321 Works

Data from: Alate production in an aphid in relation to ant tending and alarm pheromone

Karolina Tegelaar & Olof Leimar
1. Winged dispersal is vital for aphids as predation pressure and host plant conditions fluctuate. 2. Ant-tended aphids also need to disperse, but this may represent a cost for the ants, resulting in an evolutionary conflict of interest over aphid dispersal. 3. The combined effects of aphid alarm pheromone, indicating predation risk, and ant attendance on the production of winged aphids were examined in an experiment with Aphis fabae (Homoptera: Aphididae) (Scopoli 1763) aphids and...

Data from: Butterfly-host plant synchrony determines patterns of host use across years and regions

Tenna Toftegaard, Diana Posledovich, Jose A. Navarro-Cano, Christer Wiklund, Karl Gotthard & Johan Ehrlen
Variation in the degree of synchrony among host plants and herbivores can disrupt or intensify species interactions, alter the strength of natural selection on traits associated with phenological timing, and drive novel host plant associations. We used field observations from three regions during four seasons to examine how timing of the butterfly herbivore Anthocharis cardamines relative to six host plant species (Arabis hirsuta, Cardamine pratensis, Arabis glabra, Arabidopsis thaliana, Thlaspi caerulescens, and Capsella bursa-pastoris) influenced...

Data from: Rodents: food or pests in Neolithic Orkney

Andrzej A. Romaniuk, Alexandra N. Shepherd, David V. Clarke, Alison J. Sheridan, Sheena Fraser, László Bartosiewicz & Jeremy S. Herman
Rodents have important effects on contemporary human societies, sometimes providing a source of food but more often as agricultural pests, or as vectors and reservoirs of disease. Skeletal remains of rodents are commonly found in archaeological assemblages from around the world, highlighting their potential importance to ancient human populations. However, there are few studies of the interactions between people and rodents at such sites and most of these are confined to locations where rodents have...

Data from: Ancient DNA from mastics solidifies connection between material culture and genetics of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in Scandinavia

Natalia Kashuba, Emrah Kırdök, Hege Damlien, Mikael A. Manninen, Bengt Nordqvist, Per Persson & Anders Götherström
The discussion of an early postglacial dual-route colonization of the Scandinavian Peninsula is largely based on associating genomic data to an early dispersal of lithic technology from the East European Plain. However, a direct link between the two has been lacking. We tackle this problem by analysing human DNA from birch bark pitch mastics, “chewing gums”, from Huseby Klev, a site in western Sweden with eastern lithic technology. We generate genome-wide data for three individuals,...

Data from: The effect of a transient immune activation on subjective health perception in two placebo controlled randomised experiments

Mats Lekander, John Axelsson, Caroline Olgart Höglund, Anna Andreasson, Martin Ingvar, Lisa Lidberg, Torbjörn Åkerstedt & Bianka Karshikoff
Background Patient-reported outcomes predict mortality and play increasingly important roles in care, but factors that modify central measures such as health ratings have been little investigated. Building on designated immune-to-brain pathways, we aimed to determine how a short-term induced inflammation response impacts self-reported health status. Methods Lipopolysaccharide injections were used to provoke acute systemic inflammatory responses in healthy men and women and were compared to placebo in two double-blind randomized experiments. In Experiment 1, 8...

Data from: Seasonally varying marine influences on the coastal ecosystem detected through molecular gut analysis

Vasiliki Verschut, Alma Strandmark, Rodrigo Esparza-Salas & Peter A. Hamback
Terrestrial predators on marine shores benefit from the inflow of organisms and matter from the marine ecosystem, often causing very high predator densities and indirectly affecting the abundance of other prey species on shores. This indirect effect may be particularly strong if predators shift diets between seasons. We therefore quantified the seasonal variation in diet of two wolf spider species that dominate the shoreline predator community, using molecular gut content analyses with general primers to...

Data from: Moth body size increases with elevation along a complete tropical elevational gradient for two hyperdiverse clades

Gunnar Brehm, Dirk Zeuss & Robert K. Colwell
The body size of an animal is probably its most important functional trait. For arthropods, environmental drivers of body size variation are still poorly documented and understood, especially in tropical regions. We use a unique dataset for two species-rich, phylogenetically independent moth taxa (Lepidoptera: Geometridae; Arctiinae), collected along an extensive tropical elevational gradient in Costa Rica, to investigate the correlates and possible causes of body-size variation. We studied 15,047 specimens (794 species) of Geometridae and...

