3 Works

Data from: Analyses of phenotypic differentiations among South Georgian Diving Petrel (Pelecanoides georgicus) populations reveal an undescribed and highly endangered species from New Zealand

Johannes H. Fischer, Igor Debski, Colin M. Miskelly, Charles A. Bost, Aymeric Fromant, Alan J. D. Tennyson, Jake Tessler, Rosalind Cole, Johanna H. Hiscock, Graeme A. Taylor & Heiko U. Wittmer
Unresolved taxonomy of threatened species is problematic for conservation as the field relies on species being distinct taxonomic units. Differences in breeding habitat and results from a preliminary molecular analysis indicated that the New Zealand population of the South Georgian Diving Petrel (Pelecanoides georgicus) was a distinct, yet undescribed, species. We measured 11 biometric characters and scored eight plumage characters in 143 live birds and 64 study skins originating from most populations of P. georgicus,...

Data from: Genetic structure and shell shape variation within a rocky shore whelk suggests both diverging and constraining selection with gene flow

Michael R. Gemmell, Steven A. Trewick, James S. Crampton, Felix Vaux, Simon F.K. Hills, Elizabeth E. Daly, Bruce A. Marshall, Alan G. Beu, Mary Morgan-Richards & Simon F K Hills
Variation in snail shell shape has provided evolutionary biologists with excellent material for the study of local adaptation to local environments. However, assuming shell shape variation is evidence of distinct lineages (species) may have led to taxonomic inflation within some gastropod lineages. Here we compare shell shape variation and genetic structure of two independent lineages of New Zealand rocky shore whelks in order to understand the process that lead to an unusual disjunct distribution. We...

Data from: Subsistence practices, past biodiversity, and anthropogenic impacts revealed by New Zealand-wide ancient DNA survey

Frederik V. Seersholm, Theresa L. Cole, Alicia Grealy, Nicolas J. Rawlence, Karen Greig, Michael Knapp, Michael Stat, Anders J. Hansen, Luke J. Easton, Lara Shepherd, Alan J. D. Tennyson, R. Paul Scofield, Richard Walter & Michael Bunce
New Zealand’s geographic isolation, lack of native terrestrial mammals, and Gondwanan origins make it an ideal location to study evolutionary processes. However, since the archipelago was first settled by humans (c. 1280 AD), its unique biodiversity has been under pressure, and today an estimated 49% of the terrestrial avifauna is extinct. Current efforts to conserve the remaining fauna rely on a better understanding of the composition of past ecosystems, as well as the causes and...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
    3
  • Victoria University of Wellington
    1
  • University of Otago
    1
  • Macquarie University
    1
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1
  • Curtin University
    1
  • Landcare Research
    1
  • University of Copenhagen
    1
  • Department of Conservation
    1
  • GNS Science
    1