90 Works

Functional traits of avian species of an Afrotropical forest

Marie Laure Rurangwa
Aim: Although land-use change is a leading cause of biodiversity loss worldwide, there is scant information on the extent to which it has affected the structure and composition of bird communities in the Afrotropical region. This study aimed to quantify the effects of habitat transformation on taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity in Afrotropical bird communities. Location: Nyungwe landscape, a montane rainforest with adjoining farmland in south-west Rwanda. Methods: Data on bird occurrence, abundance, and functional...

Cognition and covariance in the producer-scrounger game

Michael Reichert, Julie Morand-Ferron, Ipek Kulahci, Josh Firth, Gabrielle Davidson, Sam Crofts & John Quinn
1. The producer-scrounger game is a key element of foraging ecology in many systems. Producing and scrounging typically covary negatively, but partitioning this covariance into contributions of individual plasticity and consistent between individual differences is key to understanding population level consequences of foraging strategies. Furthermore, little is known about the role cognition plays in the producer-scrounger game. 2. We investigated the role of cognition in these alternative foraging tactics in wild mixed-species flocks of great...

Data from: Olfactory testing in Parkinson’s disease & REM behavior disorder: a machine learning approach

Christine Lo, Siddharth Arora, Yoav Ben-Shlomo, Thomas Barber, Michael Lawton, Johannes Klein, Sofia Kanavou, Annette Janzen, Elisabeth Sittig, Wolfgang Oertel, Donald Grosset & Michele Hu
Objective: We sought to identify an abbreviated test of impaired olfaction, amenable for use in busy clinical environments in prodromal (isolated REM sleep Behavior Disorder (iRBD)) and manifest Parkinson’s. Methods: 890 PD and 313 control participants in the Discovery cohort study underwent Sniffin’ stick odour identification assessment. Random forests were initially trained to distinguish individuals with poor (functional anosmia/hyposmia) and good (normosmia/super-smeller) smell ability using all 16 Sniffin’ sticks. Models were retrained using the top...

Datasets and documentation PRELIM Pilot Survey 2017: Getting sustainable, person-centred musculoskeletal health intelligence from primary care electronic health record linkage and modelling: the PRELIM initiative.

Ross Wilkie, Dahai Yu, Kelvin P. Jordan, George M. Peat, Jo Protheroe, Clare Jinks, Kate Dunn, Mamas Mamas, Daniel Prieto-Alhambra, Alan Silman & Karen Walker-Bone

Dissolved rhenium and other dissolved ions in Alpine catchments of the Erlenbach and Vogelbach (Switzerland) and the East River (Colorado, USA)

Robert G Hilton & Mathieu Dellinger
The measurements and data contained here were obtained to study the chemical weathering of sedimentary rocks, and more specifically the oxidation of rock organic carbon and the associated release of CO2. The primary aim was to better understand the production and mobility of the trace element rhenium during weathering, because this element has been proposed as a proxy for rock organic carbon oxidation. The study focused on three Alpine catchments that drain sedimentary rocks, which...

Identifying relationships between multi-scale social-ecological factors to explore ungulate health in a Western Kazakhstan rangeland

Munib Khanyari, Sarah Robinson, Eric Morgan, Albert Salemgareyev & E.J. Milner-Gulland
1. Rangelands are multi-use landscapes which are socially and ecologically important in different ways. Among other interactions, shared use of rangelands by wildlife and livestock can lead to disease transmission. Understanding wildlife and livestock health and managing disease transmission in rangelands requires an integration of social and ecological knowledge. 2. Using the example of Western Kazakhstan, home to two types of ungulate hosts, the critically-endangered saiga antelopes, Saiga tatarica, and livestock, we conducted a cross-scale...

