30 Works

Agricultural intensification heightens food safety risks posed by wild birds

Olivia Smith, Amanda Edworthy, Joseph Taylor, Matthew Jones, Aaron Tormanen, Christina M. Kennedy, Zhen Fu, Christopher Latimer, Kevin Cornell, Lucas Michelotti, Chika Sato, Tobin Northfield, William Snyder & Jeb Owen
1. Agricultural intensification and simplification are key drivers of recent declines in wild bird populations, heightening the need to better balance conservation with food production. This is hindered, however, by perceptions that birds threaten food safety. While birds are known reservoirs of foodborne pathogens, there remains uncertainty about the links between landscape context, farming practices, and actual crop contamination by birds. 2. Here, we examine relationships between landscape context, farming practices, and pathogen contamination by...

Datasets for Mixed support for gene flow as a constraint to local adaptation and contributor to the limited geographic range of an endemic salamander

Steven Micheletti
Understanding mechanisms that underlie species range limits is at the core of evolutionary ecology. Asymmetric gene flow between larger core populations and smaller edge populations can swamp local adaptation at the range edge and inhibit further range expansion. However, empirical tests of this theory are exceedingly rare. We tested the hypothesis that asymmetric gene flow can constrain local adaptation and thereby species’ range limits in an endemic US salamander (Ambystoma barbouri) by determining if gene...

Coevolution, diversification, and alternative states in two-trophic communities

Tobin Northfield, Jörgen Ripa, Lucas Nell & Anthony Ives
Single-trait eco-evolutionary models of arms races between consumers and their resource species often show inhibition rather than promotion of community diversification. In contrast, modeling arms races involving multiple traits, we found that arms races can promote diversification when trade-off costs among traits make simultaneous investment in multiple traits either more beneficial or more costly. Coevolution between resource and consumer species generates an adaptive landscape for each, with the configuration giving predictable suites of consumer and...

Plant evolution can mediate negative effects from honey bees on wild pollinators

James Milner, Tobin Northfield, Elias Bloom & David Crowder
1. Pollinators are introduced to agroecosystems to provide pollination services. Introductions of managed pollinators often promote ecosystem services, but it remains largely unknown whether they also affect evolutionary mutualisms between wild pollinators and plants. 2. Here we developed a model to assess effects of managed honey bees on mutualisms between plants and wild pollinators. Our model tracked how interactions among wild pollinators and honey bees affected pollinator and plant populations. 3. We show that when...

Data from: Disease swamps molecular signatures of genetic-environmental associations to abiotic factors in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) populations

Alexandra Kaye Fraik, Mark Margres, Brendan Epstein, Soraia Barbosa, Menna Jones, Sarah Hendricks, Barbara Schonfeld, Amanda R. Stahlke, Anne Veillet, Rodrigo Hamede, Hamish McCallum, Elisa Lopez-Contreras, Samantha J Kallinen, Paul A Hohenlohe, Joanna Kelley & Andrew Storfer
Landscape genomics studies focus on identifying candidate genes under selection via spatial variation in abiotic environmental variables, but rarely by biotic factors such as disease. The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is found only on the environmentally heterogeneous island of Tasmania and is threatened with extinction by a nearly 100% fatal, transmissible cancer, devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). Devils persist in regions of long-term infection despite epidemiological model predictions of species’ extinction, suggesting possible adaptation to...

Limited divergent adaptation despite a substantial environmental cline in wild pea

Timo Hellwig, Shahal Abbo, Amir Sherman, Clarice Coyne, Yehoshua Saranga, Doreen Main, Ping Zheng, Simcha Lev-Yadun & Ron Ophir
Isolation by environment (IBE) is a wide spread phenomenon in nature. It is commonly expected that the degree of differences among environments is proportional to the level of divergence between populations in these environments. Consequentially, it is assumed that species’ genetic diversity displays pattern of IBE in the presence of a strong environmental cline if geneflow does not mitigate isolation. We tested this common assumption by analyzing the genetic diversity and demographic history of Pisum...

