29 Works

Data from: Stage and size structure of three species of oaks in central coastal California

Ian S. Pearse, Sophie Griswold, Desirree Pizarro & Walter D. Koenig
Oaks are foundational species in much of California, and many oak populations in the state may be in jeopardy due to a lack of recruitment of young trees. Despite considerable interest in this problem, there have been few comprehensive surveys of all stages of oak development. We surveyed all stages of three oaks: Quercus lobata, Q. douglasii, and Q. agrifolia in a forest plot with mixed land-use in central coastal California. We found abundant seedlings...

Data from: Differential introgression in a mosaic hybrid zone reveals candidate barrier genes

Erica L. Larson, Jose A. Andres, Steven M. Bogdanowicz & Richard G. Harrison
Hybrid zones act as genomic sieves; although globally advantageous alleles will spread throughout the zone and neutral alleles can be freely exchanged between species, introgression will be restricted for genes that contribute to reproductive barriers or local adaptation. Seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) are known to contribute to reproductive barriers in insects and have been proposed as candidate barrier genes in the hybridizing field crickets G. pennsylvanicus and G. firmus. Here, we have used 125 SNPs...

Data from: The fate of phosphorus fertilizer in Amazon soya bean fields

Shelby H. Riskin, Stephen Porder, Christopher Neill, Adelaine Michela E Silva Figueira, Carmen Tubbesing & Natalie Mahowald
Fertilizer-intensive soya bean agriculture has recently expanded in southeastern Amazônia, and whereas intensive fertilizer use in the temperate zone has led to widespread eutrophication of freshwater ecosystems, the effects in tropical systems are less well understood. We examined the fate of fertilizer P by comparing P forms and budgets across a chronosequence of soya bean fields (converted to soya beans between 2003 and 2008) and forests on an 800 km2 soya bean farm in Mato...

Data from: Ancient host shifts followed by host conservatism in a group of ant parasitoids

Elizabeth A. Murray, Andrew E. Carmichael & John M. Heraty
While ant colonies serve as host to a diverse array of myrmecophiles, few parasitoids are able to exploit this vast resource. A notable exception is the wasp family Eucharitidae, which is the only family of insects known to exclusively parasitize ants. Worldwide, approximately 700 Eucharitidae species attack five subfamilies across the ant phylogeny. Our goal is to uncover the pattern of eucharitid diversification, including timing of key evolutionary events, biogeographic patterns and potential cophylogeny with...

Data from: The evolutionary origins of modularity

Jeff Clune, Jean-Baptiste Mouret & Hod Lipson
A central biological question is how natural organisms are so evolvable (capable of quickly adapting to new environments). A key driver of evolvability is the widespread modularity of biological networks--their organization as functional, sparsely connected subunits--but there is no consensus regarding why modularity itself evolved. While most hypotheses assume indirect selection for evolvability, here we demonstrate that the ubiquitous, direct selection pressure to reduce the cost of connections between network nodes causes the emergence of...

Data from: Biodiversity ensures plant-pollinator phenological synchrony against climate change

Ignasi Bartomeus, Mia G. Park, Jason Gibbs, Bryan N. Danforth, Alan N. Lakso & Rachael Winfree
Climate change has the potential to alter the phenological synchrony between interacting mutualists, such as plants and their pollinators. However, high levels of biodiversity might buffer the negative effects of species-specific phenological shifts and maintain synchrony at the community level, as predicted by the biodiversity insurance hypothesis. Here, we explore how biodiversity might enhance and stabilise phenological synchrony between a valuable crop, apple and its native pollinators. We combine 46 years of data on apple...

Data from: Dissecting genome-wide association signals for loss-of-function phenotypes in sorghum flavonoid pigmentation traits

Geoffrey P. Morris, Davina H. Rhodes, Zachary Brenton, Punna Ramu, Vinayan Madhumal Thayil, Santosh Deshpande, C. Thomas Hash, Charlotte Acharya, Sharon E. Mitchell, Edward S. Buckler, Jianming Yu & Stephen Kresovich
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful method to dissect the genetic basis of traits, though in practice the effects of complex genetic architecture and population structure remain poorly understood. To compare mapping strategies we dissect the genetic control of flavonoid pigmentation traits in the cereal grass sorghum using high-resolution genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) SNP markers. Studying the grain tannin trait, we find that General Linear Models (GLM) are not able to precisely map tan1-a, a known...