Data from: Performance of forest bryophytes with different geographical distributions transplanted across a topographically heterogeneous landscape

C. Johan Dahlberg, Johan Ehrlén & Kristoffer Hylander
Most species distribution models assume a close link between climatic conditions and species distributions. Yet, we know little about the link between species' geographical distributions and the sensitivity of performance to local environmental factors. We studied the performance of three bryophyte species transplanted at south- and north-facing slopes in a boreal forest landscape in Sweden. At the same sites, we measured both air and ground temperature. We hypothesized that the two southerly distributed species Eurhynchium...

Data from: Effects of phylogenetic reconstruction method on the robustness of species delimitation using single-locus data

Cuong Q. Tang, Aelys M. Humphreys, Diego Fontaneto & Timothy G. Barraclough
1. Coalescent-based species delimitation methods combine population genetic and phylogenetic theory to provide an objective means for delineating evolutionarily significant units of diversity. The Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent (GMYC) and the Poisson Tree Process (PTP) are methods that use ultrametric (GMYC or PTP) or non-ultrametric (PTP) gene trees as input, intended for use mostly with single-locus data such as DNA barcodes. 2. Here we assess how robust the GMYC and PTP are to different phylogenetic...

Data from: Population demography and heterozygosity-fitness correlations in natural guppy populations: an examination using sexually selected fitness traits

Catherine E. Grueber, John L. Fitzpatrick, Alessandro Devigili, Clelia Gasparini, Indar W. Ramnarine & Jonathan P. Evans
Heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) have been examined in a wide diversity of contexts, and the results are often used to infer the role of inbreeding in natural populations. Although population demography, reflected in population-level genetic parameters such as allelic diversity or identity disequilibrium, is expected to play a role in the emergence and detectability of HFCs, direct comparisons of variation in HFCs across many populations of the same species, with different genetic histories, are rare. Here,...

Data from: Pollination treatment affects fruit set and modifies marketable and storable fruit quality of commercial apples

Ulrika Samnegård, Peter Hambäck & Henrik Smith
Insect-mediated pollination increases yields of many crop species and some evidence suggests that it also influences crop quality. However, the mechanistic linkages between insect-mediated pollination and crop quality are poorly known. In this study, we explored how different pollination treatments affected fruit set, dry matter content (DMC), mineral content and storability of apples. Apple flowers supplementary pollinated with compatible pollen resulted in higher initial fruit set rates, higher fruit DMC and a tendency for lower...

Brain size affects responsiveness in mating behavior to variation in predation pressure and sex-ratio

Alberto Corral Lopez
Despite ongoing advances in sexual selection theory, the evolution of mating decisions remains enigmatic. Cognitive processes often require simultaneous processing of multiple sources of information from environmental and social cues. However, little experimental data exist on how cognitive ability affects such fitness-associated aspects of behavior. Using advanced tracking techniques, we studied mating behaviors of guppies artificially selected for divergence in relative brain size, with known differences in cognitive ability, when predation threat and sex-ratio was...

Data from: Heterospecific mating interactions as an interface between ecology and evolution

Daisuke Kyogoku & David Wheatcroft
Reproductive interference (costly interspecific sexual interactions) are well-understood to promote divergence in mating-relevant traits (i.e. reproductive character displacement: RCD), but it can also reduce population growth, eventually leading to local extinction of one of the species. The ecological and evolutionary processes driven by reproductive interference can interact with each other. These interactions are likely to influence whether the outcome is co-existence or extinction, but remain little studied. In this paper, we first develop an eco-evolutionary...

