32 Works

Trophic complexity in aqueous systems: bacterial species richness and protistan predation regulate dissolved organic carbon and dissolved total nitrogen removal

Muhammad Saleem, Ingo Fetzer, Hauke Harms & Antonis Chatzinotas
Loading of water bodies with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved total nitrogen (DTN) affects their integrity and functioning. Microbial interactions mitigate the negative effects of high nutrient loads in these ecosystems. Despite numerous studies on how biodiversity mediates ecosystem functions, whether and how diversity and complexity of microbial food webs (horizontal, vertical) and the underlying ecological mechanisms influence nutrient removal has barely been investigated. Using microbial microcosms accommodating systematic combinations of prey (bacteria) and...

Data from: Olfactory and visual plant cues as drivers of selective herbivory

Rebecca S. Stutz, Benjamin M. Croak, Nicholas Proschogo, Peter B. Banks & Clare McArthur
Food quality is an important consideration in the foraging strategy of all animals, including herbivores. Those that can detect and assess the nutritional value of plants from afar, using senses such as smell and sight, can forage more efficiently than those that must assess food quality by taste alone. Selective foraging not only affects herbivore fitness but can influence the structure and composition of plant communities, yet little is known about how olfactory and visual...

Data from: Guppies occupy consistent positions in social networks: mechanisms and consequences

Stefan Krause, Alexander D.M. Wilson, Indar W. Ramnarine, James E. Herbert-Read, Romain J.G. Clément & Jens Krause
The social network approach has focused increasing attention on the complex web of relationships found in animal groups and populations. As such, network analysis has been used frequently to identify the role that particular individuals play in their social interactions and this approach has led to the question of whether, and in what context, individuals consistently occupy certain positions within their network. Here we investigated the social networks of guppies, Poecilia reticulata, in the wild...

Data from: A heterogeneous landscape does not guarantee high crop pollination

Ulrika Samnegård, Peter A. Hambäck, Debissa Lemessa, Sileshi Nemomissa & Kristoffer Hylander
The expansion of pollinator-dependent crops, especially in the developing world, together with reports of worldwide pollinator declines, raises concern of possible yield gaps. Farmers directly reliant on pollination services for food supply often live in regions where our knowledge of pollination services is poor. In a manipulative experiment replicated at 23 sites across an Ethiopian agricultural landscape, we found poor pollination services and severe pollen limitation in a common oil crop. With supplementary pollination, the...

Data from: Comparison of capture and storage methods for aqueous macrobial eDNA using an optimized extraction protocol: advantage of enclosed filter

Johan Spens, Alice R. Evans, David Halfmaerten, Steen W. Knudsen, Mita E. Sengupta, Sarah S. T. Mak, Eva E. Sigsgaard & Micaela Hellström
Aqueous environmental DNA (eDNA) is an emerging efficient non-invasive tool for species inventory studies. To maximize performance of downstream quantitative PCR (qPCR) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) applications, quality and quantity of the starting material is crucial, calling for optimized capture, storage and extraction techniques of eDNA. Previous comparative studies for eDNA capture/storage have tested precipitation and ‘open’ filters. However, practical ‘enclosed’ filters which reduce unnecessary handling have not been included. Here, we fill this gap...

Data from: Rodents: food or pests in Neolithic Orkney

Andrzej A. Romaniuk, Alexandra N. Shepherd, David V. Clarke, Alison J. Sheridan, Sheena Fraser, László Bartosiewicz & Jeremy S. Herman
Rodents have important effects on contemporary human societies, sometimes providing a source of food but more often as agricultural pests, or as vectors and reservoirs of disease. Skeletal remains of rodents are commonly found in archaeological assemblages from around the world, highlighting their potential importance to ancient human populations. However, there are few studies of the interactions between people and rodents at such sites and most of these are confined to locations where rodents have...

