26 Works

Data from: Prediction of cooking time for soaked and unsoaked dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) using hyperspectral imaging technology

Fernando A. Mendoza, Jason A. Wiesinger, Renfu Lu, Susan Nchimbi-Msolla, Phillip N. Miklas, James D. Kelly & Karen A. Cichy
The cooking time of dry beans varies widely by genotype and is also influenced by the growing environment, storage conditions and cooking method. Thus, high throughput phenotyping methods to assess cooking time would be useful to breeders interested in developing cultivars with desired cooking time. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of hyperspectral imaging technology for predicting dry bean cooking time. Fourteen dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes with a wide...

Data from: ANDe™ : a fully integrated environmental DNA sampling system

Austen C. Thomas, Jesse Howard, Phong L. Nguyen, Tracie A. Seimon & Caren S. Goldberg
1. Species monitoring from environmental DNA (eDNA) is a powerful new technique for natural resource scientists and the number of research groups employing eDNA detection is growing rapidly. However, current eDNA sampling technologies consist mainly of do-it-yourself solutions, and the lack of purpose-built sampling equipment is limiting the efficiency and standardization of eDNA studies. 2. Here, we describe the first fully-integrated sampling system (ANDeTM) designed by a team of molecular ecologists and engineers for high-throughput...

Data from: Quantitative trait loci for cold tolerance in chickpea

Clarice J. Coyne, Deus Mugabe, Julia Piaskowski, Ping Zheng, Yu Ma, Erik Landry, Rebecca McGee, Dorrie Main, George Vandemark, Hongbin Zhang & Shahal Abbo
Fall-sown chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) yields are often double those of spring-sown chickpea in regions with Mediterranean climates that have mild winters. However, winter kill can limit the productivity of fall-sown chickpea. Developing cold-tolerant chickpea would allow the expansion of the current geographic range where chickpea is grown and also improve productivity. The objective of this study was to identify the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with cold tolerance in chickpea. An interspecific recombinant inbred...

Data from: Female ornamentation is associated with elevated aggression and testosterone in a tropical songbird

Erik D. Enbody, Jordan Boersma, Hubert Schwabl & Jordan Karubian
In males, testosterone plays a key role in ornament production and linking ornamentation with reproductive behaviors and other traits to produce an integrated phenotype. Less is known about whether females couple testosterone, ornamentation, and aggressive behaviors to achieve female-specific combinations of traits. Ornamentation in females may be the result of correlated expression with male ornamentation, or female traits could arise as the result of sex specific selection pressures. Resolving between these alternatives is necessary to...

Data from: Phenological responses of 215 moth species to interannual climate variation in the Pacific Northwest from 1895 through 2013

Julie A. Maurer, Jon H. Shepard, Lars G. Crabo, Paul C. Hammond, Richard S. Zack & Merrill A. Peterson
Climate change has caused shifts in the phenology and distributions of many species but comparing responses across species is challenged by inconsistencies in the methodology and taxonomic and temporal scope of individual studies. Natural history collections offer a rich source of data for examining phenological shifts for a large number of species. We paired specimen records from Pacific Northwest insect collections to climate data to analyze the responses of 215 moth species to interannual climate...

Data from: Impact of confinement housing on study end-points in the calf model of cryptosporidiosis

Geneva Graef, Natalie J. Hurst, Lance Kidder, Tracy L. Sy, Laura B. Goodman, Whitney D. Preston, Samuel L. M. Arnold & Jennifer A. Zambriski
Background: Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children < 5 years globally and the parasite genus Cryptosporidium is a leading cause of that diarrhea. The global disease burden attributable to cryptosporidiosis is substantial and the only approved chemotherapeutic, nitazoxanide, has poor efficacy in HIV positive children. Chemotherapeutic development is dependent on the calf model of cryptosporidiosis, which is the best approximation of human disease. However, the model is not consistently applied across...

Data from: Soil microbial communities alter conspecific and congeneric competition consistent with patterns of field coexistence in three Trifolium congeners

Andrew Siefert, Kenneth W. Zillig, Maren L. Friesen & Sharon Y. Strauss
1. Coexistence and diversity in plant communities depend upon outcomes of plant competition. Competition and coexistence can be mediated by abiotic soil nutrient differences as well as by soil microbial communities. The latter effects occur through various mechanisms including negative plant-soil feedbacks, when plants foster the build-up of specialized pathogenic microbes, which ultimately reduce conspecific, but not heterospecific, densities. Microbial mutualists can have generalized associations with host plants, and by associating with multiple species might...