Immigrant males’ memory acts to reduce ranging overlap and mating competition in wild baboons

Julien Collet, Nathalie Pettorelli, Alice Baniel, Alecia Carter, Elise Huchard, Andrew King, Alexander Lee, Harry Marshall & Guy Cowlishaw
Mechanistic models suggest that information acquired by animals (“knowledge”) could shape home range patterns and dynamics, and how neighbours share space. In social species this would suggest that immigrants could bring new knowledge into social groups, potentially affecting the dynamics of home range overlap. We tested this “immigrant knowledge hypothesis” in a wild population of chacma baboons (Papio ursinus). We used data collected between 2005 and 2013 on two neighbouring troops in Namibia, comprising GPS...

The use of nanobodies in a sensitive ELISA test for SARS-CoV-2 Spike 1 protein

Georgina C. Girt, Abirami Lakshminarayanan, Jiandong Huo, Joshua Dormon, Chelsea Norman, Babak Afrough, Adam Harding, William James, Raymond J. Owens & James H. Naismith
A rapid detection method for SARS-CoV-2 spike protein is essential for control of COVID19. We investigated various combinations of engineered nanobodies in a sandwich ELISA to detect the Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2. We have identified an optimal combination of nanobodies. These were selectively functionalised to further improve antigen capture. This dataset contains data from ELISA experiments described in the manuscript. Plate coating of nanobodies for ELISA by passive adsorption vs biotinylation was compared. A series...

Hypothalamic remodeling of thyroid hormone signaling during hibernation in the arctic ground squirrel

Helen Chmura, Cassie Duncan, Ben Saer, Jeanette Moore, Brian Barnes, C. Loren Buck, Helen Christian, Andrew Loudon & Cory Williams
These data were collected from arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii) between Summer 2016 and Spring 2019 on a collaborative NSF-funded project examining the neuroendocrine regulation of the transition between hibernation and reproduction. The three experiments consist of (1) a repeated cross-sectional study conducted in both males and females hibernating in constant darkness and constant temperature (2) an extreme mid-winter warming study conducted in males only and (3) an end of hibernation warming study conducted in...

The new normal? Redaction bias in biomedical science

David Robert Grimes & James Heathers
A concerning amount of biomedical research is not reproducible. Unreliable results impede empirical progress in medical science, ultimately putting patients at risk. Many proximal causes of this irreproducibility have been identified, a major one being inappropriate statistical methods and analytical choices by investigators. Within this, we formally quantify the impact inappropriate redaction beyond a threshold value in biomedical science. This is effectively truncation of a data-set by removing extreme data points, and we elucidate its...

Analysis of independent cohorts of outbred CFW mice reveals novel loci for behavioral and physiological traits and identifies factors determining reproducibility

Jennifer Zou, Shyam Gopalakrishnan, Clarissa Parker, Jerome Nicod, Richard Mott, Na Cai, Arimantas Lionikas, Robert Davies, Abraham Palmer & Jonathan Flint
Combining samples for genetic association is standard practice in human genetic analysis of complex traits, but is rarely undertaken in rodent genetics. Here, using 23 phenotypes and genotypes from two independent laboratories, we obtained a sample size of 3,076 commercially available outbred mice and identified 70 loci, more than double the number of loci identified in the component studies. Fine-mapping in the combined sample reduced the number of likely causal variants, with a median reduction...

Data for: Direct evidence for increased disease resistance in polyandrous broods exists only in eusocial

Deanna Soper, Alice Ekroth & M Joao Martins
Background The ‘genetic diversity’ hypothesis posits that polyandry evolved as a mechanism to increase genetic diversity within broods. One extension of this hypothesis is the ‘genetic diversity for disease resistance’ hypothesis (GDDRH). Originally designed for eusocial Hymenoptera, GDDRH states that polyandry will evolve as an effect of lower parasite prevalence in genetically variable broods. However, this hypothesis has been broadly applied to several other taxa. It is unclear how much empirical evidence supports GDDRH specifically,...

The R package enerscape: A general energy landscape framework for terrestrial movement ecology

Emilio Berti, Marco Davoli, Robert Buitenwerf, Alexander Dyer, Oskar Hansen, Myriam Hirt, Jens-Christian Svenning, Jördis Terlau, Ulrich Brose & Fritz Vollrath
Ecological processes and biodiversity patterns are strongly affected by how animals move through the landscape. However, it remains challenging to predict animal movement and space use. Here we present our new R package enerscape to quantify and predict animal movement in real landscapes based on energy expenditure. Enerscape integrates a general locomotory model for terrestrial animals with GIS tools in order to map energy costs of movement in a given environment, resulting in energy landscapes...

