709 Works

Life history evolution, species differences and phenotypic plasticity in hemiparasitic eyebrights (Euphrasia)

Max Brown, Natacha Frachon, Edgar Wong & Alex Twyford
Premise of the study: Species delimitation in parasitic organisms is challenging as traits used in the identification of species are often plastic and vary depending on the host. Here, we use species from a recent radiation of generalist hemiparasitic Euphrasia to investigate trait variation and trait plasticity. We test whether Euphrasia species show reliable trait differences, investigate whether these differences correspond to life history trade-offs between growth and reproduction, and quantify plasticity in response to...

Coronavirus prevalence in Brazilian Amazon and Sao Paulo city

Tassila Salomon, Oliver Pybus, Rafael França, Marcia Castro, Ester Cerdeira Sabino, Christopher Dye, Michael Busch, Moritz U. G. Kraemer, Charles Whittaker, Andreza Santos, Nuno Faria, Rafael Pereira, Lewis Buss, , Claudia Abrahim, Maria Carvalho, Allyson Costa, Manoel Barral-Netto, Crispim Myuki, Brian Custer, Cesar De Almeida-Neto, Suzete Ferreira, Nelson Fraiji, Susie Gurzenda, Leonardo Kamaura … & Maria Belotti
SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly in the Brazilian Amazon. Mortality was elevated, despite the young population, with the health services and cemeteries overwhelmed. The attack rate in this region is an estimate of the final epidemic size in an unmitigated epidemic. Here we show that by June, one month after the epidemic peak in Manaus, capital of the Amazonas state, 44% of the population had detectable IgG antibodies. This equates to a cumulative incidence of 52% after...

Fatal outcome of chikungunya virus infection in Brazil

William Marciel Souza, Shirlene Telmos Silva De Lima, John Washington Cavalcante, Darlan Da Silva Candido, Marcilio Jorge Fumagalli, Jean-Paul Carrera, Leda Maria Simões Mello, Fernanda Montenegro De Carvalho Araújo, Izabel Letícia Cavalcante Ramalho, Francisca Kalline De Almeida Barreto, Deborah Nunes De Melo Braga, Adriana Rocha Simião, Mayara Jane Miranda Da Silva, Rhaquel De Morais Alves Barbosa Oliveira, Clayton Pereira Silva Lima, Camila De Sousa Lins, Rafael Ribeiro Barata, Marcelo Nunes Pereira Melo, Michel Platini Caldas De Souza, Luciano Monteiro Franco, Fábio Rocha Fernandes Távora, Daniele Rocha Queiroz Lemos, Carlos Henrique Morais De Alencar, Ronaldo De Jesus, Vagner De Souza Fonseca … & Fabio Miyajima
Abstract Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) emerged in the Americas in 2013 and has caused ~2.1 million cases and over 600 deaths. A retrospective investigation was undertaken to describe clinical, epidemiological and virus genomic features associated with deaths caused by CHIKV in Ceará state, northeast Brazil. Methods Sera, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and tissue samples from 100 fatal cases with suspected arbovirus infection were tested for CHIKV, dengue (DENV) and Zika virus (ZIKV). Clinical, epidemiological and death...

SARS-CoV-2 non-pharmaceutical interventions in Brazilian municipalities

Andreza Aruska De Souza Santos, Darlan Da Silva Cândido, William Marciel De Souza, Lewis Buss, Sabrina Li, Rafael H. M. Pereira, Chieh-Hsi Wu, Ester Sabino & Nuno R. Faria
Brazil has one of the fastest-growing COVID-19 epidemics worldwide. Non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) have been adopted on a municipal level, with asynchronous actions taken across 5,568 municipalities and the Federal District. This paper addresses this complexity reporting on a novel dataset with survey responses from 4,027 mayors, 72.3% of the total municipalities in the country. This dataset responds to the urgency to track and share findings on fragmented policies to tackle health crises like the COVID-19...

Consistent concentrations of critically endangered Balearic shearwaters in UK waters revealed by at-sea surveys

Jessica Ann Phillips, Alex N. Banks, Mark Bolton, Tom Brereton, Pierre Cazenave, Natasha Gillies, Oliver Padget, Jeroen Van Der Kooij, James Waggit & Tim Guilford
Aim: Europe’s only globally critically endangered seabird, the Balearic shearwater (Puffinus mauretanicus), is thought to have expanded its post-breeding range northwards into UK waters, though its distribution there is not yet well understood. This study aims to identify environmental factors associated with the species’ presence, and map the probability of presence of the species across the western English Channel and southern Celtic Sea, and estimate the number of individuals in this area. Location: The western...