Data from: The changing contribution of top-down and bottom-up limitation of mesopredators during 220 years of land use and climate change

Marianne Pasanen-Mortensen, Bodil Elmhagen, Harto Linden, Roger Bergström, Märtha Wallgren, Ype Van Der Velde, Sara A. O. Cousins & Sara A.O. Cousins
Apex predators may buffer bottom-up driven ecosystem change, as top-down suppression may dampen herbivore and mesopredator responses to increased resource availability. However, theory suggests that for this buffering capacity to be realized, the equilibrium abundance of apex predators must increase. This raises the question: will apex predators maintain herbivore/mesopredator limitation, if bottom-up change relaxes resource constraints? Here, we explore changes in mesopredator (red fox Vulpes vulpes) abundance over 220 years in response to eradication and...

Data from: Brain size evolution in pipefishes and seahorses: the role of feeding ecology, life history and sexual selection

Masahito Tsuboi, Adam Chee Ooi Lim, Boon Leong Ooi, Mei Yee Yip, Ving Ching Chong, Ingrid Ahnesjö & Niclas Kolm
Brain size varies greatly at all taxonomic levels. Feeding ecology, life history and sexual selection have been proposed as key components in generating contemporary diversity in brain size across vertebrates. Analyses of brain size evolution have, however, been limited to lineages where males predominantly compete for mating and females choose mates. Here, we present the first original data set of brain sizes in pipefishes and seahorses (Syngnathidae) a group in which intense female mating competition...

Data from: Anthropogenic ecosystem disturbance and the recovery debt

David Moreno Mateos, Edward B. Barbier, Peter C. Jones, Holly P. Jones, James Aronson, Jose A. Lopez-Lopez, Michelle L. McCrackin, Paula Meli, Daniel Montoya & José Rey Benayas
Ecosystem recovery from anthropogenic disturbances, either without human intervention or assisted by ecological restoration, is increasingly occurring worldwide. As ecosystems progress through recovery, it is important to estimate any resulting deficit in biodiversity and functions. Here we use data from 3,035 sampling plots worldwide, to quantify the interim reduction of biodiversity and functions occurring during the recovery process (that is, the ‘recovery debt’). Compared with reference levels, recovering ecosystems run annual deficits of 46–51% for...

Data from: The genetic basis for ecological adaptation of the Atlantic herring revealed by genome sequencing

Alvaro Martinez Barrio, Sangeet Lamichhaney, Guangyi Fan, Nima Rafati, Mats Pettersson, He Zhang, Jacques Dainat, Diana Ekman, Marc Höppner, Patric Jern, Marcel Martin, Björn Nystedt, Xin Liu, Wenbin Chen, Xinming Liang, Chengcheng Shi, Yuanyuan Fu, Kailong Ma, Xiao Zhan, Chungang Feng, Ulla Gustafson, Carl-Johan Rubin, Markus Sällman Almén, Martina Blass, Michele Casini … & Leif Andersson
Ecological adaptation is of major relevance to speciation and sustainable population management, but the underlying genetic factors are typically hard to study in natural populations due to genetic differentiation caused by natural selection being confounded with genetic drift in subdivided populations. Here, we use whole genome population sequencing of Atlantic and Baltic herring to reveal the underlying genetic architecture at an unprecedented detailed resolution for both adaptation to a new niche environment and timing of...

Data from: A Bayesian approach for detecting the impact of mass-extinction events on molecular phylogenies when rates of lineage diversification may vary

Michael R. May, Sebastian Hoehna & Brian R. Moore
The paleontological record chronicles numerous episodes of mass extinction that severely culled the Tree of Life. Biologists have long sought to assess the extent to which these events may have impacted particular groups. We present a novel method for detecting the impact of mass-extinction events on molecular phylogenies, even in the presence of tree-wide diversification-rate variation and in the absence of additional information from the fossil record. Our approach is based on an episodic stochastic-branching...

Data from: Energy and lipid metabolism during direct and diapause development in a pierid butterfly

Philipp Lehmann, Peter Pruisscher, Diana Posledovich, Mikael Carlsson, Reijo Käkelä, Patrik Tang, Sören Nylin, Christopher W. Wheat, Christer Wiklund & Karl Gotthard
Diapause is a fundamental component of the life-cycle in the majority of insects living in environments characterized by strong seasonality. The present study addresses poorly understood associations and trade-offs between endogenous diapause duration, thermal sensitivity of development, energetic cost of development and cold tolerance. Diapause intensity, metabolic rate trajectories and lipid profiles of directly developing and diapausing animals were studied using pupae and adults of Pieris napi butterflies from a population for which endogenous diapause...