Maps of northern peatland extent, depth, carbon storage and nitrogen storage

Gustaf Hugelius, Julie Loisel, Sarah Chadburn, Robert B. Jackson, Miriam Jones, Glen MacDonald, Maija Marushchak, David Olefeldt, Maara Packalen, Matthias B. Siewert, Claire Treat, Merritt Turestsky, Carolina Voigt & Zicheng Yu
This dataset is grids of peatland extent, peat depth, peatland organic carbon storage, peatland total nitrogen storage and approximate extent of ombrotrophic/minerotrophic peatlands. The grids are geotiff files in 10 km pixel resolution projected in the World Azimuthal Equidistant projection. Note that the peat depth grid shows potential peat depth everywhere,also where there is no peatland cover. For files on peatland organic carbon, total nitrogen extent and extent of ombrotrophic/minerotrophic peatlands, there are separate files...

Fast life-histories are associated with larger brain size in killifishes

Will Sowersby, Simon Eckerström-Liedholm, Alexander Kotrschal, Joacim Näslund, Piotr Rowiński, Alejandro Gonzalez-Voyer & Björn Rogell
The high energetic demands associated with the vertebrate brain are proposed to result in a trade-off between the pace of life-history and relative brain size. However, because both life-history and brain size also have a strong relationship with body size, any associations between the pace of life-history and relative brain size may be confounded by coevolution with body size. Studies on systems where contrasts in the pace of life-history occur without concordant contrasts in body...

Short-term exposure to heatwave-like temperatures affects learning and memory in bumblebees

Maxence Gérard
Global warming has been identified as a key driver of bee declines around the world. While it is clear that elevated temperatures during the spring and summer months – the principal activity period of many bee species – is a factor in this decline, exactly how temperature affects bee survival is unknown. In vertebrates, there is clear evidence that elevated ambient temperatures impair cognition but whether and how heat affects the cognitive abilities of invertebrates...

Exposure to elevated temperature during development affects bumblebee foraging behavior

Maxence Gérard, Bérénice Cariou, Maxime Henrion, Charlotte Descamps & Emily Baird
Bee foraging behavior provides a pollination service that has both ecological and economic benefits. However, bee population decline could directly affect the efficiency of this interaction. Among the drivers of this decline, global warming has been implicated as an emerging threat but exactly how increasing temperatures affect bee foraging behavior remains unexplored. Here, we assessed how exposure to elevated temperatures during development affects the foraging behavior and morphology of workers from commercial and wild Bombus...

Data from: High spatiotemporal variability of methane concentrations challenges estimates of emissions across vegetated coastal ecosystems

Florian Roth, Xiaol Sun, Marc Geibel, John Prytcherch, Volker Brüchert, Stefano Bonaglia, Elias Broman, Francisco Nascimento, Christoph Humborg & Alf Norkko
Coastal methane (CH4) emissions dominate the global ocean CH4 budget and can offset the “blue carbon” storage capacity of vegetated coastal ecosystems. However, current estimates lack systematic, high-resolution, and long-term data from these intrinsically heterogeneous environments, making coastal budgets sensitive to statistical assumptions and uncertainties. Using continuous CH4 concentrations, δ13C-CH4 values, and CH4 sea-air fluxes across four seasons in three globally pervasive coastal habitats, we show that the CH4 distribution is spatially patchy over meter-scales...

Next-generation phylogeography resolves post-glacial colonization patterns in a widespread carnivore, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), in Europe

Allan McDevitt, Ilaria Coscia, Samuel S Browett, Aritz Ruiz-Gonzalez, Mark Statham, Inka Ruczynska, Liam Roberts, Joanna Stojak, Alain Frantz, Karin Norén, Erik Agren, Jane Learmount, Mafalda Basto, Carlos Fernandes, Peter Stuart, David G Tosh, Magda Sindicic, Tibor Andreanszky, Marja Isomursu, Marek Panek, Andrey Korolev, Innokentiy M Okhlopkov, Alexander P Saveljev, Bostjan Pokorny, Katarina Flajsman … & Jan Wójcik
Carnivores tend to exhibit a lack of (or less pronounced) genetic structure at continental scales in both a geographic and temporal sense using various mitochondrial DNA markers on modern and/or ancient specimens. This tends to confound the identification of refugial areas and post-glacial colonization patterns in this group. In this study we used Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) to reconstruct the phylogeographic history of a widespread carnivore, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), in Europe by investigating broad-scale patterns...