Association of gray matter atrophy patterns with clinical phenotype and progression in multiple sclerosis

Maria A Rocca, Paola Valsasina, Alessandro Meani, Claudio Gobbi, Chiara Zecca, Alex Rovira, Jaume Sastre-Garriga, Hugh Kearney, Olga Ciccarelli, Lucy Matthews, Jacqueline Palace, Antonio Gallo, Alvino Bisecco, Carsten Lukas, Barbara Bellenberg, Frederik Barkhof, Hugo Vrenken, Paolo Preziosa & Massimo Filippi
Objectives. Grey matter (GM) involvement is clinically relevant in multiple sclerosis (MS). Using source-based morphometry (SBM), we characterized GM atrophy and its 1-year evolution across different MS phenotypes. Methods. Clinical and MRI data were obtained at 8 European sites from 170 healthy controls (HCs) and 398 MS patients (34 clinically isolated syndromes [CIS], 226 relapsing-remitting [RR], 95 secondary progressive [SP] and 43 primary progressive [PP] MS). Fifty-seven HC and 144 MS underwent 1-year follow-up. Baseline...

In vivo microbial coevolution favours host protection and plastic downregulation of immunity

Suzanne Ford & Kayla King
Microbiota can protect their hosts from infection. The short timescales in which microbes can evolve presents the possibility that ‘protective microbes’ can take-over from the immune system of longer-lived hosts in the coevolutionary race against pathogens. Here, we found that coevolution between a protective bacterium (Enterococcus faecalis) and a virulent pathogen (Staphylococcus aureus) within an animal population (Caenorhabditis elegans) resulted in more disease suppression than when the protective bacterium adapted to uninfected hosts. At the...

Association of specific biotypes in patients with Parkinson's disease and disease progression

Linbo Wang, Wei Cheng, Edmund T. Rolls, Fuli Dai, Weikang Gong, Jingnan Du, Wei Zhang, Shouyan Wang, Fengtao Liu, Jian Wang, Peter Brown & Jianfeng Feng
Objective To identify biotypes in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease patients and test whether these biotypes could explain inter-individual differences in longitudinal progression. Methods In this longitudinal analysis, we use a data-driven approach clustering PD patients from the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) (n = 314, age = 61.0 ± 9.5, 34.1% female, 5 years follow-up). Voxel-level neuroanatomical features were estimated using deformation-based morphometry (DBM) of T1-weighted MRI. Voxels whose deformation values were significantly correlated (P...

Data from: Environmental change, if unaccounted, prevents detection of cryptic evolution in a wild population

Tomos Potter, Ronald D. Bassar, Paul Bentzen, Emily W. Ruell, Julián Torres-Dowdall, Corey A. Handelsman, Cameron K. Ghalambor, Joseph Travis, David N. Reznick & Tim Coulson
Detecting contemporary evolution requires demonstrating that genetic change has occurred. Mixed-effects models allow estimation of quantitative genetic parameters and are widely used to study evolution in wild populations. However, predictions of evolution based on these parameters frequently fail to match observations. Furthermore, such studies often lack an independent measure of evolutionary change against which to verify predictions. Here, we applied three commonly used quantitative genetic approaches to predict the evolution of size at maturity in...

Data from: Space and rank: infants expect agents in higher position to be socially dominant

Xianwei Meng, Yo Nakawake, Hiroshi Nitta, Yusuke Moriguchi & Kazuhide Hashiya
Social hierarchies exist throughout the animal kingdom, including among humans. Our daily interactions inevitably reflect social dominance relationships between individuals. How do we mentally represent such concepts? Studies show that social dominance is represented as vertical space (i.e., high=dominant) by adults and preschool children, suggesting a space-dominance representational link in social cognition. However, little is known about its early development. Here, we present experimental evidence that 12- to 16-month-old infants expect agents presented in a...

Multiple phenotypes conferred by a single insect symbiont are independent

Ailsa McLean, Jan Hrček, Benjamin Parker, Hugo Mathé-Hubert, Heidi Kaech, Chantal Paine & Charles Godfray
Many microbial symbionts have multiple phenotypic consequences for their animal hosts. However, the ways in which different symbiont-mediated phenotypes combine to affect fitness are not well understood. We investigated whether there are correlations between different symbiont-mediated phenotypes. We used the symbiont Spiroplasma, a striking example of a bacterial symbiont conferring diverse phenotypes on insect hosts. We took 11 strains of Spiroplasma infecting pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) and assessed their ability to provide protection against the...

