29 Works

Data from: Ancient host shifts followed by host conservatism in a group of ant parasitoids

Elizabeth A. Murray, Andrew E. Carmichael & John M. Heraty
While ant colonies serve as host to a diverse array of myrmecophiles, few parasitoids are able to exploit this vast resource. A notable exception is the wasp family Eucharitidae, which is the only family of insects known to exclusively parasitize ants. Worldwide, approximately 700 Eucharitidae species attack five subfamilies across the ant phylogeny. Our goal is to uncover the pattern of eucharitid diversification, including timing of key evolutionary events, biogeographic patterns and potential cophylogeny with...

Data from: Differential introgression in a mosaic hybrid zone reveals candidate barrier genes

Erica L. Larson, Jose A. Andres, Steven M. Bogdanowicz & Richard G. Harrison
Hybrid zones act as genomic sieves; although globally advantageous alleles will spread throughout the zone and neutral alleles can be freely exchanged between species, introgression will be restricted for genes that contribute to reproductive barriers or local adaptation. Seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) are known to contribute to reproductive barriers in insects and have been proposed as candidate barrier genes in the hybridizing field crickets G. pennsylvanicus and G. firmus. Here, we have used 125 SNPs...

Data from: Genomics assisted ancestry deconvolution in grape

Jason K. Sawler, Bruce Reisch, Mallikarjuna K. Aradhya, Bernard Prins, Gan-Yuan Zhong, Heidi Schwaninger, Charles Simon, Edward Buckler, Sean Myles & Jason Sawler
The genus Vitis (the grapevine) is a group of highly diverse, diploid woody perennial vines consisting of approximately 60 species from across the northern hemisphere. It is the world’s most valuable horticultural crop with ~8 million hectares planted, most of which is processed into wine. To gain insights into the use of wild Vitis species during the past century of interspecific grape breeding and to provide a foundation for marker-assisted breeding programmes, we present a...

Data from: Historical changes in northeastern US bee pollinators related to shared ecological traits

Ignasi Bartomeus, John S. Ascher, Jason Gibbs, Bryan N. Danforth, David L. Wagner, Shannon M. Hedtke & Rachael Winfree
Pollinators such as bees are essential to the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. However, despite concerns about a global pollinator crisis, long-term data on the status of bee species are limited. We present a long-term study of relative rates of change for an entire regional bee fauna in the northeastern United States, based on >30,000 museum records representing 438 species. Over a 140-y period, aggregate native species richness weakly decreased, but richness declines were significant only...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    29

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    29

Affiliations

  • Cornell University
    29
  • University of Bern
    3
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    2
  • University of Montana
    2
  • Sao Paulo State University
    2
  • University of Wyoming
    2
  • Dalhousie University
    2
  • Durham University
    2
  • University of York
    2
  • Rutgers University
    2