Data from: Limited genetic evidence for host plant-related differentiation in the Western cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera: Tephritidae)

Gilbert Saint Jean, Glen R. Hood, Scott P. Egan, Thomas H.Q. Powell, Hannes Schuler, Meredith M. Doellman, Mary M. Glover, James J. Smith, Wee L. Yee, Robert B. Goughnour, Howard M.A. Thistlewood, Sheri A. Maxwell, Nusha Keyghobadi, Juan Rull, Martin Aluja, Jeffrey L. Feder & Thomas H. Q. Powell
The shift of the fruit fly Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) in the mid-1800s from downy hawthorn, Crataegus mollis (Torrey & Asa Gray) Scheele, to introduced domesticated apple, Malus domestica (Borkhausen), in the eastern USA is a model for ecological divergence with gene flow. A similar system may exist in the northwestern USA and British Columbia, Canada, where Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae) attacks the native bitter cherry Prunus emarginata (Douglas ex Hooker) Eaton (Rosaceae). Populations of...

Data from: Trade-offs for butterfly alpha and beta diversity in human-modified landscapes and tropical rainforests

Hemchandranauth Sambhu, Alliea Nankishore, Stephen M. Turton & Tobin D. Northfield
The accelerating expansion of human populations and associated economic activity across the globe have made maintaining large, intact natural areas increasingly challenging. The difficulty of preserving large intact landscapes in the presence of growing human populations has led to a growing emphasis on landscape approaches to biodiversity conservation with a complementary strategy focused on improving conservation in human-modified landscapes. This, in turn, is leading to intense debate about the effectiveness of biodiversity conservation in human-modified...

Data from: Bottlenecks and inbreeding depression in autotetraploids

Nathan C. Layman & Jeremiah W. Busch
Inbreeding depression is dependent on the ploidy of populations and can inhibit the evolution of selfing. While polyploids should generally harbor less inbreeding depression than diploids at equilibrium, it has been unclear whether this pattern holds in non-equilibrium conditions following bottlenecks. We use stochastic individual based simulations to determine the effects of population bottlenecks on inbreeding depression in diploids and autotetraploids, in addition to cases where neo-autotetraploids form from the union of unreduced gametes. With...

Data from: Genetic diversity, breed composition and admixture of Kenyan domestic pigs

Fidalis D. Mujibi, Edward Okoth, Evans K. Cheruiyot, Cynthia Onzere, Richard P. Bishop, Eric M. Fèvre, Lian Thomas, Charles Masembe, Graham Plastow & Max Rothschild
The genetic diversity of African pigs, whether domestic or wild has not been widely studied and there is very limited published information available. Available data suggests that African domestic pigs originate from different domestication centers as opposed to international commercial breeds. We evaluated two domestic pig populations in Western Kenya, in order to characterize the genetic diversity, breed composition and admixture of the pigs in an area known to be endemic for African swine fever...

Data from: Regional variation in drivers of connectivity for two frog species (Rana pretiosa and R. luteiventris) from the U.S. Pacific Northwest

Jeane M. Robertson, Melanie A. Murphy, Christopher A. Pearl, Michael J. Adams, Monica I. Páez-Vacas, Susan M. Haig, David S. Pilliod, Andrew Storfer & W. Chris Funk
Comparative landscape genetics has uncovered high levels of variation in which landscape factors affect connectivity among species and regions. However, the relative importance of species traits vs. environmental variation for predicting landscape patterns of connectivity is unresolved. We provide evidence from a landscape genetics study of two sister taxa of frogs, the Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) and the Columbia spotted frog (R. luteiventris) in Oregon and Idaho, USA. Rana pretiosa is relatively more dependent...

Data from: Weed control with Bicyclopyrone + Bromoxynil in wheat

Carolina San Martín, Drew J. Lyon, Jennifer Gourlie, Henry C. Wetzel & Judit Barroso
Chemical weed control options in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cropping systems of the Pacific Northwest (PNW) are currently limited due to the presence of resistant weed biotypes. The efficacy of a new post-emergence herbicide in wheat, bicyclopyrone + bromoxynil (Talinor®), was evaluated for mayweed chamomile (Anthemis cotula L.) and prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola L.) control in eastern Washington and Oregon in 2016 and 2017. Bicyclopyrone + bromoxynil provided superior control of mayweed chamomile in winter...