Data from: Detecting the population dynamics of an autosomal sex-ratio distorter transgene in malaria vector mosquitoes

Paola Pollegioni, Ace North, Tania Persampieri, Alessandro Bucci, Roxana Minuz, David Alexander Groneberg, Tony Nolan, Philippos-Aris Papathanos, Andrea Crisanti & Ruth Muller
1. The development of genetically modified mosquitoes and their subsequent field release offers innovative and cost-effective approaches to reduce mosquito-borne diseases, such as malaria. A sex-distorting autosomal transgene has been developed recently in G3 mosquitoes, a lab strain of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae s.l. The transgene expresses an endonuclease called I-PpoI during spermatogenesis, which selectively cleaves the X chromosome to result in ~95% male progeny. Following the World Health Organization Guidance Framework for the...

Data from: Neighbouring-group composition and within-group relatedness drive extra-group paternity rate in the European badger (Meles meles)

Geetha Annavi, Chris Newman, Hannah L. Dugdale, Christina C. Buesching, Yung W. Sin, Terry Burke & David W. Macdonald
Extra-group paternity (EGP) occurs commonly among group-living mammals and plays an important role in mating systems and the dynamics of sexual selection; however, socio-ecological and genetic correlates of EGP have been underexplored. We use 23 years of demographic and genetic data from a high-density European badger (Meles meles) population, to investigate the relationship between the rate of EGP in litters and mate availability, mate incompatibility and mate quality (heterozygosity). Relatedness between within-group assigned mothers and...

Data from: MHC class II assortative mate choice in European badgers (Meles meles)

Yung Wa Sin, Geetha Annavi, Chris Newman, Christina Buesching, Terry Burke, David W. Macdonald & Hannah L. Dugdale
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a crucial role in the immune system, and in some species, it is a target by which individuals choose mates to optimize the fitness of their offspring, potentially mediated by olfactory cues. Under the genetic compatibility hypothesis, individuals are predicted to choose mates with compatible MHC alleles, to increase the fitness of their offspring. Studies of MHC-based mate choice in wild mammals are under-represented currently, and few investigate more...

Data from: Evolution of paternal care in diploid and haplodiploid populations

Nicholas G. Davies & Andy Gardner
W. D. Hamilton famously suggested that the inflated relatedness of full sisters under haplodiploidy explains why all workers in the social hymenoptera are female. This suggestion has not stood up to further theoretical scrutiny and is not empirically supported. Rather, it appears that altruistic sib-rearing in the social hymenoptera is performed exclusively by females because this behaviour has its origins in parental care, which was performed exclusively by females in the ancestors of this insect...

Data from: Population-level effects of fitness costs associated with repressible female-lethal transgene insertions in two pest insects

Tim Harvey-Samuel, Thomas Ant, Neil Morrison, Hongfei Gong & Luke Alphey
Genetic control strategies offer great potential for the sustainable and effective control of insect pests. These strategies involve the field release of transgenic insects with the aim of introducing engineered alleles into wild populations, either permanently or transiently. Their efficacy can therefore be reduced if transgene-associated fitness costs reduce the relative performance of released insects. We describe a method of measuring the fitness costs associated with transgenes by analyzing their evolutionary trajectories when placed in...

Data from: Diet quality in a wild grazer declines under the threat of an ambush predator

Florian Barnier, Marion Valeix, Patrick Duncan, Simon Chamaillé-Jammes, Philippe Barre, Andrew J. Loveridge, David W. Macdonald, Hervé Fritz & S. Chamaille-Jammes
Predators influence prey populations not only through predation itself, but also indirectly through prompting changes in prey behaviour. The behavioural adjustments of prey to predation risk may carry nutritional costs, but this has seldom been studied in the wild in large mammals. Here, we studied the effects of an ambush predator, the African lion (Panthera leo), on the diet quality of plains zebras (Equus quagga) in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe. We combined information on movements...

Data from: Colour in a new light: a spectral perspective on the quantitative genetics of carotenoid coloration

Simon R. Evans & Ben C. Sheldon
1. Carotenoid-based colours are model traits for research on animal signalling and sexual selection but, whereas the consequences of variable expression have been extensively studied, its causes are rarely quantified. This issue is complicated by the composite nature of carotenoid-based colour patches, which combine pigments and a reflective background. Ultimately, the evolution of such colours will be determined by the processes that govern variable expression of these mechanisms. 2. We present a novel approach to...