Data from: Inbreeding depression in a critically endangered carnivore

Karin Norén, Erika Godoy, Love Dalén, Tomas Meijer & Anders Angerbjörn
Harmful effects arising from matings between relatives (inbreeding) is a long-standing observation that is well founded in theory. Empirical evidence for inbreeding depression in natural populations is however rare because of the challenges of assembling pedigrees supplemented with fitness traits. We examined the occurrence of inbreeding and subsequent inbreeding depression using a unique data set containing a genetically verified pedigree with individual fitness traits for a critically endangered arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) population. The study...

Data from: Divergence within and among seaweed siblings (Fucus vesiculosus and F. radicans) in the Baltic Sea

Angelica Ardehed, Daniel Johansson, Lisa Sundqvist, Ellen Schagerström, Zuzanna Zagrodzka, Nikolaj A. Kovaltchouk, Lena Bergström, Lena Kautsky, Marina Rafajlovic, Ricardo T. Pereyra & Kerstin Johannesson
Closely related taxa provide significant case studies for understanding evolution of new species but may simultaneously challenge species identification and definition. In the Baltic Sea, two dominant and perennial brown algae share a very recent ancestry. Fucus vesiculosus invaded this recently formed postglacial sea 8000 years ago and shortly thereafter Fucus radicans diverged from this lineage as an endemic species. In the Baltic Sea both species reproduce sexually but also recruit fully fertile new individuals...

Data from: The spatial dynamics of predators and the benefits and costs of sharing information

Matthieu Barbier & James R. Watson
Predators of all kinds, be they lions hunting in the Serengeti or fishermen searching for their catch, display various collective strategies. A common strategy is to share information about the location of prey. However, depending on the spatial characteristics and mobility of predators and prey, information sharing can either improve or hinder individual success. Here, our goal is to investigate the interacting effects of space and information sharing on predation efficiency, represented by the expected...

Data from: Colony pace: a life-history trait affecting social insect epidemiology

Severine Denise Buechel & Paul Schmidt-Hempel
Among colonies of social insects, the worker turnover rate (colony ‘pace’) typically shows considerable variation. This has epidemiological consequences for parasites, because in ‘fast-paced’ colonies, with short-lived workers, the time of parasite residence in a given host will be reduced, and further transmission may thus get less likely. Here, we test this idea and ask whether pace is a life-history strategy against infectious parasites. We infected bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) with the infectious gut parasite Crithidia...

Data from: Fine-grain, large-domain climate models based on climate station and comprehensive topographic information improve microrefugia detection

Eric Meineri & Kristoffer Hylander
Large-domain species distribution models (SDMs) fail to identify microrefugia, as they are based on climate estimates that are either too coarse or that ignore relevant topographic climate-forcing factors. Climate station data are considered inadequate to produce such estimates, a viewpoint we challenge here. Using climate stations and topographic data, we developed three sets of large-domain (450,000 km²), fine-grain (50 m) temperature grids accounting for different levels of topographic complexity. Using these fine-grain grids and the...

Data from: Detecting evolutionarily significant units above the species level using the Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent method

Aelys M. Humphreys, Catarina Rydin, Knud A. Jønsson, David Alsop, Leah M. Callender-Crowe & Timothy G. Barraclough
1. There is renewed interest in inferring evolutionary history by modelling diversification rates using phylogenies. Understanding the performance of the methods used under different scenarios is essential for assessing empirical results. Recently we introduced a new approach for analysing broadscale diversity patterns, using the Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent (GMYC) method to test for the existence of evolutionarily significant units above the species (higher ESUs). This approach focuses on identifying clades as well as estimating rates...

Data from: Multi-trait aposematic signal in Batesian mimicry

David Outomuro, Pedro Ángel-Giraldo, Alberto Corral-Lopez & Emilio Realpe
Batesian mimics can parasitize Müllerian mimicry rings mimicking the warning color signal. The evolutionary success of Batesian mimics can increase adding complexity to the signal by behavioral and locomotor mimicry. We investigated three fundamental morphological and locomotor traits in a Neotropical mimicry ring based on Ithomiini butterflies and parasitized by Polythoridae damselflies: wing color, wing shape, and flight style. The study species have wings with a subapical white patch, considered the aposematic signal, and a...