Thermal constraints on energy balance, behavior, and spatial distribution of grizzly bears

Savannah Rogers, Charles Robbins, Paul Mathewson, Anthony Carnahan, Frank Van Manen, Mark Haroldson, Warren Porter, Taylor Rogers, Terence Soule & Ryan Long
1. Heat dissipation limit theory posits that energy available for growth and reproduction in endotherms is limited by their ability to dissipate heat. In mammals, endogenous heat production increases markedly during gestation and lactation, and thus female mammals may be subject to greater thermal constraints on energy expenditure than males. Such constraints likely have important implications for behavior and population performance in a warming climate. 2. We used a mechanistic simulation model based on first...

Data from: Disturbance detection in Landsat time series is influenced by tree mortality agent and severity, not by prior disturbance

Kyle Rodman, Robert Andrus, Thomas Veblen & Sarah Hart
Landsat time series (LTS) and associated change detection algorithms are useful for monitoring the effects of global change on Earth’s ecosystems. Because LTS algorithms can be easily applied across broad areas, they are commonly used to map changes in forest structure due to wildfire, insect attack, and other important drivers of tree mortality. But factors such as initial forest density, tree mortality agent, and disturbance severity (i.e., percent tree mortality) influence patterns of surface reflectance...

Data from: Evidence for spatial clines and mixed geographic modes of speciation for North American cherry-infesting Rhagoletis (Diptera:Tephritidae) flies

Meredith Doellman, Gilbert Saint Jean, Scott Egan, Thomas Powell, Glen Hood, Hannes Schuler, Daniel Bruzzese, Mary Glover, James Smith, Wee Yee, Robert Goughnour, Juan Rull, Martin Aluja & Jeffrey Feder
An important criterion for understanding speciation is the geographic context of population divergence. Three major modes of allopatric, parapatric, and sympatric speciation define the extent of spatial overlap and gene flow between diverging populations. However, mixed modes of speciation are also possible, whereby populations experience periods of allopatry, parapatry, and/or sympatry at different times as they diverge. Here, we report clinal patterns of variation for 21 nuclear-encoded microsatellites and a wing spot phenotype for cherry-infesting...

Datasets for: Primary production and habitat stability organize marine communities

Alli Cramer & Steve Katz
Aim: The emergence of pattern in the natural world can carry important messages about underlying processes. For example, collections of broadly similar terrestrial ecosystems have historically been categorized as biomes – groupings of systems which sort along energetic and structural process axes. In marine systems however, a similar classification of biomes has not emerged. The aim here is to develop an effective classification scheme for marine biomes and communities. Approach: Candidate predictor variables that could...

Data from: Switchgrass rhizosphere metabolite chemistry driven by nitrogen availability

Darian Smercina, Alan W Bowsher, Sarah E Evans, Maren L Friesen, Elizabeth K Eder, David W Hoyt & Lisa K Tiemann
Plants and soil microorganisms interact closely in the rhizosphere where plants may exchange carbon (C) for functional benefits from the microbial community. For example, the bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is thought to exchange root-exuded C for nitrogen (N) fixed by diazotrophs (free-living N-fixers). However, this interaction is not well characterized and it is not known how or if switchgrass responds to diazotrophs or their activity. To explore this question, we assessed rhizosphere metabolite chemistry...

Do Synthesis Centers Synthesize? A Semantic Analysis of Topical Diversity in Research

Edward Hackett, Erin Leahy, John Parker, Ismael Rafols, Stephanie Hampton, Ugo Corte, Diego Chavarro, John Drake, Bart Penders, Laura Sheble, Niki Vermeulen & Todd Vision
Synthesis centers are a form of scientific organization that catalyzes and supports research that integrates diverse theories, methods and data across spatial or temporal scales to increase the generality, parsimony, applicability, or empirical soundness of scientific explanations. Synthesis working groups are a distinctive form of scientific collaboration that produce consequential, high-impact publications. But no one has asked if synthesis working groups synthesize: are their publications substantially more diverse than others, and if so, in what...