Data from: The spatial structure of phylogenetic and functional diversity in the United States and Canada: an example using the sedge family (Cyperaceae)

Daniel Spalink, Jocelyn Pender, Marcial Escudero, Andrew L. Hipp, Eric H. Roalson, Julian R. Starr, Marcia J. Waterway, Lynn Bohs & Kenneth J. Sytsma
Systematically quantifying diversity across landscapes is necessary to understand how clade history and ecological heterogeneity contribute to the origin, distribution, and maintenance of biodiversity. Here, we chart the spatial structure of diversity among all species in the sedge family (Cyperaceae) throughout the USA and Canada. We first identify areas of remarkable species richness, phylogenetic diversity, and functional trait diversity, and highlight regions of conservation priority. We then test predictions about the spatial structure of this...

Data from: Functional group, biomass, and climate change effects on ecological drought in semiarid grasslands

Scott D. Wilson, Daniel R. Schlaepfer, John B. Bradford, William K. Lauenroth, Michael C. Duniway, Sonia A. Hall, Khishigbayar Jamiyansharav, G. Jia, Ariuntsetseg Lkhagva, Seth M. Munson, David A. Pyke & Britta Tietjen
Water relations in plant communities are influenced both by contrasting functional groups (grasses, shrubs) and by climate change via complex effects on interception, uptake and transpiration. We modelled the effects of functional group replacement and biomass increase, both of which can be outcomes of invasion and vegetation management, and climate change on ecological drought (soil water potential below which photosynthesis stops) in 340 semiarid grassland sites over 30-year periods. Relative to control vegetation (climate and...

Data from: Mutualists stabilize coexistence of congeneric legumes

Andrew Siefert, Kenneth W. Zillig, Maren L. Friesen & Sharon Y. Strauss
Coexistence requires that stabilizing niche differences, which cause species to limit themselves more than others, outweigh relative fitness differences that cause competitive exclusion. Interactions with shared mutualists, which can differentially affect host fitness and change in magnitude with host frequency, can satisfy these conditions for coexistence, yet empirical tests of mutualist effects on relative fitness and stabilizing niche differences are largely lacking within the framework of coexistence theory. Here, we show that N-fixing rhizobial mutualists...

Data from: Fungal endophyte‐infected leaf litter alters in‐stream microbial communities and negatively influences aquatic fungal sporulation

Emily R. Wolfe, Brett S. Younginger & Carri J. LeRoy
Endophytes are ubiquitous plant‐associated microbes and although they have the potential to alter the decomposition of infected leaf litter, this has not been well‐studied. The endophyte Rhytisma punctatum infects the leaves of Acer macrophyllum (bigleaf maple), causing the appearance of black ‘tar spots’ that persist in senesced leaves. Other foliar fungi also cause visible damage in healthy tissues of this host plant system including an unidentified bullseye‐shaped lesion, common in western Washington. Using three treatments...

Data from: Accounting for disturbance history in models: using remote sensing to constrain carbon and nitrogen pool spin‐up

Erin J. Hanan, Christina Tague, Janet Choate, Mingliang Liu, Crystal Kolden & Jennifer Adam
Disturbances such as wildfire, insect outbreaks, and forest clearing, play an important role in regulating carbon, nitrogen, and hydrologic fluxes in terrestrial watersheds. Evaluating how watersheds respond to disturbance requires understanding mechanisms that interact over multiple spatial and temporal scales. Simulation modeling is a powerful tool for bridging these scales; however, model projections are limited by uncertainties in the initial state of plant carbon and nitrogen stores. Watershed models typically use one of two methods...

Data from: Central place foragers and moving stimuli: a hidden-state model to discriminate the processes affecting movement

Enrico Pirotta, Ewan W.J. Edwards, Leslie New, Paul M. Thompson & Ewan W. J. Edwards
1. Human activities can influence the movement of organisms, either repelling or attracting individuals depending on whether they interfere with natural behavioural patterns or enhance access to food. To discern the processes affecting such interactions, an appropriate analytical approach must reflect the motivations driving behavioural decisions at multiple scales. 2. In this study, we developed a modelling framework for the analysis of foraging trips by central place foragers. By recognising the distinction between movement phases...