Data from: Body odour disgust sensitivity predicts authoritarian attitudes

Marco Tullio Liuzza, Torun Lindholm, Caitlin B. Hawley, Marie Gustafsson-Sendén, Ingrid Ekström & Jonas K. Olofsson
Authoritarianism has resurfaced as a research topic in political psychology, as it appears relevant to explain current political trends. Authoritarian attitudes have been consistently linked to feelings of disgust, an emotion that is thought to have evolved to protect the organism from contamination. We hypothesized that body odour disgust sensitivity (BODS) might be associated with authoritarianism, as chemo-signalling is a primitive system for regulating interpersonal contact and disease avoidance, which are key features also in...

Data from: Estimation of effective population size in continuously distributed populations: there goes the neighborhood

Maile C. Neel, Kevin McKelvey, Robin S. Waples, Nils Ryman, Michael W. Lloyd, Ruth Short Bull, Fred W. Allendorf & Michael K. Schwartz
Use of genetic methods to estimate effective population size (N^e) is rapidly increasing, but all approaches make simplifying assumptions unlikely to be met in real populations. In particular, all assume a single, unstructured population, and none has been evaluated for use with continuously distributed species. We simulated continuous populations with local mating structure, as envisioned by Wright's concept of neighborhood size (NS), and evaluated performance of a single-sample estimator based on linkage disequilibrium (LD), which...

Data from: Intergenomic interactions between mitochondrial and Y-linked genes shape male mating patterns and fertility in Drosophila melanogaster

Winston K. W. Yee, Björn Rogell, Bernardo Lemos, Damian K. Dowling & Winston K.W. Yee
Under maternal inheritance, mitochondrial genomes are prone to accumulate mutations that exhibit male-biased effects. Such mutations should, however, place selection on the nuclear genome for modifier adaptations that mitigate mitochondrial-incurred male harm. One gene region that might harbor such modifiers is the Y-chromosome, given the abundance of Y-linked variation for male fertility, and because Y-linked modifiers would not exert antagonistic effects in females because they would be found only in males. Recent studies in Drosophila...

Data from: The importance of trees for woody pasture bird diversity and effects of the European Union's tree density policy

Simon Jakobsson & Regina Lindborg
1. Recent reforms in the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) aim for a greening of the subsidy system with potential improvements for biodiversity conservation. As part of that process, the tree density limit for pastures to qualify for European Union (EU) subsidies has been increased from 50 to 100 trees/ha. However, recent studies show that the high biodiversity values of these habitats may be threatened by these limits, highlighting the need for policy improvements. Still, little...

Thermal performance under constant temperatures can accurately predict insect development times across naturally variable microclimates

Loke Von Schmalensee, Katrín Hulda Gunnarsdóttir, Joacim Näslund, Karl Gotthard & Philipp Lehmann
External conditions can drive biological rates in ectotherms by directly influencing body temperatures. While estimating the temperature dependence of performance-traits such as growth and development rate is feasible under controlled laboratory settings, predictions in nature are difficult. One major challenge lies in translating performance under constant conditions to fluctuating environments. Using the butterfly Pieris napi as model system, we show that development rate, an important fitness trait, can be accurately predicted in the field using...

Data from: Rapid post-fire re-assembly of species-rich bryophyte communities in Afroalpine heathlands

Kristoffer Hylander, Carl Alexander Frisk, Sileshi Nemomissa & Maria Ulrika Johansson
Questions: In some fire-prone ecosystems, bryophytes play a crucial role by providing the surface fuel that controls the fire-return interval. Afroalpine heathlands are such an ecosystem, yet almost nothing is known about the bryophytes in this system. We do not know the level of species richness, or if there is a successive accumulation of species over time, or if some species are adapted to specific phases along the successional gradient, for example early-successional species sensitive...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    22
  • 2021
    45
  • 2020
    48
  • 2019
    24
  • 2018
    42
  • 2017
    37
  • 2016
    32
  • 2015
    34
  • 2014
    16
  • 2013
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    321

Affiliations

  • Stockholm University
    321
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    39
  • Uppsala University
    23
  • University of Helsinki
    15
  • Lund University
    12
  • Linköping University
    12
  • University of Tartu
    7
  • Karolinska Institute
    7
  • Swedish Museum of Natural History
    7
  • Ghent University
    6