Data from: Intra-specific variation in tree growth responses to neighborhood composition and seasonal drought in a tropical forest

Jie Yang, Xiaoyang Song, Jenny Zambrano, Yuxin Chen, Min Cao, Xiaobao Deng, Wenfu Zhang, Xiaofei Yang, Guocheng Zhang, Yong Tang & Nathan Swenson
1. Functional traits are expected to provide insights into the abiotic and biotic drivers of plant demography. However, successfully linking traits to plant demographic performance likely requires the consideration of important contextual and individual-level information that is often ignored in trait-based ecology. 2. Here, we modeled 8 years of growth from 1,138 individual trees from 36 tropical rain forest species. We compared models of tree growth parameterized using individual-level versus species mean trait data. We...

Supplemental materials for: Peri- and post-pubertal estrogen exposures of female mice optimize uterine responses later in life

Sylvia Hewitt, Marleny Carmona, Grace Foley, Lauren Donoghue, Sydney Lierz, Wipawee Winuthayanon & Kenneth Korach
At birth, all female mice, including those that either lack estrogen receptor α (ERα-knockout) or that express mutated forms of ERα (AF2ERKI), have a hypoplastic uterus. However, uterine growth and development that normally accompanies pubertal maturation does not occur in ERα-knockout or AF2ERKI mice, indicating ERα mediated estrogen signaling is essential for this process. Mice that lack Cyp19 (aromatase, ArKO mice), an enzyme critical for estrogen (E2) synthesis, are unable to make E2, and lack...

Landscape context mediates the physiological stress response of birds to farmland diversification

Christopher Latimer, Olivia Smith, Joseph Taylor, Amanda Edworthy, Jeb Owen, William Snyder & Christina M. Kennedy
1. Farmland diversification practices are increasingly adopted to help reverse biodiversity declines in agroecosystems. However, evidence for the effectiveness of this approach often comes from documenting the species attracted to particular farming systems or landscapes, rather than their underlying physiological states that ultimately determine population growth or decline over the longer term. 2. Across 38 organic, mixed-produce farms spanning the U.S. west coast, we quantified three physiological biomarkers that are widely used to capture variation...

Decreased coevolutionary potential and increased symbiont fecundity during the biological invasion of a legume-rhizobium mutualism

Camille Wendlandt, Emily Helliwell, Miles Roberts, Kyle Nguyen, Maren Friesen, Eric Von Wettberg, Paul Price, Joel Griffitts & Stephanie Porter
Although most invasive species engage in mutualism, we know little about how mutualism evolves as partners colonize novel environments. Selection on cooperation and standing genetic variation for mutualism traits may differ between a mutualism's invaded and native ranges, which could alter cooperation and coevolutionary dynamics. To test for such differences, we compare mutualism traits between invaded- and native-range host-symbiont genotype combinations of the weedy legume, Medicago polymorpha, and its nitrogen-fixing rhizobium symbiont, Ensifer medicae, which...

Data from: Experimental amelioration of harsh weather speeds growth and development in a tropical montane songbird

Adam Mitchell, Jordan Boersma, Anthonio Anthony, Kanehiro Kitayama & Thomas Martin
Organisms living at high elevations generally grow and develop slower than those at lower elevations. Slow montane ontogeny is thought to be an evolved adaptation to harsh environments that improve juvenile quality via physiological tradeoffs. However, slower montane ontogeny may also reflect proximate influences of harsh weather on parental care and offspring development. We experimentally heated and protected nests from rain to ameliorate harsh montane weather conditions for Mountain Blackeyes (Chlorocharis emiliae), a montane songbird...

Data from: Testosterone regulates CYP2J19-linked carotenoid signal expression in male red-backed fairywrens (Malurus melanocephalus)

Sarah Khalil, Joseph Welklin, Kevin McGraw, Jordan Boersma, Hubert Schwabl, Michael Webster & Jordan Karubian
Carotenoid pigments produce most red, orange, and yellow colours in vertebrates. This coloration can serve as an honest signal of quality that mediates social and mating interactions, but our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that control carotenoid signal production, including how different physiological pathways interact to shape and maintain these signals, remains incomplete. We investigated the role of testosterone in mediating gene expression associated with a red plumage sexual signal in red-backed fairywrens (Malurus melanocephalus)....