Data from: A framework for detecting natural selection on traits above the species level

Kenneth B. Hoehn, Paul G. Harnik & V. Louise Roth
To what extent can natural selection act on groupings above the species level? Despite extensive theoretical discussion and growing practical concerns over increased rates of global ecological turnover, the question has largely evaded empirical resolution. A flexible and robust hypothesis-testing framework for detecting the phenomenon could facilitate significant progress in resolving this issue. We introduce a permutation-based approach, implemented in the R package perspectev, which provides an explicit test of whether empirical patterns of correlation...

Data from: Rapid host switching in generalist Campylobacter strains erodes the signal for tracing human infections

Bethany L. Dearlove, Alison J. Cody, Ben Pascoe, Guillaume Méric, Daniel J. Wilson & Samuel K. Sheppard
Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the biggest causes of bacterial gastroenteritis in the developed world, with human infections typically arising from zoonotic transmission associated with infected meat. Because Campylobacter is not thought to survive well outside the gut, host-associated populations are genetically isolated to varying degrees. Therefore, the likely origin of most strains can be determined by host-associated variation in the genome. This is instructive for characterizing the source of human infection. However, some...

Data from: Reactive responses of zebras to lion encounters shape their predator-prey space game at large scale

Nicolas Courbin, Andrew J. Loveridge, David W. Macdonald, Hervé Fritz, Marion Valeix, Edwin T. Makuwe & Simon Chamaillé-Jammes
The predator–prey space game and the costs associated with risk effects are affected by prey 1) proactive adjustments (when prey modify their behaviour in response to an a priori assessment of the risk level) and 2) reactive adjustments (when prey have detected an immediate threat). Proactive adjustments are generally well-studied, whereas the frequency, strength and duration of reactive adjustments remain largely unknown. We studied the space use and habitat selection of GPS-collared zebras Equus quagga...

Data from: A life-cycle model of human social groups produces a u-shaped distribution in group size

Gul Deniz Salali, Harvey Whitehouse & Michael E. Hochberg
One of the central puzzles in the study of sociocultural evolution is how and why transitions from small-scale human groups to large-scale, hierarchically more complex ones occurred. Here we develop a spatially explicit agent-based model as a first step towards understanding the ecological dynamics of small and large-scale human groups. By analogy with the interactions between single-celled and multicellular organisms, we build a theory of group lifecycles as an emergent property of single cell demographic...

Data from: Multi-serotype pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage prevalence in vaccine naïve Nepalese children, assessed using molecular serotyping.

Rama Kandasamy, Meeru Gurung, Anushil Thapa, Susan Ndimah, Neelam Adhikari, David R. Murdoch, Dominic F. Kelly, Denise E. Waldron, Katherine A. Gould, Stephen Thorson, Shrijana Shrestha, Jason Hinds & Andrew J. Pollard
Invasive pneumococcal disease is one of the major causes of death in young children in resource poor countries. Nasopharyngeal carriage studies provide insight into the local prevalence of circulating pneumococcal serotypes. There are very few data on the concurrent carriage of multiple pneumococcal serotypes. This study aimed to identify the prevalence and serotype distribution of pneumococci carried in the nasopharynx of young healthy Nepalese children prior to the introduction of a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using...

Data from: The SOS response increases bacterial fitness, but not evolvability, under a sublethal dose of antibiotic

Clara Torres-Barceló, Mila Kojadinovic, Richard Moxon & Roderick Craig MacLean
Exposure to antibiotics induces the expression of mutagenic bacterial stress–response pathways, but the evolutionary benefits of these responses remain unclear. One possibility is that stress–response pathways provide a short-term advantage by protecting bacteria against the toxic effects of antibiotics. Second, it is possible that stress-induced mutagenesis provides a long-term advantage by accelerating the evolution of resistance. Here, we directly measure the contribution of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa SOS pathway to bacterial fitness and evolvability in the...

Data from: Asymmetric visual input and route recapitulation in homing pigeons

, Dora Biro, Tim Guilford, Anna Gagliardo, Alex Kacelnik & Antone Martinho
Pigeons (Columba livia) display reliable homing behaviour, but their homing routes from familiar release points are individually idiosyncratic and tightly recapitulated, suggesting that learning plays a role in route establishment. In light of the fact that routes are learned, and that both ascending and descending visual pathways share visual inputs from each eye asymmetrically to the brain hemispheres, we investigated how information from each eye contributes to route establishment, and how information input is shared...

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