17 Works

Data from: Cryptic diversity in black rats Rattus rattus of the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador

Sandi Willows-Munro, Robert C. Dowler, Michael R. Jarcho, Reese B. Phillips, Howard L. Snell, Tammy R. Wilbert & Cody W. Edwards
Human activity has facilitated the introduction of a number of alien mammal species to the Galápagos Archipelago. Understanding the phylogeographic history and population genetics of invasive species on the Archipelago is an important step in predicting future spread and designing effective management strategies. In this study, we describe the invasion pathway of Rattus rattus across the Galápagos using microsatellite data, coupled with historical knowledge. Microsatellite genotypes were generated for 581 R. rattus sampled from 15...

Data from: Isotopic niches support the resource breadth hypothesis

Jonathan A. Rader, Seth D. Newsome, Pablo Sabat, R. Terry Chesser, Michael E. Dillon & Carlos Martínez Del Rio
Because a broad spectrum of resource use allows species to persist in a wide range of habitat types, and thus permits them to occupy large geographical areas, and because broadly distributed species have access to more diverse resource bases, the resource breadth hypothesis posits that the diversity of resources used by organisms should be positively related with the extent of their geographic ranges. We investigated isotopic niche width in a small radiation of South American...

Data from: Does gene tree discordance explain the mismatch between macroevolutionary models and empirical patterns of tree shape and branching times?

Tanja Stadler, James H. Degnan & Noah A. Rosenberg
Classic null models for speciation and extinction give rise to phylogenies that differ in distribution from empirical phylogenies. In particular, empirical phylogenies are less balanced and have branching times closer to the root compared to phylogenies predicted by common null models. This difference might be due to null models of the speciation and extinction process being too simplistic, or due to the empirical datasets not being representative of random phylogenies. A third possibility arises because...

Data from: Fire frequency drives habitat selection by a diverse herbivore guild impacting top–down control of plant communities in an African savanna

Deron E. Burkepile, Dave I. Thompson, Richard W. S. Fynn, Sally E. Koerner, Stephanie Eby, Navashni Govender, Nicole Hagenah, Nathan P. Lemoine, Katherine J. Matchett, Kevin R. Wilcox, Scott L. Collins, Kevin P. Kirkman, Alan K. Knapp & Melinda D. Smith
In areas with diverse herbivore communities such as African savannas, the frequency of disturbance by fire may alter the top–down role of different herbivore species on plant community dynamics. In a seven year experiment in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, we examined the habitat use of nine common herbivore species across annually burned, triennially burned and unburned areas. We also used two types of exclosures (plus open access controls) to examine the impacts of...

Data from: Changes in spatial variance during a grassland to shrubland state transition

Zak Ratajczak, Paolo D'Odorico, Jesse B. Nippert, Scott L. Collins, Nathaniel A. Brunsell & Sujith Ravi
State transitions are changes in ecosystem structure and self-reinforcing feedbacks that are initiated when an exogenous driver variable crosses a threshold. Reversing state transitions is difficult and costly. While some state transitions are relatively rapid, many take years to decades. Outside of theoretical models, very little is known about slower state transitions and how they unfold in time and space. We quantified changes in spatial variance as a mesic grassland ecosystem shifts to a shrub-dominated...

Data from: Spatio-temporal variation in parasite communities maintains diversity at the major histocompatibility complex class IIβ in the endangered Rio Grande Silvery Minnow

Megan J. Osborne, Tyler J. Pilger, Joel D. Lusk & Thomas F. Turner
Climate change will strongly impact aquatic ecosystems particularly in arid and semi-arid regions. Fish-parasite interactions will also be affected by predicted altered flow and temperature regimes, and other environmental stressors. Hence, identifying environmental and genetic factors associated with maintaining diversity at immune genes is critical for understanding species’ adaptive capacity. Here we combine genetic (MHC Class IIβ and microsatellites), parasitological and ecological data to explore the relationship between these factors in the remnant wild Rio...

Data from: Phylogenomics from whole genome sequences using aTRAM

Julie M. Allen, Bret Boyd, Nam-Phuong Nguyen, Pranjal Vachaspati, Tandy Warnow, Daisie I. Huang, Patrick G. S. Grady, Kayce C. Bell, Quentin C.B. Cronk, Lawrence Mugisha, Barry R. Pittendrigh, M. Soledad Leonardi, David L. Reed & Kevin P. Johnson
Novel sequencing technologies are rapidly expanding the size of data sets that can be applied to phylogenetic studies. Currently the most commonly used phylogenomic approaches involve some form of genome reduction. While these approaches make assembling phylogenomic data sets more economical for organisms with large genomes, they reduce the genomic coverage and thereby the long-term utility of the data. Currently, for organisms with moderate to small genomes (<1000 Mbp) it is feasible to sequence the...