Famine related mortality in early life and accelerated life histories in 19th Century Belgium

Katharina Pink, Robert Quinlan & Saskia Hin
Density-dependent and extrinsic mortality are predicted to accelerate reproductive maturation. The first 5 years of life is a proposed sensitive period for life-history regulation. This study examines the ways in which local mortality during this sensitive period was related to subsequent marriage timing in 19th Century Belgium (N women= 11,892; N men=14,140). Local mortality during the sensitive period was inversely associated with age at first marriage for men and women controlling for literacy, occupational status,...

Westward range expansion from middle latitudes explains the Mississippi River discontinuity in a forest herb of eastern North America

Carly Prior, Nate Layman, Matthew Koski, Laura Galloway & Jeremiah Busch
It is often expected that temperate plants have expanded their geographic ranges northward from primarily southern refugia. Evidence for this hypothesis is mixed in eastern North American species, and there is increasing support for colonization from middle latitudes. We studied genome-wide patterns of variation in RADseq loci to test hypotheses concerning range expansion in a North American forest herb (Campanula americana). First, spatial patterns of genetic differentiation were determined. Then phylogenetic relationships and divergence times...

When waterholes get busy, rare interactions thrive: Photographic evidence of a jaguar (Panthera onca) killing an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis)

Lucy Perera-Romero, Rony García-Anleu, Roan McNab & Daniel Thornton
During a camera trap survey conducted in Guatemala in the 2019 dry season, we documented a jaguar killing an ocelot at a waterhole with high mammal activity. During severe droughts, the probability of aggressive interactions between carnivores might increase when fixed, valuable resources such as water cannot be easily partitioned.

US Pacific Northwest bread wheat variety acreages 1919 to 2011

Sajal Sthapit
This dataset has common wheat variety acreage data for the three U.S. Pacific Northwest states of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington from 1919 to 2011. The variety acreage data were compiled from the five-yearly Distribution of the Varieties and Classes of Wehat in the United States reports and the data provided by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Services. Acreages of only named varieties have been included, i.e., acreage reported under undefined names such as "others" have...

Data from: Spatial and temporal patterns of environmental DNA detection to inform sampling protocols in lentic and lotic systems

Mallory E. Bedwell & Caren S. Goldberg
The development of efficient sampling protocols for the capture of environmental DNA (eDNA) could greatly help improve accuracy of occupancy monitoring for species that are difficult to detect. However, the process of developing a protocol in situ is complicated for rare species by the fact that animal locations are often unknown. We tested sampling designs in lake and stream systems to determine the most effective eDNA sampling protocols for two rare species: the Sierra Nevada...

Data from: Mother's social status is associated with child health in a horticulturalist population

Sarah Alami, Christopher Von Rueden, Edmond Seabright, Thomas S. Kraft, Aaron D. Blackwell, Jonathan Stieglitz, Hillard Kaplan & Michael Gurven
High social status is often associated with greater mating opportunities and fertility for men, but do women also obtain fitness benefits of high status? Greater resource access and child survivorship may be principal pathways through which social status increases women’s fitness. Here we examine whether peer-rankings of women’s social status (indicated by political influence, project leadership and respect) positively covaries with child nutritional status and health in a community of Amazonian horticulturalists. We find that...

Reductions in the dietary niche of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) from the Holocene to the Anthropocene.

Emma Elliott Smith, M. Tim Tinker, Emily Whistler, Douglas Kennett, René Vellanoweth, Diane Gifford-Gonzalez, Mark Hylkema & Seth Newsome
The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a marine mammal hunted to near extinction during the 1800s. Despite their well-known importance as a keystone species, we know little about historical sea otter ecology. Here, we characterize the ecological niche of ancient southern sea otters (E. lutris nereis) using d13C and d15N analysis of bones recovered from archaeological sites spanning ~7,000 to 350 years before present (N=112 individuals) at five regions along the coast of California. These...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    30

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    30

Affiliations

  • Washington State University
    30
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    3
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    3
  • The Nature Conservancy
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • Wayne State University
    2
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    2
  • United States Geological Survey
    2
  • Arizona State University
    2
  • University of Idaho
    2