92 Works

Environmental conditions at saiga calving and die-off sites in Kazakhstan, 1979 to 2016

S. Robinson
This dataset describes environmental conditions at 135 Saiga antelope calving sites (from a total of 214) in Kazakhstan where the predictor variables required for the modelling were available at sufficient resolution. Data collected included climatic variables associated with haemorrhagic septicaemia in the literature, including humidity, temperature and precipitation. Indicators of vegetation biomass, phenology and length of the winter preceding calving were represented using the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), snow depth and snow presence data....

Data from: Evolutionary rates of mid-Permian tetrapods from South Africa and the role of temporal resolution in turnover reconstruction

Michael O. Day, Roger B.J. Benson, Christian F. Kammerer & Bruce S. Rubidge
The Main Karoo Basin of South Africa contains a near-continuous sequence of continental deposition spanning 45 million years from the middle Permian to the Early Jurassic. The terrestrial vertebrates of this sequence provide a high-resolution stratigraphic record of regional origination and extinction, especially for the middle–late Permian. Until now, data have only been surveyed at coarse stratigraphic resolution using methods that are biased by non-uniform sampling rates, limiting our understanding of the dynamics of diversification...

Data from: Comparative population genomics reveals key barriers to dispersal in Southern Ocean penguins

Gemma V. Clucas, Jane L. Younger, Damian Kao, Louise Emmerson, Colin Southwell, Barbara Wienecke, Alex D. Rogers, Charles-Andre Bost, Gary D. Miller, Michael J. Polito, Patrick Lelliot, Jonathan Handley, Sarah Crofts, Richard A. Phillips, Michael J. Dunn, Karen J. Miller, Tom Hart & Patrick Lelliott
The mechanisms that determine patterns of species dispersal are important factors in the production and maintenance of biodiversity. Understanding these mechanisms helps to forecast the responses of species to environmental change. Here we used a comparative framework and genome-wide data obtained through RAD-seq to compare the patterns of connectivity among breeding colonies for five penguin species with shared ancestry, overlapping distributions, and differing ecological niches, allowing an examination of the intrinsic and extrinsic barriers governing...

Data from: Distinguishing the victim from the threat: SNP‐based methods reveal the extent of introgressive hybridization between wildcats and domestic cats in Scotland and inform future in situ and ex situ management options for species restoration

Helen V. Senn, Muhammad Ghazali, Jennifer Kaden, David Barcaly, Ben Harrower, Ruairidh D. Campbell, David W. MacDonald, Andrew C. Kitchener & David Barclay
The degree of introgressive hybridisation between the Scottish wildcat and domestic cat has long been suspected to be advanced. Here we use a 35-SNP-marker test, designed to assess hybridisation between wildcat and domestic cat populations in Scotland, to assess a database of 265 wild-living and captive cat samples, and test the assumptions of the test using 3097 SNP markers generated independently in a subset of the data using ddRAD. We discovered that despite increased genetic...

Data from: Despite high levels of expression in thymic epithelial cells, miR-181a1 and miR-181b1 are not required for thymic development

Heather E. Stefanski, Yan Xing, Patricia A. Taylor, Stefano Maio, Jorge Henao-Meija, Adam Williams, Richard A. Flavell, Georg A. Hollander & Bruce R. Blazar
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be key modulators of post-transcriptional gene silencing in many cellular processes. In previous studies designed to understand the role of miRNAs in thymic development, we globally deleted miRNA exclusively in thymic epithelial cells (TECs), which are critical in thymic selection. This resulted in the loss of stromal cells that instruct T cell lineage commitment and affect thymocyte positive selection, required for mature T cell development. Since murine miR-181 is...

Data from: Spatial, temporal and individual-based differences in nest-site visits and subsequent reproductive success in wild great tits

Joshua A. Firth, Brecht L. Verhelst, Ross A. Crates, Colin J. Garroway, Ben C. Sheldon & Josh A. Firth
The behaviour of individual birds before and during the breeding period may be an important factor determining reproductive success. One commonly observed behaviour during the breeding period in many species is the visitation of multiple potential breeding sites. Much research has attempted to determine the function and consequences of this behaviour, but traditionally studies have been limited to not examining individual-level behaviour, or only considering a small number of individuals. We used automated recording of...

Data from: The influence of evaluative right/wrong feedback on phonological and semantic processes in word learning

Saloni Krishnan, Elise Sellars, Helena Wood, Dorothy V.M. Bishop, Kate E. Watkins & Dorothy V. M. Bishop
Feedback is typically incorporated in word learning paradigms, in both research studies and commercial language learning apps. While the common-sense view is that feedback is helpful during learning, relatively little empirical evidence about the role of feedback in spoken vocabulary learning exists. Some work has suggested that long-term word learning is not enhanced by the presence of feedback, and that words are best learned implicitly. It is also plausible that feedback might have differential effects...

