6 Works

Data from: Combining data‐derived priors with postrelease monitoring data to predict persistence of reintroduced populations

Faline M. Drummond, Tim G. Lovegrove & Doug P. Armstrong
Monitoring is an essential part of reintroduction programs, but many years of data may be needed to obtain reliable population projections. This duration can potentially be reduced by incorporating prior information on expected vital rates (survival and fecundity) when making inferences from monitoring data. The prior distributions for these parameters can be derived from data for previous reintroductions, but it is important to account for site‐to‐site variation. We evaluated whether such informative priors improved our...

Data from: Nutrient-specific compensation for seasonal cold stress in a free-ranging temperate colobine monkey

Songtao Guo, Rong Hou, Paul A. Garber, David Raubenheimer, Nicoletta Righini, Weihong Ji, Ollie Jay, Shujun He, Fan Wu, Fangfang Li, Baoguo Li, Song-Tao Guo, Shu-Jun He, Fang-Fang Li, Bao-Guo Li & Wei-Hong Ji
1. Homeostatic responses of animals to environmentally-induced changes in nutrient requirements provide a powerful basis for predictive ecological models, and yet such responses are virtually unstudied in the wild. 2. We tested for macronutrient-specific compensatory feeding responses by free-ranging golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) inhabiting high altitude temperate forests where they experience a substantial difference in ambient temperature in cold winters vs. warmer springs. The monkeys had free access to natural foods throughout the year,...

Data from: Tuatara and a new morphometric dataset for Rhynchocephalia: comments on Herrera‐Flores et al

Felix Vaux, Mary Morgan-Richards, Elizabeth E. Daly & Steven A. Trewick
It has recently been suggested that a ‘living fossil’ can be identified because it is both morphologically conservative and exhibits a significantly slower rate of morphological evolution compared to related lineages (Herrera-Flores et al. 2017). As an exemplar, variation among known rhynchocephalians was investigated, and it was concluded that the New Zealand tuatara Sphenodon punctatus Gray, 1831 is a living fossil species (Herrera-Flores et al. 2017). In addition to the dubious biological meaning and basis...

Data from: Genetic structure and shell shape variation within a rocky shore whelk suggests both diverging and constraining selection with gene flow

Michael R. Gemmell, Steven A. Trewick, James S. Crampton, Felix Vaux, Simon F.K. Hills, Elizabeth E. Daly, Bruce A. Marshall, Alan G. Beu, Mary Morgan-Richards & Simon F K Hills
Variation in snail shell shape has provided evolutionary biologists with excellent material for the study of local adaptation to local environments. However, assuming shell shape variation is evidence of distinct lineages (species) may have led to taxonomic inflation within some gastropod lineages. Here we compare shell shape variation and genetic structure of two independent lineages of New Zealand rocky shore whelks in order to understand the process that lead to an unusual disjunct distribution. We...

Data from: Environmentally induced development costs underlie fitness tradeoffs

Gregory M. Walter, Melanie J. Wilkinson, J. David Aguirre, Mark W. Blows, Daniel Ortiz-Barrientos & Greg M. Walter
Local adaptation can lead to genotype‐by‐environment interactions, which can create fitness tradeoffs in alternative environments, and govern the distribution of biodiversity across geographic landscapes. Exploring the ecological circumstances that promote the evolution of fitness tradeoffs requires identifying how natural selection operates and during which ontogenetic stages natural selection is strongest. When organisms disperse to areas outside their natural range, tradeoffs might emerge when organisms struggle to reach key life history stages, or alternatively, die shortly...

Data from: Resolving the phylogenetic position of Darwin’s extinct ground sloth (Mylodon darwinii) using mitogenomic and nuclear exon data

Frédéric Delsuc, Melanie Kuch, Gillian C. Gibb, Jonathan Hughes, Paul Szpak, John Southon, Jacob Enk, Ana T. Duggan & Hendrik N. Poinar
Mylodon darwinii is the extinct giant ground sloth named after Charles Darwin, who first discovered its remains in South America. We have successfully obtained a high-quality mitochondrial genome at 99-fold coverage using an Illumina shotgun sequencing of a 12,880 year-old bone fragment from Mylodon Cave in Chile. Low level of DNA damage showed that this sample was exceptionally well preserved for an ancient sub-fossil, likely the result of the dry and cold conditions prevailing within...

Registration Year

  • 2018
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  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Massey University
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  • University of Queensland
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  • Northwest University
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  • Northwest University
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  • McMaster University
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  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
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  • University of Sydney
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  • GNS Science
    1
  • Trent University
    1
  • Victoria University
    1