43 Works

Mimetic host shifts in a social parasite of ants: Behavioural study

K. Schönrogge, J.A. Thomas, G.W. Elmes, M. Sielezniew, A. Stankiewicz-Fiedurek, D. Simcox & J. Settele
This dataset derives from cross-over experiments using ant worker rescue behaviour towards caterpillars of the socially parasitic butterfly from two host-ecotypes. The data comprise datasets collected from four 4 experiments 3 hours after testing and from 4 experiments 7 days later. They all include nest numbers, the order of retrieval ranked by the attention of nurse ants to the ant pupae, large larvae and small larvae and the adult Maculinea rebeli. The data give the...

Data from: Recent ecological selection on regulatory divergence is shaping clinal variation in Senecio on Mount Etna

Graham Muir, Owen G. Osborne, Jonas Sarasa, Simon J. Hiscock & Dmitry A. Filatov
The hybrid zone on Mount Etna (Sicily) between Senecio aethnensis and Senecio chrysanthemifolius (two morphologically and physiologically distinct species) is a classic example of an altitudinal cline. Hybridization at intermediate altitudes and gradients in phenotypic and life-history traits occur along altitudinal transects of the volcano. The cline is considered to be a good example of ecological selection with species differences arising by divergent selection opposing gene flow. However, the possibility that the cline formed from...

Data from: Dispersal in a patchy landscape reveals contrasting determinants of infection in a wild avian malaria system

Sarah C. L. Knowles, Matthew J. Wood, Ricardo Alves & Ben C. Sheldon
1. Understanding exactly when, where and how hosts become infected with parasites is critical to understanding host-parasite coevolution. However, for host-parasite systems in which hosts or parasites are mobile (for example vector-borne diseases), the spatial location of infection, and the relative importance of parasite exposure at successive host life-history stages, are often uncertain. 2. Here, using a six-year longitudinal dataset from a spatially referenced population of blue tits, we test the extent to which infection...

Data from: A giant pliosaurid skull from the Late Jurassic of England

Roger B. J. Benson, Mark Evans, Adam S. Smith, Judyth Sassoon, Scott Moore-Faye, Hilary F. Ketchum & Richard Forrest
Pliosaurids were a long-lived and cosmopolitan group of marine predators that spanned 110 million years and occupied the upper tiers of marine ecosystems from the Middle Jurassic until the early Late Cretaceous. A well-preserved giant pliosaurid skull from the Late Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation of Dorset, United Kingdom, represents a new species, Pliosaurus kevani. This specimen is described in detail, and the taxonomy and systematics of Late Jurassic pliosaurids is revised. We name two additional...

Data from: Genetic structure, spatial organization, and dispersal in two populations of bat-eared foxes

Jan F. Kamler, Melissa M. Gray, Annie Oh & David W. Macdonald
We incorporated radio-telemetry data with genetic analysis of bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis) from individuals in 32 different groups to examine relatedness and spatial organization in two populations in South Africa that differed in density, home-range sizes, and group sizes. Kin clustering occurred only for female dyads in the high-density population. Relatedness was negatively correlated with distance only for female dyads in the high-density population, and for male and mixed-sex dyads in the low-density population. Home-range...

Data from: Partitioning of genetic variation across the genome using multimarker methods in a wild bird population

Matthew R. Robinson, Anna W. Santure, Isabelle DeCauwer, Ben C. Sheldon & Jon Slate
The underlying basis of genetic variation in quantitative traits, in terms of the number of causal variants and the size of their effects, is largely unknown in natural populations. The expectation is that complex quantitative trait variation is attributable to many, possibly interacting, causal variants, whose effects may depend upon the sex, age and the environment in which they are expressed. A recently developed methodology in animal breeding derives a value of relatedness among individuals...

Data from: Long term impacts of selective logging on two Amazonian tree species with contrasting ecological and reproductive characteristics: inferences from Eco-gene model simulations

Christina C. Vinson, Milton Kanashiro, Alexandre M. Sebbenn, Thomas C. R. Williams, Stephen A. Harris & David H. Boshier
The impact of logging and subsequent recovery after logging is predicted to vary depending on specific life history traits of the logged species. The Eco-gene simulation model was used to evaluate the long-term impacts of selective logging over 300 years on two contrasting Brazilian Amazon tree species, Dipteryx odorata and Jacaranda copaia. D. odorata (Leguminosae), a slow growing climax tree, occurs at very low densities, whereas J. copaia (Bignoniaceae) is a fast growing pioneer tree...