Data from: Local prey shortages drive foraging costs and breeding success in a declining seabird, the Atlantic puffin

Annette L Fayet, Gemma V Clucas, Tycho Anker-Nilssen, Martyna Syposz & Erpur S Hansen
As more and more species face anthropogenic threats, understanding causes of population declines in vulnerable taxa is essential. However, long-term datasets, ideal to identify lasting or indirect effects on fitness measures such as those caused by environmental factors, are not always available. Here we use a single year but multi-population approach on populations with contrasting demographic trends to identify possible drivers and mechanisms of seabird population changes in the north-east Atlantic, using the Atlantic puffin,...

Microsatellite data of Vincetoxicum hirundinaria offspring and their inferred mother plants from 13 populations in the South-Western Finnish Archipelago

Anne Muola, J. F. Scheepens, Liisa Laukkanen, Aino Kalske, Pia Mutikainen & Roosa Leimu
Fragmented landscapes may have implications for the genetic structure of populations and for the microevolution of plant species. In particular, landscape fragmentation and/or population isolation might affect the evolution of plant mating systems. Here, we study the consequences of landscape fragmentation on the genetic structure of populations of a perennial herb, Vincetoxicum hirundinaria with a mixed mating system. Our study area, the south-western Finnish archipelago, was formed after the glacial ice sheet started to retreat...

Association with a novel protective microbe facilitates host adaptation to a stressful environment

Kim Hoang, Nicole Gerardo & Levi Morran
Protective symbionts can allow hosts to occupy otherwise uninhabitable niches. Despite the importance of symbionts in host evolution, we know little about how these associations arise. Encountering a microbe that can improve host fitness in a stressful environment may favor persistent interactions with that microbe, potentially facilitating a long-term association. The bacterium Bacillus subtilis protects Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes from heat shock by increasing host fecundity compared to the non-protective Escherichia coli. In this study, we...

Testing the effectiveness of the Forest Integrity Assessment: A field-based tool for estimating the condition of tropical forest

Andrew Suggitt, Kok Yeong, Anders Lindhe, Agnes Agama, Keith Hamer, Glen Reynolds, Jane Hill & Jennifer Lucey
1. Global targets to halt biodiversity losses and mitigate climate change will require protecting rainforest beyond current protected area networks, necessitating responsible forest stewardship from a diverse range of companies, communities and private individuals. Robust assessments of forest condition are critical for successful forest management, but many existing techniques are highly technical, time-consuming, expensive, or require specialist knowledge. 2. To make assessment of tropical forests accessible to a wide range of actors, many of whom...

Data from: Postcrania of Borealestes (Mammaliformes: Docodonta) and the emergence of ecomorphological diversity in early mammals

Elsa Panciroli, Roger Benson, Vincent Fernandez, Matthew Humpage, Alberto Martin-Serra, Stig Walsh, Zhe-Xi Luo & Nick Fraser
The Middle Jurassic witnessed the early diversification of mammal groups, including the stem-mammalian clade, Docodonta. Recent discoveries in China indicate docodontans exhibited ecomorphological diversity akin to small-bodied mammals living >100 million years later, in the Cenozoic. Our understanding of the emergence of this ecological diversity is hindered by a lack of Middle Jurassic fossil material from other parts of the world. The two partial postcranial skeletons of Borealestes described here come from the Kilmaluag Formation,...

Data from: Ecological and biogeographic drivers of biodiversity cannot be resolved using clade age-richness data

Daniel Rabosky & Roger Benson
Estimates of evolutionary diversification rates – speciation and extinction – have been used extensively to explain global biodiversity patterns. Many studies have analysed diversification rates derived from just two pieces of information: a clade's age and its extant species richness. This "age-richness rate" (ARR) estimator provides a convenient shortcut for comparative studies, but makes strong assumptions about the dynamics of species richness through time. We demonstrate that use of the ARR estimator in comparative studies...