Data from: Insect herbivory on seedlings of rainforest trees: effects of density and distance of conspecific and heterospecific neighbours

Harriet Downey, Owen T. Lewis, Michael B. Bonsall, D. Catalina Fernandez & Sofia Gripenberg
1. Natural enemies of plants such as insect herbivores can contribute to structuring and maintaining plant diversity in tropical forests. Most research in this area has focused on the role of specialised enemies and the extent to which herbivory on individual plant species is density-dependent. 2. Relatively few insect herbivores specialise on a single host plant species. Insect herbivores that feed on more than one plant species may link the regeneration dynamics of their host...

Data from: Relative effects of LDL-C on ischaemic stroke & coronary disease: a Mendelian randomization study

Elsa Valdes-Marquez, Sarah Parish, Robert Clarke, Traiani Stari, Bradford B. Worrall & Jemma C. Hopewell
Objective: To examine the causal relevance of lifelong differences in LDL-C for ischaemic stroke (IS) relative to that for coronary heart disease (CHD) using a Mendelian randomization approach. Methods: We undertook a two-sample Mendelian randomization, based on summary data, to estimate the causal relevance of LDL-C for risk of IS and CHD. Information from 62 independent genetic variants with genome-wide significant effects on LDL-C levels was used to estimate the causal effects of LDL-C for...

Data from: Impacts of species richness on productivity in a large-scale subtropical forest experiment

Yuanyuan Huang, Yuxin Chen, Nadia Castro-Izaguirre, Martin Baruffol, Matteo Brezzi, Anne Lang, Ying Li, Werner Härdtle, Werner Von Oheimb, Xuefeu Yang, Xiaojuan Liu, Kequan Pei, Sabine Both, Bo Yang, David Eichenberg, Thorsten Assmann, Jürgen Bauhus, Thorsten Behrens, François Buscot, Xiao-Yong Chen, Douglas Chester, Bing-Yang Ding, Walter Durka, Alexandra Erfmeier, Jingyun Fang … & Bernhard Schmid
Biodiversity experiments have shown that species loss reduces ecosystem functioning in grassland. To test whether this result can be extrapolated to forests, the main contributors to terrestrial primary productivity, requires large-scale experiments. We manipulated tree species richness by planting more than 150,000 trees in plots with 1 to 16 species. Simulating multiple extinction scenarios, we found that richness strongly increased stand-level productivity. After 8 years, 16-species mixtures had accumulated over twice the amount of carbon...

Data from: Flower preferences and pollen transport networks for cavity nesting solitary bees: implications for the design of agri-environment schemes

Catherine E.A. Gresty, Elizabeth Clare, Dion S. Devey, Robyn S. Cowan, Laszlo Csiba, Panagiota Malakasi, Owen T. Lewis, Katherine J. Willis & Catherine E. A. Gresty
Floral foraging resources are valuable for pollinator conservation on farmland, and their provision is encouraged by agri-environment schemes in many countries. Across Europe, wildflower seed mixtures are widely sown on farmland to encourage pollinators, but the extent to which key pollinator groups such as solitary bees exploit and benefit from these resources is unclear. We used high-throughput sequencing of 164 pollen samples extracted from the brood cells of 6 common cavity nesting solitary bee species...

Data from: Nest survival in year-round breeding tropical Red-capped Larks (Calandrella cinerea) increases with higher nest abundance but decreases with higher invertebrate availability and rainfall

Joseph Mwangi, Henry K. Ndithia, Rosemarie Kentie, Muchane Muchai & B. Irene Tieleman
Nest survival is critical to breeding in birds and plays an important role in life-history evolution and population dynamics. Studies evaluating the proximate factors involved in explaining nest survival and the resulting temporal patterns are biased in favor of temperate regions. Yet, such studies are especially pertinent to the tropics, where nest predation rates are typically high and environmental conditions often allow for year-round breeding. To tease apart the effects of calendar month and year,...

