261 Works

European Database of Seismogenic Faults (EDSF)

Roberto Basili, Vanja Kastelic, Mine Betül Demircioglu, David Garcia Moreno, Eliza S. Nemser, Patrizio Petricca, Sotiris P. Sboras, Glenda M. Besana-Ostman, João Cabral, Thierry Camelbeeck, Riccardo Caputo, Laurentiu Danciu, Hilal Domaç, João Filipe de Barros Duarte Fonseca, Julián García-Mayordomo, Domenico Giardini, Branislav Glavatovic, Levent Gulen, Yigit Ince, Spyros Pavlides, Karin Sesetyan, Gabriele Tarabusi, Mara Monica Tiberti, Murat Utkucu, Gianluca Valensise … & Jochen Wössner
The European Database of Seismogenic Faults (EDSF) was compiled in the framework of the EU Project SHARE, Work Package 3, Task 3.2. EDSF includes only faults that are deemed to be capable of generating earthquakes of magnitude equal to or larger than 5.5 and aims at ensuring a homogenous input for use in ground-shaking hazard assessment in the Euro-Mediterranean area. Several research institutions participated in this effort with the contribution of many scientists (see the...

Permasense

, &
Ambient vibration data from seismic stations on the summit and ridge of one of the tallest freestanding mountains in the Swiss Alps – the Matterhorn – as from a nearby local reference seismic station

ISIMIP3 soil input data

Jan Volkholz & Christoph Müller
The Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) provides a framework for the collation of a consistent set of climate impact data across sectors and scales. It also provides a unique opportunity for considering interactions between climate change impacts across sectors through consistent scenarios.
The ISIMIP3a part of the third simulation round is dedicated to i) impact model evaluation and improvement and ii) detection and attribution of observed impacts according to the framework of IPCC AR5 Working...

ISIMIP3b lakes input data

Inne Vanderkelen & Jacob Schewe
The Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) provides a framework for the collation of a consistent set of climate impact data across sectors and scales. It also provides a unique opportunity for considering interactions between climate change impacts across sectors through consistent scenarios.
The ISIMIP3b part of the third simulation round is dedicated to a quantification of climate-related risks at different levels of global warming and socio-economic change. ISIMIP3b group I simulations are based on historical...

Data from: A web platform for landuse, climate, demography, hydrology and beach erosion in the Black Sea catchment

Anthony Lehmann, Yaniss Guigoz, Nicolas Ray, Emanuele Mancuso, Karim C. Abbaspour, Elham Rouholahnejad Freund, Karin Allenbach, Andrea De Bono, Marc Fasel, Ana Gago-Silva, Roger Bär, Pierre Lacroix & Grégory Giuliani
The Black Sea catchment (BSC) is facing important demographic, climatic and landuse changes that may increase pollution, vulnerability and scarcity of water resources, as well as beach erosion through sea level rise. Limited access to reliable time-series monitoring data from environmental, statistical, and socio-economical sources is a major barrier to policy development and decision-making. To address these issues, a web-based platform was developed to enable discovery and access to key environmental information for the region....

Data from: Faster clonal turnover in high-infection habitats provides evidence for parasite-mediated selection

Dorota Paczesniak, Sofia Adolfsson, Katri Liljeroos, Kirsten Klappert, Curt M. Lively & Jukka Jokela
According to the Red Queen hypothesis for sex, parasite-mediated selection against common clones counterbalances the reproductive advantage of asexual lineages, which would otherwise outcompete sexual conspecifics. Such selection on the clonal population is expected to lead to a faster clonal turnover in habitats where selection by parasites is stronger. We tested this prediction by comparing the genetic structure of clonal and sexual populations of freshwater snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum between years 2003 and 2007 in three...

Data from: Cross-biome patterns in soil microbial respiration predictable from evolutionary theory on thermal adaptation

Mark A. Bradford, Rebecca L. McCulley, Thomas W. Crowther, Emily E. Oldfield, Stephen A. Wood & Noah Fierer
Climate warming may stimulate microbial metabolism of soil carbon, causing a carbon cycle-climate feedback whereby carbon is redistributed from soil to atmospheric CO2. The magnitude of this feedback is uncertain, in part because warming-induced shifts in microbial physiology and/or community composition could retard or accelerate soil carbon losses. Here, we measure microbial respiration rates for soils collected from 22 sites in each of three years, at locations spanning boreal to tropical climates. Respiration was measured...

