Data from: Life history trait divergence among populations of a non-palatable species reveals strong non-trophic indirect effects of an abundant herbivore

Christopher D. Heckel & Susan Kalisz
When large herbivores exert selection on their prey plant species, co-occurring, non-prey species may experience selection through non-trophic indirect effects. Such selection is likely common where herbivores are overabundant. Yet, empirical studies of non-trophic indirect effects as drivers of non-prey trait evolution are lacking. Here we test for adaptive shifts in life history traits in an unpalatable species, Arisaema triphyllum, a common forest perennial that is unique because it exhibits size-dependent sex switching. We collected...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Pittsburgh
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  • Carnegie Museum of Natural History
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  • Hillsdale College
    1