Data from: The effect of interaural timing on the posterior auricular muscle reflex in normal adult volunteers

Timothy P Doubell, Ali Alsetrawi, Diandra A S Bastawrous, Madonna A S Bastawrous, Ahmed Daibes, AbuBaker Jadalla & J. W. H. Schnupp
The posterior auricular muscle (PAM) reflex to sounds has been used clinically to determine hearing threshold as an alternative to other audiological diagnostic measures such as the auditory brainstem response. We have shown that the PAM response is also sensitive to interaural timing differences in normally hearing adults. PAM responses were evoked by both ipsilateral/ contralateral monaural stimulation and by binaural stimulation. Introducing sound delays ipsilaterally or contralaterally decreased the PAM response amplitude and increased...

Data from: Heritable spouse effects increase evolutionary potential of human reproductive timing

Simon R. Evans, Dominique Waldvogel, Nina Vasiljevic & Erik Postma
Sexual reproduction is inherently interactive, especially in animal species such as humans that exhibit extended pair bonding. Yet we have little knowledge of the role of male characteristics and their evolutionary impact on reproductive behavioural phenotypes, to the extent that biologists typically consider component traits (e.g., reproductive timing) as female-specific. Based on extensive genealogical data detailing the life-histories of 6,435 human mothers born across four centuries of modern history, we use an animal modelling approach...

Data from: Spring weather conditions influence breeding phenology and reproductive success in sympatric bat populations.

Danielle M. Linton & David W. Macdonald
1. Climate is known to influence breeding phenology and reproductive success in temperate zone bats, but long-term population level studies and interspecific comparisons are rare. 2. Investigating the extent to which intrinsic (i.e. age), and extrinsic (i.e. spring weather conditions), factors influence such key demographic parameters as the proportion of females becoming pregnant, or completing lactation, each breeding season, is vital to understanding of bat population ecology and life-history traits. 3. Using data from twelve...

Data from: Competition between sympatric wolf taxa: an example involving African and Ethiopian Wolves

Tariku Mekonnen Gutema, Anagaw Atickem, Afework Bekele, Claudio Sillero-Zubiri, Mohammed Kasso, Diress Tsegaye, Vivek V. Venkataraman, Peter J. Fashing, Dietmar Zinner & Nils C. Stenseth
Carnivore populations are declining globally due to range contraction, persecution and prey depletion. One consequence of these patterns is increased range and niche overlap with other carnivores, and thus an elevated potential for competitive exclusion. Here we document competition between an endangered canid, the Ethiopian wolf (EW), and the newly discovered African wolf (AW) in central Ethiopia. The diet of the ecological specialist EW was dominated by rodents whereas the AW consumed more diverse diet...

Data from: Morphology and phylogenetic relationships of fossil snake mackerels and cutlassfishes (Trichiuroidea) from the Eocene (Ypresian) London Clay Formation

Hermione T. Beckett, Sam Giles, Zerina Johanson & Matt Friedman
‘Gempylids’ (snake mackerels) and trichiurids (cutlassfishes) are pelagic fishes characterised by slender to eel-like bodies, deep-sea predatory ecologies, and large fang-like teeth. Several hypotheses of relationships between these groups have been proposed, but a consensus remains elusive. Fossils attributed to ‘gempylids’ and trichiurids consist almost exclusively of highly compressed body fossils and isolated teeth and otoliths. We use micro-computed tomography to redescribe two three-dimensional crania, historically assigned to †Eutrichiurides winkleri and †Progempylus edwardsi, as well...

Data from: Feeder density enhances house finch disease transmission in experimental epidemics

Sahnzi C. Moyers, James S. Adelman, Damien R. Farine, Courtney A. Thomason & Dana M. Hawley
Aviary_Sampling_Data_FinalAll on-site sampling data (date, mass, eye score, etc.)flockmate_contacts_repeatedAggressive interactions by non-index birdflockmates.feeding.repeated.041717Feeding behaviors of non-index birdsfollowing_latencies_finalIndex following latenciesIndex_Contacts_RepeatedAggressive interactions (index birds)Index_Feeder_PreferenceTime index birds spent on individual feeders within the compartmentsIndex_Feeding_Repeated_041917Feeding behaviors of index birdsPathogen_LoadsqPCR data

Data from: Analysis of wild macaque stone tools used to crack oil palm nuts

Tomos Proffitt, V. Lydia Luncz, Suchinda Malaivijitnond, Michael Gumert, Magdalena S. Svensson & Micahel Haslam
The discovery of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) nut-cracking by wild long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) is significant for the study of non-human primate and hominin percussive behaviour. Up until now, only West African chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and modern human populations were known to use stone hammers to crack open this particular hard-shelled palm nut. The addition of non-habituated, wild macaques increases our comparative dataset of primate lithic percussive behaviour focused on this one plant species....