Data from: Geographic variation and trade-offs in parasitoid virulence

Lisa Fors, Robert Markus, Ulrich Theopold, Lars Ericson & Peter A. Hambäck
Host–parasitoid systems are characterized by a continuous development of new defence strategies in hosts and counter-defence mechanisms in parasitoids. This co-evolutionary arms race makes host–parasitoid systems excellent for understanding trade-offs in host use caused by evolutionary changes in host immune responses and parasitoid virulence. However, knowledge obtained from natural host–parasitoid systems on such trade-offs is still limited. In this study, the aim was to examine trade-offs in parasitoid virulence in Asecodes parviclava (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) when...

Data from: Regime shifts in marine communities: a complex systems perspective on food web dynamics

Johanna Yletyinen, Örjan Bodin, Marie Nordström, Benjamin Weigel, Erik Bonsdorff & Thorsten Blenckner
Species composition and habitats are changing at unprecedented rates in the world’s oceans, potentially causing entire food webs to shift to structurally and functionally different regimes. Despite the severity of these regime shifts, elucidating the precise nature of their underlying processes has remained difficult. We address this challenge with a new analytic approach to detect and assess the relative strength of different driving processes in food webs. Our study draws on complexity theory, and integrates...

Data from: Reliability and construct validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised in a Swedish non-criminal sample: a multimethod approach including psychophysiological correlates of empathy for pain

Karolina Sörman, Gustav Nilsonne, Katarina Howner, Sandra Tamm, Shilan Caman, Hui-Xin Wang, Martin Ingvar, John F. Edens, Petter Gustavsson, Scott O. Lilienfeld, Predrag Petrovic, Håkan Fischer & Marianne Kristiansson
Cross-cultural investigation of psychopathy measures is important for clarifying the nomological network surrounding the psychopathy construct. The Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R) is one of the most extensively researched self-report measures of psychopathic traits in adults. To date however, it has been examined primarily in North American criminal or student samples. To address this gap in the literature, we examined PPI-R’s reliability, construct validity and factor structure in non-criminal individuals (N = 227) in Sweden, using...

Data from: Bioinformatic processing of RAD-seq data dramatically impacts downstream population genetic inference

Aaron B. A. Shafer, Claire R. Peart, Sergio Tusso, Inbar Maayan, Alan Brelsford, Christopher W. Wheat & Jochen B. W. Wolf
Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) provides high-resolution population genomic data at low cost, and has become an important component in ecological and evolutionary studies. As with all high-throughput technologies, analytic strategies require critical validation to ensure accurate and unbiased interpretation. To test for the impact of bioinformatic data processing on downstream population genetic inferences, we analysed mammalian RAD-seq data (>100 individuals) with 312 combinations of methodology (de novo vs. mapping to references of increasing divergence)...

Data from: Advances in finding Alba: the locus affecting life history and color polymorphism in a Colias butterfly

Alyssa Woronik & Christopher W. Wheat
Although alternative life history strategies exist within many populations, very little is known about their genetic basis and mechanistic insight to these traits could greatly advance the understanding of eco-evolutionary dynamics. Many species of butterfly within the genus Colias exhibit a sex-limited wing color polymorphism, called Alba, which is correlated with an alternative life history strategy. Here we have taken the first steps in localizing the region carrying Alba in Colias croceus, a species with...

Data from: Disentangling associational effects: both resource density and resource frequency affect search behaviour in complex environments

Thomas A. Verschut, Paul G. Becher, Peter Anderson & Peter A. Hambäck
Neighbouring resources have been found to either decrease or increase the likelihood that a consumer organism attacks a focal resource. These phenomena are referred to as associational resistance (AR) and associational susceptibility (AS), respectively. While associational effects have been observed in various field studies, little is known on how resource heterogeneity can cause associational effects. We used a laboratory approach in which we studied the effects of resource density and frequency in the search behaviour...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    32

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    32

Affiliations

  • Stockholm University
    32
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    4
  • Uppsala University
    4
  • Texas A&M University
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • University of the West Indies
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1
  • Basque Centre for Climate Change
    1