Data from: Population genetic dynamics of an invasion reconstructed from the sediment egg bank

Markus Möst, Sarah Oexle, Silvia Markova, Dalia Aidukaite, Livia Baumgartner, Hans-Bernd Stich, Martin Wessels, Dominik Martin-Creuzburg & Piet Spaak
Biological invasions are a global issue with far-reaching consequences for single species, communities and whole ecosystems. Our understanding of modes and mechanisms of biological invasions requires knowledge of the genetic processes associated with successful invasions. In many instances, this information is particularly difficult to obtain as the initial phases of the invasion process often pass unnoticed and we rely on inferences from contemporary population genetic data. Here, we combined historic information with the genetic analysis...

Data from: Water-borne pharmaceuticals reduce phenotypic diversity and response capacity of natural phytoplankton communities

Francesco Pomati, Jukka Jokela, Sara Castiglioni, Mirdul K. Thomas & Luca Nizzetto
Chemical micropollutants occur worldwide in the environment at low concentrations and in complex mixtures, and how they affect the ecology of natural systems is still uncertain. Dynamics of natural communities are driven by the interaction between individual organisms and their growth environment, which is mediated by the organisms' expressed phenotypic traits. We tested whether exposure to a mixture of 12 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP) influences phenotypic trait diversity in lake phytoplankton communities and...

Data from: Vegetation recovery in tidal marshes reveals critical slowing down under increased inundation

Jim Van Belzen, Johan Van De Koppel, Matthew L. Kirwan, Daphne Van Der Wal, Peter M. J. Herman, Vasilis Dakos, Sonia Kéfi, Marten Scheffer, Glenn R. Guntenspergen & Tjeerd J. Bouma
A declining rate of recovery following disturbance has been proposed as an important early warning for impending tipping points in complex systems. Despite extensive theoretical and laboratory studies, this ‘critical slowing down’ remains largely untested in the complex settings of real-world ecosystems. Here, we provide both observational and experimental support of critical slowing down along natural stress gradients in tidal marsh ecosystems. Time series of aerial images of European marsh development reveal a consistent lengthening...

Data from: Why there are no essential genes on plasmids

Samuel J. Tazzyman & Sebastian Bonhoeffer
Mobile genetic elements such as plasmids are important for the evolution of prokaryotes. It has been suggested that there are differences between functions coded for by mobile genes and those in the “core” genome and that these differences can be seen between plasmids and chromosomes. In particular, it has been suggested that essential genes, such as those involved in the formation of structural proteins or in basic metabolic functions, are rarely located on plasmids. We...

Data from: QTL mapping of temperature sensitivity reveals candidate genes for thermal adaptation and growth morphology in the plant pathogenic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici

Mark H. Lendenmann, Daniel Croll, Javier Palma-Guerrero, Ethan L. Stewart & Bruce A. McDonald
Different thermal environments impose strong, differential selection on populations, leading to local adaptation, but the genetic basis of thermal adaptation is poorly understood. We used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici to study the genetic architecture of thermal adaptation and identify candidate genes. Four wild-type strains originating from the same thermal environment were crossed to generate two mapping populations with 263 (cross 1) and 261 (cross 2) progeny. Restriction...

Data from: Trait means, trait plasticity and trait differences to other species jointly explain species performances in grasslands of varying diversity

Christiane Roscher, Marlén Gubsch, Annett Lipowsky, Jens Schumacher, Alexandra Weigelt, Nina Buchmann, Ernst-Detlef Schulze & Bernhard Schmid
Functional traits may help to explain the great variety of species performances in plant communities, but it is not clear whether the magnitude of trait values of a focal species or trait differences to co-occurring species are key for trait-based predictions. In addition, trait expression within species is often plastic, but this variation has been widely neglected in trait-based analyses. We studied functional traits and plant biomass of 59 species in 66 experimental grassland mixtures...