Data from: State-space modelling of the flight behaviour of a soaring bird provides new insights to migratory strategies

Enrico Pirotta, Todd Katzner, Tricia A. Miller, Adam E. Duerr, Melissa A. Braham & Leslie New
1. Characterizing the spatiotemporal variation of animal behaviour can elucidate the way individuals interact with their environment and allocate energy. Increasing sophistication of tracking technologies paired with novel analytical approaches allows the characterisation of movement dynamics even when an individual is not directly observable. 2. In this study, high-resolution movement data collected via global positioning system (GPS) tracking in three dimensions were paired with topographical information and used in a Bayesian state-space model to describe...

Data from: Intercomparison of photogrammetry software for three-dimensional vegetation modelling

Alexandra Probst, Demetrios Gatziolis & Nikolay Strigul
Photogrammetry-based 3D reconstruction of objects is becoming increasingly appealing in research areas unrelated to computer vision. It has the potential to facilitate the assessment of forest inventory-related parameters by enabling or expediting resource measurements in the field. We hereby compare several implementations of photogrammetric algorithms (CMVS/PMVS, CMPMVS, MVE, OpenMVS, SURE, and Agisoft PhotoScan) with respect to their performance in vegetation assessment. The evaluation is based on (a) a virtual scene where the precise location and...

Data from: Increasing photoperiod stimulates initiation of spring migratory behaviour and physiology in a facultative migrant, the pine siskin

Ashley R. Robart, Mali M.K. McGuire, Heather E. Watts & Mali M. K. McGuire
The transition to a migratory state involves coordinated changes in physiology and behaviour. In species with regular, predictable (obligate) migrations, increasing day length triggers the expression of a spring migratory state and androgens play an important role in stimulating its development. In contrast, we know very little about the environmental cues and endocrine mechanisms that regulate migration in species with less predictable (facultative) migrations. Here, we tested whether photoperiod stimulates a migratory state in a...

Data from: Phylogenomic analyses reveal extensive gene flow within the magic flowers (Achimenes)

Wade R. Roberts & Eric H. Roalson
Premise of the study: The Neotropical Gesneriaceae is a lineage known for its colorful and diverse flowers, as well as an extensive history of intra- and intergeneric hybridization, particularly among Achimenes (the magic flowers) and other members of the subtribe Gloxiniinae. Despite numerous studies seeking to elucidate the evolutionary relationships of these lineages, relatively few have sought to infer specific patterns of gene flow despite evidence of widespread hybridization. Methods: To explore the utility of...

Data from: Habitat structure modifies microclimate: an approach for mapping fine-scale thermal refuge

Charlotte R. Milling, Janet L. Rachlow, Peter J. Olsoy, Mark A. Chappell, Timothy R. Johnson, Jennifer S. Forbey, Lisa A. Shipley & Daniel H. Thornton
1. Contemporary techniques predicting habitat suitability under climate change projections often underestimate availability of thermal refuges. Habitat structure contributes to thermal heterogeneity at a variety of spatial scales, but quantifying microclimates at organism‐relevant resolutions remains a challenge. Landscapes that appear homogeneous at large scales may offer patchily distributed thermal refuges at finer scales. 2. We quantified the relationship between vegetation structure and the thermal environment at a scale relevant to small, terrestrial animals using a...

Data from: Sex bias in ability to cope with cancer: Tasmanian devils and facial tumour disease.

Manuel Ruiz-Aravena, Menna E. Jones, Scott Carver, Sergio Estay, Camila Espejo, Andrew Storfer & Rodrigo K. Hamede
Knowledge of the ecological dynamics between hosts and pathogens during the initial stages of disease emergence is crucial to understanding the potential for evolution of new interspecific interactions. Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) populations have declined precipitously owing to infection by a transmissible cancer (devil facial tumour disease, DFTD) that emerged approximately 20 years ago. Since the emergence of DFTD, and as the disease spreads across Tasmania, the number of devil has dropped up to 90%...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    26

Affiliations

  • Washington State University
    26
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    3
  • United States Geological Survey
    3
  • University of Idaho
    3
  • Michigan State University
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Oregon State University
    2
  • University of Wyoming
    2
  • University College Cork
    2
  • Colorado State University
    2