Data from: Genomics assisted ancestry deconvolution in grape

Jason K. Sawler, Bruce Reisch, Mallikarjuna K. Aradhya, Bernard Prins, Gan-Yuan Zhong, Heidi Schwaninger, Charles Simon, Edward Buckler, Sean Myles & Jason Sawler
The genus Vitis (the grapevine) is a group of highly diverse, diploid woody perennial vines consisting of approximately 60 species from across the northern hemisphere. It is the world’s most valuable horticultural crop with ~8 million hectares planted, most of which is processed into wine. To gain insights into the use of wild Vitis species during the past century of interspecific grape breeding and to provide a foundation for marker-assisted breeding programmes, we present a...

Data from: Long-term endemism of two highly divergent lineages of the amphibian-killing fungus in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil

David Rodriguez, Carlos G. Becker, Nadya C. Pupin, Célio F. B. Haddad & Kelly R. Zamudio
The recent global spread of the amphibian-killing fungus [Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd)] has been closely tied to anthropogenic activities; however, regional patterns of spread are not completely understood. Using historical samples, we can test whether Bd was a spreading or endemic pathogen in a region within a particular time frame, because those two disease states provide different predictions for the regional demographic dynamics and population genetics of Bd. Testing historical patterns of pathogen prevalence and population...

Data from: Structure of a mosaic hybrid zone between the field crickets Gryllus firmus and G. pennsylvanicus

Erica L. Larson, C. Guilherme Becker, Eliana R. Bondra & Richard G. Harrison
Hybrid zones provide insight into the nature of species boundaries and the evolution of barriers to gene exchange. Characterizing multiple regions within hybrid zones is essential for understanding both their history and current dynamics. Here, we describe a previously uncharacterized region of a well-studied hybrid zone between two species of field crickets, Gryllus pennsylvanicus and G. firmus. We use a combination of mitochondrial DNA sequencing, morphological data, and modeling of environmental variables to identify the...

Data from: Historical changes in northeastern US bee pollinators related to shared ecological traits

Ignasi Bartomeus, John S. Ascher, Jason Gibbs, Bryan N. Danforth, David L. Wagner, Shannon M. Hedtke & Rachael Winfree
Pollinators such as bees are essential to the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. However, despite concerns about a global pollinator crisis, long-term data on the status of bee species are limited. We present a long-term study of relative rates of change for an entire regional bee fauna in the northeastern United States, based on >30,000 museum records representing 438 species. Over a 140-y period, aggregate native species richness weakly decreased, but richness declines were significant only...

Data from: Self-recruitment in a Caribbean reef fish: a method for approximating dispersal kernels accounting for seascape

Cassidy C. D'Aloia, Steven M. Bogdanowicz, John E. Majoris, Richard G. Harrison & Peter M. Buston
Characterizing patterns of larval dispersal is essential to understanding the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of marine metapopulations. Recent research has measured local dispersal within populations, but the development of marine dispersal kernels from empirical data remains a challenge. We propose a framework to move beyond point estimates of dispersal towards the approximation of a simple dispersal kernel, based on the hypothesis that the structure of the seascape is a primary predictor of realized dispersal patterns....

Data from: Genomic architecture of adaptive color pattern divergence and convergence in Heliconius butterflies

Megan A. Supple, Heather M. Hines, Kanchon K. Dasmahapatra, James J. Lewis, Dahlia M. Nielsen, Christine Lavoie, David A. Ray, Camilo Salazar, W. Owen McMillan & Brian A. Counterman
Identifying the genetic changes driving adaptive variation in natural populations is key to understanding the origins of biodiversity. The mosaic of mimetic wing patterns in Heliconius butterflies makes an excellent system for exploring adaptive variation using next-generation sequencing. In this study, we use a combination of techniques to annotate the genomic interval modulating red color pattern variation, identify a narrow region responsible for adaptive divergence and convergence in Heliconius wing color patterns, and explore the...