Mammaliaform extinctions as a driver of the morphological radiation of Cenozoic mammals

Neil Brocklehurst, Elsa Panciroli, Gemma Benevento & Roger B.J. Benson
Adaptive radiations are hypothesised as a generating mechanism for much of the morphological diversity of extant species1,2,3,4,5,6,7. The Cenozoic radiation of placental mammals, the foundational example of this concept8,9, gave rise to much of the morphological disparity of extant mammals, and is generally attributed to relaxed evolutionary constraints following the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs10,11,12,13. However, study of this and other radiations has focussed on variation in evolutionary rates4,5,7,14, leaving the extent to which relaxation of...

Ocean and ice spin-up data for role of surface gravity waves in aquaplanet ocean climates

Joshua Studholme, Margarita Markina & Sergey Gulev
This data corresponds to the runs analysed in the manscript: Role of Surface Gravity Waves in Aquaplanet Ocean Climates (JAMES, 2021). In this work, we present a set of idealised numerical experiments that demonstrate the thermodynamic and dynamic implications of surface gravity waves for the oceanic climate of an aquaplanet. We study the impact of accounting for modulations by such waves upon air-sea momentum fluxes, Langmuir circulation and the Stokes-Coriolis force. This dataset is made...

Functional assembly of tropical montane tree islands in the Atlantic Forest is shaped by stress-tolerance, bamboo-presence and facilitation

Tina Christmann, Bruno H.P. Rosado, Guillaume Delhaye, ILAINE MATOS, Helena Roland, Yan Moraes, Julia Drummond & Imma Oliveras
Aims: Amidst the Campos de Altitude (Highland Grasslands) in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, woody communities grow either clustered in tree islands or interspersed within the herbaceous matrix. The functional ecology, diversity and biotic processes shaping these plant communities are largely unstudied. We characterised the functional assembly and diversity of these tropical montane woody communities and investigated how they fit within Grime’s CSR (C – competitor, S – stress-tolerant, R – ruderal) scheme, what functional trade-offs...

Tetracyanoresorcin[4]arene selectively recognises trimethyllysine and inhibits its enzyme-catalysed demethylation

Hayden Peacock, Cyrille C. Thinnes, Akane Kawamura & Andrew D. Hamilton
(2016). Tetracyanoresorcin[4]arene selectively recognises trimethyllysine and inhibits its enzyme-catalysed demethylation. Supramolecular Chemistry: Vol. 28, Thirteenth International Conference on Calixarenes (Calix 2015), pp. 575-581.

Potential afforestation scenarios based on catchment structure and land cover for twelve catchments in Great Britain for use with the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES)

M. Buechel
Data comprise a set of broadleaf afforestation scenarios (provided as netCDF files) that may be run with the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), a community land surface model. The scenarios are based on the CEH Land Cover 2000 classification. Afforestation takes place according to catchment structure and existing land cover. Scenarios cover twelve river catchments in Great Britain: Dee, Tay, Ouse, Ure, Derwent, Thames, Avon, Tamar, Severn at Bewdley , Severn at Haw Bridge,...

Focused Ion Beam tomography on fossilized osteocytes

Yara Haridy, Markus Osenberg, André Hilger, Ingo Manke, Donald Davesne & Florian Witzmann
Osteocytes play a central role in bone metabolism in extant vertebrates, but their evolutionary history is poorly understood. Therefore osteocyte lacunae microstructure of fossil bone was studied on the nanometer scale by means of focused ion beam tomography (FIB). A osteostracan and a “placoderm” were imaged, the earliest groups with cellular bone, and secondary osteons respectively. To visualize and characterize the early bone composition via the morphology and distribution of osteocyte lacunae, thereby imaging the...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    90

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    90

Affiliations

  • University of Oxford
    89
  • Yale University
    6
  • University College London
    5
  • Institute of Oceanology. PP Shirshov Russian Academy of Sciences
    4
  • University of Leeds
    4
  • University of Florida
    3
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2