Data from: Land-use intensity and the effects of organic farming on biodiversity: a hierarchical meta-analysis

Sean L. Tuck, Camilla Winqvist, Flávia Mota, Johan Ahnström, Lindsay A. Turnbull & Janne Bengtsson
The benefits of organic farming to biodiversity in agricultural landscapes continue to be hotly debated, emphasising the importance of precisely quantifying the effect of organic vs. conventional farming. We conducted an updated hierarchical meta-analysis of studies that compared biodiversity under organic and conventional farming methods, measured as species richness. We calculated effect sizes for 184 observations garnered from 94 studies, and for each study we obtained three standardised measures reflecting land-use intensity. We investigated the...

Data from: Evolutionary origin of the Scombridae (tunas and mackerels): members of a Paleogene adaptive radiation with 14 other pelagic fish families

Masaki Miya, Matt Friedman, Takashi P. Satoh, Hirohiko Takeshima, Tetsuya Sado, Wataru Iwasaki, Yusuke Yamanoue, Masanori Nakatani, Kohji Mabuchi, Jun G. Inoue, Jan Yde Poulsen, Tsukasa Fukunaga, Yukuto Sato & Mutsumi Nishida
Uncertainties surrounding the evolutionary origin of the epipelagic fish family Scombridae (tunas and mackerels) are symptomatic of the difficulties in resolving suprafamilial relationships within Percomorpha, a hyperdiverse teleost radiation that contains approximately 17,000 species placed in 13 ill-defined orders and 269 families. Here we find that scombrids share a common ancestry with 14 families based on (i) bioinformatic analyses using partial mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences from all percomorphs deposited in GenBank (10,733 sequences) and...

Mimetic host shifts in a social parasite of ants: Analytical data of surface semio-chemicals on Maculinea rebeli larvae

K. Schönrogge, J.A. Thomas, G. W. Elmes, M. Sielezniew, A. Stankiewicz-Fiedurek, D. Simcox & J. Settele
This dataset is part of the study of mimetic host shifts in an endangered social parasite of ants, which is a joint study of the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and the University of Oxford. It contains the relative abundance data of cuticular hydrocarbons extracted from worker ants of Myrmica sabuleti and M. schencki, and from caterpillars of Maculinea rebeli from two populations at the pre-adoption stage and after being reared by the two ant...

Data from: Sex-specific patterns of morphological diversification: evolution of reaction norms and static allometries in neriid flies

Elizabeth J. Cassidy, Eleanor Bath, Stephen F. Chenoweth & Russell Bonduriansky
The consequences of sex-specific selection for patterns of diversification remain poorly known. Because male secondary sexual traits are typically costly to express, and both costs and benefits are likely to depend on ambient environment and individual condition, such traits may be expected to diversify via changes in reaction norms as well as the scaling of trait size with body size (static allometry). We investigated morphological diversification within two species of Australian neriid flies (Telostylinus angusticollis,...

Data from: The evolution of bacterial mutation rates under simultaneous selection by inter-specific and social parasitism

Siobhán O'Brien, Antonio M. M. Rodrigues & A. Buckling
Many bacterial populations harbour substantial numbers of hypermutable bacteria, in spite of hypermutation being associated with deleterious mutations. One reason for the persistence of hypermutators is the provision of novel mutations, enabling rapid adaptation to continually changing environments, for example coevolving virulent parasites. However, hypermutation also increases the rate at which intraspecific parasites (social cheats) are generated. Interspecific and intraspecific parasitism are therefore likely to impose conflicting selection pressure on mutation rate. Here, we combine...