Data from: Predicting novel trophic interactions in a non-native world

Ian S. Pearse & Florian Altermatt
Humans are altering the global distributional ranges of plants, while their co-evolved herbivores are frequently left behind. Native herbivores often colonise non-native plants, potentially reducing invasion success or causing economic loss to introduced agricultural crops. We developed a predictive model to forecast novel interactions and verified it with a data set containing hundreds of observed novel plant–insect interactions. Using a food network of 900 native European butterfly and moth species and 1944 native plants, we...

Data from: Patterns of population structure for inshore bottlenose dolphins along the eastern United States

Vince P. Richards, Thomas W. Greig, Patricia A. Fair, Stephen D. McCulloch, Christine Politz, Ada Natoli, Carlos A. Driscoll, A. Russell Hoelzel, Victor David, Gregory D. Bossart & Jose V. Lopez
Globally distributed, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) is found in a range of offshore and coastal habitats. Using 15 microsatellite loci and mtDNA control region sequences, we investigated patterns of genetic differentiation among putative populations along the eastern US shoreline (the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, and Charleston Harbor, South Carolina) (microsatellite analyses: n = 125, mtDNA analyses: n = 132). We further utilized the mtDNA to compare these populations with those from the Northwest Atlantic,...

Data from: Adaptive evolution during an ongoing range expansion: the invasive bank vole (Myodes glareolus) in Ireland.

Thomas A. White, Sarah E. Perkins, Gerald Heckel & Jeremy B. Searle
Range expansions are extremely common, but have only recently begun to attract attention in terms of their genetic consequences. As populations expand, demes at the wave front experience strong genetic drift, which is expected to reduce genetic diversity and potentially cause 'allele surfing', where alleles may become fixed over a wide geographic area even if their effects are deleterious. Previous simulation models show that range expansions can generate very strong selective gradients on dispersal, reproduction,...

Data from: Understanding the basis of diminished gene flow between hybridizing chromosome races of the house mouse

Mabel D. Giménez, Thomas A. White, Heidi C. Hauffe, Thadsin Panithanarak & Jeremy B. Searle
Speciation may be promoted in hybrid zones if there is an interruption to gene flow between the hybridizing forms. For hybridizing chromosome races of the house mouse in Valtellina (Italy) distinguished by whole-arm chromosomal rearrangements, previous studies have shown that there is greater interruption to gene flow at the centromeres of chromosomes that differ between the races than at distal regions of the same chromosome or at the centromeres of other chromosomes. Here, by increasing...

Data from: Vitis phylogenomics: hybridization intensities from a SNP array outperform genotype calls

Allison J. Miller, Naim Matasci, Heidi Schwaninger, Mallikarjuna K. Aradhya, Bernard Prins, Gan-Yuan Zhong, Charles Simon, Edward S. Buckler & Sean Myles
Understanding relationships among species is a fundamental goal of evolutionary biology. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified through next generation sequencing and related technologies enable phylogeny reconstruction by providing unprecedented numbers of characters for analysis. One approach to SNP-based phylogeny reconstruction is to identify SNPs in a subset of individuals, and then to compile SNPs on an array that can be used to genotype additional samples at hundreds or thousands of sites simultaneously. Although powerful and...

Data from: Kin-bias, breeding site selection, and female fitness in a cannibalistic Neotropical frog

Pavitra Muralidhar, Fábio P. De Sá, Célio F. B. Haddad & Kelly R. Zamudio
Resource availability influences sexual selection within populations and determines whether behaviours such as territoriality or resource sharing are adaptive. In Thoropa taophora, a frog endemic to the Atlantic Coastal Rainforest of Brazil, males compete for and defend limited breeding sites while females often share breeding sites with other females; however, sharing breeding sites may involve costs due to cannibalism by conspecific tadpoles. We studied a breeding population of T. taophora to determine (i) whether this...

