaining large mitochondrial sequence differences within a population sample

Mary Morgan-Richards, Mariana Bulgarella, Louisa Sivyer, Edwina J. Dowle, Marie Hale, Rachael Van Heugten, Natasha E. McKean & Steven A. Trewick
Mitochondrial DNA sequence is frequently used to infer species' boundaries, as divergence is relatively rapid when populations are reproductively isolated. However, the shared history of a non-recombining gene naturally leads to correlation of pairwise differences, resulting in mtDNA clusters that might be mistaken for evidence of multiple species. There are four distinct processes that can explain high levels of mtDNA sequence difference within a single sample. Here, we examine one case in detail as an...

Data from: Subtle individual variation in indeterminate growth leads to major variation in survival and lifetime reproductive output in a long-lived reptile

Doug P. Armstrong, Matthew G. Keevil, Njal Rollinson & Ronald J. Brooks
1. The consequences of individual variation in life-history traits have been well studied due to their importance in evolutionary ecology. However, a trait that has received little empirical attention is the rate of indeterminate growth. In long-lived ectotherms, subtle variation in growth after maturity could have major effects over the animals’ lifetimes. 2. These effects are difficult to measure due to the challenges involved in reliably estimating individual variation in the face of environmental stochasticity,...

Data from: Temperate marine protected area provides recruitment subsidies to local fisheries

Agnes Le Port, John C. Montgomery, Adam N.H. Smith, Adrian E. Croucher, Ian M. McLeod, Shane D. Lavery & A. N. H. Smith
The utility of marine protected areas (MPAs) as a means of protecting exploited species and conserving biodiversity within MPA boundaries is supported by strong empirical evidence. However, the potential contribution of MPAs to fished populations beyond their boundaries is still highly controversial; empirical measures are scarce and modelling studies have produced a range of predictions, including both positive and negative effects. Using a combination of genetic parentage and relatedness analysis, we measured larval subsidies to...

Data from: Closing the gap: avian lineage splits at a young, narrow seaway imply a protracted history of mixed population response

Steven A. Trewick, Stephen Pilkington, Lara D. Shepherd, Gillian C. Gibb, Mary Morgan-Richards & Steve A. Trewick
The evolutionary significance of spatial habitat gaps has been well recognized since Alfred Russel Wallace compared the faunas of Bali and Lombok. Gaps between islands influence population structuring of some species, and flightless birds are expected to show strong partitioning even where habitat gaps are narrow. We examined the population structure of the most numerous living flightless land bird in New Zealand, Weka (Gallirallus australis). We surveyed Weka and their feather lice in native and...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • Massey University
    7
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • University of Iceland
    1
  • University of Guelph
    1
  • University of Lyon System
    1
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    1
  • Queensland Museum
    1
  • University of Auckland
    1
  • University of Toronto
    1