Data from: The biogeography of kin discrimination across microbial neighbourhoods

Susanne A. Kraemer, Sébastien Wielgoss, Francesca Fiegna & Gregory J. Velicer
The spatial distribution of potential interactants is critical to social evolution in all cooperative organisms. Yet the biogeography of microbial kin discrimination at the scales most relevant to social interactions is poorly understood. Here we resolve the microbiogeography of social identity and genetic relatedness in local populations of the model cooperative bacterium Myxococcus xanthus at small spatial scales, across which the potential for dispersal is high. Using two criteria of relatedness—colony-merger compatibility during cooperative motility...

Data from: Dynamics of deep soil carbon - insights from 14C time series across a climatic gradient

Tessa Sophia Van Der Voort, Utsav Mannu, Frank Hagedorn, Cameron McIntyre, Lorenz Walthert, Patrick Schleppi, Negar Haghipour & Timothy I. Eglinton
Quantitative constraints on soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics are essential for comprehensive understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Deep soil carbon is of particular interest, as it represents large stocks and its turnover times remain highly uncertain. In this study, SOM dynamics in both the top and deep soil across a climatic (average temperature ~1-9 °C) gradient are determined using time-series (~20 years) 14C data from bulk soil and water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC). Analytical measurements...

Data from: Swapping birth and death: symmetries and transformations in phylodynamic models

Tanja Stadler & Mike Steel
Stochastic birth--death models provide the foundation for studying and simulating evolutionary trees in phylodynamics. A curious feature of such models is that they exhibit fundamental symmetries when the birth and death rates are interchanged. In this paper, we first provide intuitive reasons for these known transformational symmetries. We then show that these transformational symmetries (encoded in algebraic identities) are preserved even when individuals at the present are sampled with some probability. However, these extended symmetries...

Data from: Variation in growth and defence traits among plant populations at different elevations: implications for adaptation to climate change

James Buckley, Alex Widmer, Mark C. Mescher & Consuelo M. De Moraes
Alpine plants occurring at high elevation are vulnerable to ongoing climate change, yet relatively little is known about the potential for high‐elevation species to adapt to changing environmental conditions. In particular, the extent to which high‐elevation plants will be able to resist predicted increases in the intensity of biotic interactions, such as herbivory, remains unclear. Species distributed across broad elevational ranges provide an opportunity to investigate evolutionary mechanisms and traits involved in adaptation to varying...

Data from: Identification of ZEB1 as a central component of the adipogenic gene regulatory network

Carine Gubelmann, Petra C. Schwalie, Sunil K. Raghav, Eva Röder, Delessa Tenagne, Elke Kiehlmann, Sebastian M. Waszak, Andrea Corsinotti, Gilles Udin, Wiebke Holcombe, Gottfried Rudowsky, Didier Trono, Christian Wolfrum & Bart Deplancke
Adipose tissue is a key determinant of whole body metabolism and energy homeostasis. Unraveling the regulatory mechanisms underlying adipogenesis is therefore highly relevant from a biomedical perspective. Our current understanding of fat cell differentiation is centered on the transcriptional cascades driven by the C/EBP protein family and the master regulator PPARγ. To elucidate further components of the adipogenic gene regulatory network, we performed a large-scale transcription factor (TF) screen overexpressing 734 TFs in mouse pre-adipocytes...

Data from: Resistance gene carriage predicts growth of natural and clinical Escherichia coli isolates in the absence of antibiotics

Richard C. Allen, Daniel C. Angst & Alex R. Hall
Bacterial pathogens that carry antibiotic resistance alleles sometimes pay a cost in the form of impaired growth in antibiotic-free conditions. This cost of resistance is expected to be a key parameter for understanding how resistance spreads and persists in pathogen populations. Analysis of individual resistance alleles from laboratory evolution and natural isolates has shown they are typically costly, but these costs are highly variable and influenced by genetic variation at other loci. It therefore remains...