Data from: Gene flow and the maintenance of species boundaries

Erica L. Larson, Thomas A. White, Charles L. Ross & Richard G. Harrison
Hybrid zones are regions where individuals from genetically differentiated populations meet and mate, resulting in at least some offspring of mixed ancestry. Patterns of gene flow (introgression) in hybrid zones vary across the genome, allowing assessment of the role of individual genes or genome regions in reproductive isolation. Here, we document patterns of introgression between two recently diverged species of field crickets. We sample at a very fine spatial scale and genotype crickets for 110...

Data from: The influence sampling design on species tree inference: a new relationship for the New World chickadees (Aves: Poecile)

Rebecca Brown Harris, Matthew D. Carling & Irby J. Lovette
In this study, we explore the long-standing issue of how many loci are needed to infer accurate phylogenetic relationships, and whether loci with particular attributes (i.e., parsimony informativeness, variability, gene tree resolution) outperform others. To do so, we use an empirical dataset consisting of the seven species of chickadees (Aves: Paridae), an analytically tractable, recently diverged group, and well studied ecologically but lacking a nuclear phylogeny. We estimate relationships using 40 nuclear loci and mitochondrial...

Data from: Geometric morphometric character suites as phylogenetic data: extracting phylogenetic signal from gastropod shells

Ursula E. Smith & Jonathan R. Hendricks
Despite being the objects of numerous macroevolutionary studies, many of the best-represented constituents of the fossil record—including diverse examples such as foraminifera, brachiopods, and mollusks—have mineralized skeletons with limited discrete characteristics, making morphological phylogenies difficult to construct. In contrast to their paucity of phylogenetic characters, the mineralized structures (tests and shells) of these fossil groups frequently have distinctive shapes that have long proved useful for their classification. The recent introduction of methodologies for including continuous...

Data from: Antagonistic versus non-antagonistic models of balancing selection: characterizing the relative timescales and hitchhiking effects of partial selective sweeps

Tim Connallon & Andrew G. Clark
Antagonistically selected alleles-–those with opposing fitness effects between sexes, environments, or fitness components-–represent an important component of additive genetic variance in fitness-related traits, with stably balanced polymorphisms often hypothesized to contribute to observed quantitative genetic variation. Balancing selection hypotheses imply that intermediate-frequency alleles disproportionately contribute to genetic variance of life-history traits and fitness. Such alleles may also associate with population genetic footprints of recent selection, including reduced genetic diversity and inflated linkage disequilibrium at linked,...

Data from: A nonsemen copulatory fluid influences the outcome of sperm competition in Japanese quail.

Findley R. Finseth, Stephanie R. Iacovelli, Richard G. Harrison & Elizabeth K. Adkins-Regan
Sperm competition is a powerful and widespread evolutionary force that drives the divergence of behavioral, physiological, and morphological traits. Elucidating the mechanisms governing differential fertilization success is a fundamental question of sperm competition. Both sperm and non-sperm ejaculate components can influence sperm competition outcomes. Here, we investigate the role of a non-semen copulatory fluid in sperm competition. Male Japanese quail possess a gland that makes meringue-like foam. Males produce and store foam independent of sperm...

Data from: Tracking climate change in a dispersal-limited species: reduced spatial and genetic connectivity in a montane salamander

Guillermo Velo-Antón, Juan L. Parra, Gabriela Parra-Olea & Kelly R. Zamudio
Tropical montane taxa are often locally adapted to very specific climatic conditions, contributing to their lower dispersal potential across complex landscapes. Climate and landscape features in montane regions affect population genetic structure in predictable ways, yet few empirical studies quantify the effects of both factors in shaping genetic structure of montane-adapted taxa. Here, we considered temporal and spatial variability in climate to explain contemporary genetic differentiation between populations of the montane salamander, Pseudoeurycea leprosa. Specifically,...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    29

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    29

Affiliations

  • Cornell University
    29
  • University of Bern
    3
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    2
  • University of Montana
    2
  • Sao Paulo State University
    2
  • University of Wyoming
    2
  • Dalhousie University
    2
  • Durham University
    2
  • University of York
    2
  • Rutgers University
    2