Data from: Microenvironment and functional-trait context dependence predict alpine plant community dynamics

Benjamin Blonder, Rozalia E. Kapas, Rebecca M. Dalton, Bente J. Graae, Jacob M. Heiling & Øystein H. Opedal
Predicting the structure and dynamics of communities is difficult. Approaches linking functional traits to niche boundaries, species co‐occurrence and demography are promising, but have so far had limited success. We hypothesized that predictability in community ecology could be improved by incorporating more accurate measures of fine‐scale environmental heterogeneity and the context‐dependent function of traits. We tested these hypotheses using long term whole‐community demography data from an alpine plant community in Colorado. Species distributions along microenvironmental...

Mark-Release-Recapture data showing moth and dung beetle movements in riparian reserves within the SAFE project landscape, Malaysian Borneo, 2016-17

R.E.J. Gray, E.M. Slade, A.Y.C. Chung & O.T. Lewis
This dataset consists of moth and dung beetle recapture, movement, and trait data from a mark-release-recapture experiment conducted within riparian forest reserves, in an oil palm landscape in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo conducted as part of the SAFE project (Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems). This resource includes information regarding the recapture frequency and movement behaviour of both moths and dung beetles with respect to three habitat types: riparian forest reserve, continuous forest, and oil palm plantation....

Data from: Hosts do not simply outsource pathogen resistance to protective symbionts

Jan Hrcek, Benjamin J. Parker, Ailsa H.C. McLean, Jean-Christophe Simon, Ciara M. Mann & H. Charles J. Godfray
Microbial symbionts commonly protect their hosts from natural enemies, but it is unclear how protective symbionts influence the evolution of host immunity to pathogens. One possibility is that ‘extrinsic’ protection provided by symbionts allows hosts to reduce investment in ‘intrinsic’ immunological resistance mechanisms. We tested this idea using pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) and their facultative bacterial symbionts that increase host resistance to the fungal pathogen Pandora neoaphidis. The pea aphid taxon is composed of multiple...

Data from: Hotspot mutations and ColE1 plasmids contribute to the fitness of Salmonella Heidelberg in poultry litter

Adelumola Oladeinde, Kimberly Cook, Alex Orlek, Greg Zock, Kyler Herrington, Nelson Cox, Jodie Plumblee Lawrence & Carolina Hall
Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) is a clinically-important serovar linked to food-borne illness, and commonly isolated from poultry. Investigations of a large, multistate outbreak in the USA in 2013 identified poultry litter (PL) as an important extra-intestinal environment that may have selected for specific S. Heidelberg strains. Poultry litter is a mixture of bedding materials and chicken excreta that contains chicken gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria, undigested feed, feathers, and other materials of chicken...

Data from: Glutamate receptor delta2 serum antibodies in paediatric opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome

Georgina Berridge, David A Menassa, Teresa Moloney, Patrick J Waters, Imogen Welding, Selina Thomsen, Sameer Zuberi, Roman Fischer, A. Radu Aricescu, Michael Pike, Russell C Dale, Benedikt Kessler, Angela Vincent, Ming Lim, Sarosh R Irani & Bethan Lang
Objective: To identify neuronal surface antibodies in opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome (OMAS) usingcontemporary antigen discovery methodology. Methods: OMAS patient serum IgG immunohistochemistry using age-equivalent rat cerebellar tissue was followed by immunoprecipitation, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Data are available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD009578). This generated a list of potential neuronal surface cerebellar autoantigens. Live cell-based assays (CBA) were used to confirm membrane-surface antigens and adsorb antigen-specific IgGs. The serological results were compared to the clinical...

Data from: Understanding co-occurrence by modelling species simultaneously with a Joint Species Distribution Model (JSDM)

Laura J. Pollock, Reid Tingley, William K. Morris, Nick Golding, Robert B. O'Hara, Kirsten M. Parris, Peter A. Vesk & Michael A. McCarthy
A primary goal of ecology is to understand the fundamental processes underlying the geographic distributions of species. Two major strands of ecology – habitat modelling and community ecology – approach this problem differently. Habitat modellers often use species distribution models (SDMs) to quantify the relationship between species’ and their environments without considering potential biotic interactions. Community ecologists, on the other hand, tend to focus on biotic interactions and, in observational studies, use co‐occurrence patterns to...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    92

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    92

Affiliations

  • University of Oxford
    92
  • University of Zurich
    7
  • University of Minnesota
    4
  • Australian National University
    4
  • University of Edinburgh
    4
  • University of Exeter
    4
  • Durham University
    3
  • University of Sheffield
    3
  • National Museum
    2
  • University of Sussex
    2