Data from: Sex-specific responses to sexual familiarity, and the role of olfaction in Drosophila

Cedric K. W. Tan, Hanne Løvlie, Elisabeth Greenway, Stephen F. Goodwin, Tommaso Pizzari, Stuart Wigby & H. Lovlie
Studies of mating preferences have largely neglected the potential effects of individuals encountering their previous mates (‘directly sexually familiar’), or new mates that share similarities to previous mates, e.g. from the same family and/or environment (‘phenotypically sexually familiar’). Here, we show that male and female Drosophila melanogaster respond to the direct and phenotypic sexual familiarity of potential mates in fundamentally different ways. We exposed a single focal male or female to two potential partners. In...

Data from: Haplotype structure, adaptive history and associations with exploratory behaviour of the DRD4 gene region in four great tit (Parus major) populations

Jakob C. Mueller, Peter Korsten, Christine Hermannstädter, Thomas Feulner, Niels J. Dingemanse, Erik Matthysen, Kees Van Oers, Thijs Van Overveld, Samantha C. Patrick, John L. Quinn, Matthias Riemenschneider, Joost M. Tinbergen, Bart Kempenaers & Christine Hermannstaedter
The assessment of genetic architecture and selection history in genes for behavioural traits is fundamental to our understanding of how these traits evolve. The dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene is a prime candidate for explaining genetic variation in novelty seeking behaviour, a commonly assayed personality trait in animals. Previously we showed that a single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 3 of this gene is associated with exploratory behaviour in at least one of four Western European...

Data from: Cryptic female choice favours sperm from MHC-dissimilar males

Hanne Løvlie, Mark A. F. Gillingham, Kirsty Worley, Tommaso Pizzari, David S. Richardson & H. Lovlie
Cryptic female choice may enable polyandrous females to avoid inbreeding or bias offspring variability at key loci after mating. However, the role of these genetic benefits in cryptic female choice remains poorly understood. Female red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, bias sperm use in favour of unrelated males. Here, we experimentally investigate whether this bias is driven by relatedness per se, or by similarity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), genes central to vertebrate acquired immunity, where...

Data from: Genomic dissection of variation in clutch size and egg mass in a wild great tit (Parus major) population

Anna W. Santure, Isabelle De Cauwer, Jocelyn Poissant, Matthew R. Robinson, Jon Slate & Ben C. Sheldon
Clutch size and egg mass are life history traits that have been extensively studied in wild bird populations, as life history theory predicts a negative trade-off between them, either at the phenotypic or genetic level. Here, we analyse the genomic architecture of these heritable traits in a wild great tit (Parus major) population, using three marker-based approaches - chromosome partitioning, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and a genome-wide association study (GWAS). The variance explained by...

Data from: Genome-wide association study identifies vitamin B5 biosynthesis as a host specificity factor in Campylobacter

Samuel K. Sheppard, Xavier Didelot, Guillaume Meric, Alicia Torralbo, Keith A. Jolley, David J. Kelly, Stephen D. Bentley, Martin C. J. Maiden, Julian Parkhill & Daniel Falush
Genome-wide association studies have the potential to identify causal genetic factors underlying important phenotypes but have rarely been performed in bacteria. We present an association mapping method that takes into account the clonal population structure of bacteria and is applicable to both core and accessory genome variation. Campylobacter is a common cause of human gastroenteritis as a consequence of its proliferation in multiple farm animal species and its transmission via contaminated meat and poultry. We...

Data from: A new exceptionally preserved Cambrian priapulid from the Chengjiang Lagerstätte

Xiaoya Ma, Richard J. Aldridge, David J. Siveter, Derek J. Siveter, Xianguang Hou & Gregory D. Edgecombe
A fossil priapulid, Eximipriapulus globocaudatus new genus new species, is described from the Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte of Yunnan, China. The exceptional preservation of the animal reveals morphological details that allow direct comparison with extant priapulids. The body is divisible into a partially eversible pharynx, a smooth collar, a scalid-bearing introvert, a neck with triangular scalids, an unsegmented trunk with annulations, and a distinctly expanded terminal region. Several specialized regions of the alimentary canal are recognized:...