Data from: Sensitivity of global soil carbon stocks to combined nutrient enrichment

Thomas W. Crowther, Charlotte Riggs, Eric M. Lind, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Sarah E. Hobbie, E. R. Jasper Wubs, Peter B. Adler, Jennifer Firn, Laureano Gherardi, Nicole Hagenah, Kirsten S. Hofmockel, Johannes M. H. Knops, Rebecca L. McCulley, Andrew MacDougall, Pablo L. Peri, Suzanne M. Prober, Carly J. Stevens & Devin Routh
Soil stores approximately twice as much carbon as the atmosphere and fluctuations in the size of the soil carbon pool directly influence climate conditions. We used the Nutrient Network global change experiment to examine how anthropogenic nutrient enrichment might influence grassland soil carbon storage at a global scale. In isolation, enrichment of nitrogen and phosphorous had minimal impacts on soil carbon storage. However, when these nutrients were added in combination with potassium and micronutrients, soil...

Data from: A further cost for the sicker sex? Evidence for male-biased parasite-induced vulnerability to predation

Jessica F. Stephenson, Cormac Kinsella, Joanne Cable & Cock Van Oosterhout
Males are typically the sicker sex. Data from multiple taxa indicate that they are more likely to be infected with parasites, and are less “tolerant,” or less able to mitigate the fitness costs of a given infection, than females. One cost of infection for many animals is an increased probability of being captured by a predator. A clear, hitherto untested, prediction is therefore that this parasite-induced vulnerability to predation is more pronounced among males than...

Data from: Future ecosystem services from European mountain forests under climate change

Marco Mina, Harald Bugmann, Thomas Cordonnier, Florian Irauschek, Matija Klopcic, Marta Pardos & Maxime Cailleret
Ecosystem services (ES) from mountain forests are highly relevant for human societies. ES with a direct economic support function (e.g. timber production), regulatory services (e.g. protection from natural hazards) and cultural services (e.g. recreation) are likely to be affected strongly by a rapidly changing climate. To evaluate whether adverse climate change effects on ES can be counteracted by adapting management, dynamic models and indicator-based assessments are needed. We applied a forest dynamic model in case...

Data from: Tempo and mode of genome evolution in a 50,000-generation experiment

Olivier Tenaillon, Jeffrey E. Barrick, Noah Ribeck, Daniel E. Deatherage, Jeffrey L. Blanchard, Aurko Dasgupta, Gabriel C. Wu, Sébastien Wielgoss, Stéphane Cruveiller, Claudine Médigue, Dominique Schneider & Richard E. Lenski
Adaptation by natural selection depends on the rates, effects and interactions of many mutations, making it difficult to determine what proportion of mutations in an evolving lineage are beneficial. Here we analysed 264 complete genomes from 12 Escherichia coli populations to characterize their dynamics over 50,000 generations. The populations that retained the ancestral mutation rate support a model in which most fixed mutations are beneficial, the fraction of beneficial mutations declines as fitness rises, and...

Data from: Large benefits to marine fisheries of meeting the 1.5°C global warming target

William W. L. Cheung, Gabriel Reygondeau & Thomas L. Froelicher
Translating the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 1.5°C above preindustrial level into impact-related targets facilitates communication of the benefits of mitigating climate change to policy-makers and stakeholders. Developing ecologically relevant impact-related targets for marine ecosystem services, such as fisheries, is an important step. Here, we use maximum catch potential and species turnover as climate-risk indicators for fisheries. We project that potential catches will decrease by more than 3 million metric tons per degree...

Data from: Interaction rewiring and the rapid turnover of plant-pollinator networks

Paul J. CaraDonna, William K. Petry, Ross M. Brennan, James L. Cunningham, Judith L. Bronstein, Nickolas M. Waser & Nathan J. Sanders
Whether species interactions are static or change over time has wide-reaching ecological and evolutionary consequences. However, species interaction networks are typically constructed from temporally aggregated interaction data, thereby implicitly assuming that interactions are fixed. This approach has advanced our understanding of communities, but it obscures the timescale at which interactions form (or dissolve) and the drivers and consequences of such dynamics. We address this knowledge gap by quantifying the within-season turnover of plant–pollinator interactions from...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    49
  • 2020
    38
  • 2019
    18
  • 2018
    24
  • 2017
    33
  • 2016
    30
  • 2015
    17
  • 2014
    25
  • 2013
    12
  • 2012
    10

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    261

Affiliations

  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
    241
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    29
  • University of Zurich
    29
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    20
  • ETH Zurich
    17
  • Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research
    13
  • University of Oxford
    8
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    7
  • University of East Anglia
    6
  • Stanford University
    5