Data from: Evolutionary reversals of antibiotic resistance in experimental populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Danna R. Gifford & R. Craig MacLean
Antibiotic resistance mutations are accompanied by a fitness cost, and two mechanisms allow bacteria to adapt to this cost once antibiotic use is halted. First, it is possible for resistance to revert; second, it is possible for bacteria to adapt to the cost of resistance by compensatory mutations. Unfortunately, reversion to antibiotic sensitivity is rare, but the underlying factors that prevent reversion remain obscure. Here, we directly study the evolutionary dynamics of reversion by experimentally...

Data from: Dynamic social behaviour in a bacterium: Pseudomonas aeruginosa partially compensates for siderophore loss to cheats

Freya Harrison
Cooperation underlies diverse phenomena including the origins of multicellular life, human behaviour in economic markets and the mechanisms by which pathogenic bacteria cause disease. Experiments with microorganisms have advanced our understanding of how, when and why cooperation evolves, but the extent to which microbial cooperation can recapitulate aspects of animal behaviour is debated. For instance, understanding the evolution of behavioural response rules (how should one individual respond to another’s decision to cooperate or defect?) is...

Data from: Group formation, relatedness, and the evolution of multicellularity

Roberta M. Fisher, Charlie K. Cornwallis & Stuart A. West
The evolution of multicellular organisms represents one of approximately eight major evolutionary transitions that have occurred on earth. The major challenge raised by this transition is to explain why single cells should join together and become mutually dependent, in a way that leads to a more complex multicellular life form that can only replicate as a whole. It has been argued that a high genetic relatedness (r) between cells played a pivotal role in the...

Data from: The fourth dimension of tool use: temporally enduring artefacts aid primates learning to use tools

Dorothy M. Fragaszy, Dora Biro, Yonat Eshchar, Tatyana Humle, Patrícia Izar, Briseida Resende & Elisabetta Visalberghi
All investigated cases of habitual tool use in wild chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys include youngsters encountering durable artefacts, most often in a supportive social context. We propose that enduring artefacts associated with tool use, such as previously used tools, partly processed food items and residual material from previous activity, aid non-human primates to learn to use tools, and to develop expertise in their use, thus contributing to traditional technologies in non-humans. Therefore, social contributions to...

Data from: Homing pigeons respond to time-compensated solar cues even in sight of the loft

Chris Armstrong, Helen Wilkinson, Jessica Meade, Dora Biro, Robin Freeman & Tim Guilford
The sun has long been thought to guide bird navigation as the second step in a two-stage process, in which determining position using a map is followed by course setting using a compass, both over unfamiliar and familiar terrain. The animal’s endogenous clock time-compensates the solar compass for the sun’s apparent movement throughout the day, and this allows predictable deflections in orientation to test for the compass’ influence using clock-shift manipulations. To examine the influence...

Data from: Interaction rules underlying group decisions in homing pigeons

Benjamin Pettit, Andrea Perna, Dora Biro & David J. T. Sumpter
Travelling in groups gives animals opportunities to share route information by following cues from each other's movement. The outcome of group navigation will depend on how individuals respond to each other within a flock, school, swarm, or herd. Despite the abundance of modelling studies, only recently have researchers developed techniques to determine the interaction rules among real animals. Here we use high-resolution GPS (global positioning system) tracking to study these interactions in pairs of pigeons...

Data from: Molecular and fossil evidence place the origin of cichlid fishes long after Gondwanan rifting

Matt Friedman, Benjamin P. Keck, Alex Dornburg, Ron I. Eytan, Christopher H. Martin, C. Darrin Hulsey, Peter C. Wainwright & Thomas J. Near
Cichlid fishes are a key model system in the study of adaptive radiation, speciation and evolutionary developmental biology. More than 1600 cichlid species inhabit freshwater and marginal marine environments across several southern landmasses. This distributional pattern, combined with parallels between cichlid phylogeny and sequences of Mesozoic continental rifting, has led to the widely accepted hypothesis that cichlids are an ancient group whose major biogeographic patterns arose from Gondwanan vicariance. Although the Early Cretaceous (ca 135...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    43

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    43

Affiliations

  • University of Oxford
    43
  • University of Sheffield
    6
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    3
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    3
  • Yale University
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    2
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    2
  • Natural History Museum
    2