Data from: Characteristics and outcomes of women utilizing emergency medical services for third-trimester pregnancy-related complaints in India: a prospective observational study

Matthew C. Strehlow, Jennifer A. Newberry, Corey B. Bills, Hyeyoun Min, Ann E. Evensen, Lawrence Leeman, Elizabeth A. Pirrotta, G. V. Ramana Rao & S. V. Mahadevan
Objectives: Characterize the demographics, management, and outcomes of obstetric patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS). Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Five Indian states utilizing a centralized EMS agency that transported 3.1 million pregnant women in 2014. Participants: This study enrolled a convenience sample of 1684 women in third trimester of pregnancy calling with a “pregnancy-related” complaint for free-of-charge ambulance transport. Calls were deemed “pregnancy-related” if categorized by EMS dispatchers as “pregnancy”, “childbirth”, “miscarriage”, or...

Data from: Plant–soil feedbacks promote negative frequency dependence in the coexistence of two aridland grasses

Y. Ann Chung, Jennifer A. Rudgers & Y. Anny Chung
Understanding the mechanisms of species coexistence is key to predicting patterns of species diversity. Historically, the ecological paradigm has been that species coexist by partitioning resources: as a species increases in abundance, self-limitation kicks in, because species-specific resources decline. However, determining coexistence mechanisms has been a particular puzzle for sedentary organisms with high overlap in their resource requirements, such as plants. Recent evidence suggests that plant-associated microbes could generate the stabilizing self-limitation (negative frequency dependence)...

Data from: Seasonal patterns in δ2H values of multiple tissues from Andean birds provide insights into elevational migration

Mariana Villegas, Seth D. Newsome & John G. Blake
Elevational migration is a widespread phenomenon in tropical avifauna but it is difficult to identify using traditional approaches. Hydrogen isotope (δ2H) values of precipitation decrease with elevation so δ2H analysis of multiple bird tissues with different isotopic incorporation rates may be a reliable method for characterizing seasonal elevational migration. Here we compare δ2H values in metabolically inert (feathers and claws) and metabolically active (whole blood) tissues to examine whether an upslope migration occurs prior to...

Data from: Herbivore size matters for productivity-richness relationships in African savannas

Deron E. Burkepile, Richard W. S. Fynn, Dave I. Thompson, Nathan P. Lemoine, Sally E. Koerner, Stephanie Eby, Nicole Hagenah, Kevin R. Wilcox, Scott L. Collins, Kevin P. Kirkman, Alan K. Knapp & Melinda D. Smith
1.Productivity and herbivory often interact to shape plant community composition and species richness with levels of production mediating the impact of herbivory. Yet, differences in herbivore traits such as size, feeding guild, and dietary requirements may result in different impacts of diverse herbivore guilds across productivity gradients. 2.We used size-selective herbivore exclosures to separate the effects of herbivory by larger herbivores, such as elephant, Burchell's zebra, and blue wildebeest from those of medium/smaller herbivores, such...

Data from: Tectonic collision and uplift of Wallacea triggered the global songbird radiation

Robert G. Moyle, Carl H. Oliveros, Michael J. Andersen, Peter A. Hosner, Brett W. Benz, Joseph D. Manthey, Scott L. Travers, Rafe M. Brown & Brant C. Faircloth
Songbirds (oscine passerines) are the most species rich and cosmopolitan bird group, comprising almost half of global avian species diversity. Because of their diversity and ubiquity, songbirds are used extensively in studies of evolutionary ecology, diversification, and ethology. Songbirds originated in Australia, but the evolutionary trajectory from a single species in an isolated continent to worldwide proliferation is poorly understood. Prior research suggested songbird diversification scenarios that are largely uncoupled from Earth history, including extensive...

Data from: Displayed trees do not determine distinguishability under the network multispecies coalescent

Sha Zhu & James H. Degnan
Recent work in estimating species relationships from gene trees has included inferring networks assuming that past hybridization has occurred between species. Probabilistic models using the multispecies coalescent can be used in this framework for likelihood-based inference of both network topologies and parameters, including branch lengths and hybridization parameters. A difficulty for such methods is that it is not always clear whether, or to what extent, networks are identifiable-that is whether there could be two distinct...

Data from: Plant-fungal symbiosis affects litter decomposition during primary succession

Lukas Bell-Dereske, Xiaodong Gao, Caroline A. Masiello, Robert L. Sinsabaugh, Sarah M. Emery & Jennifer A. Rudgers
Microbial symbionts of plants can affect decomposition by altering the quality or quantity of host plant tissue (substrate) or the micro-environment where decomposition occurs (conditioning). In C3 grasses, foliar fungal endophytes (Clavicipitaceae) can increase plant resistance to drought and/or produce alkaloids that reduce herbivory – effects that may also influence host litter composition and subsequent litter decomposition. We studied the effect of the endophyte Epichloë sp. on litter decomposition in the Great Lakes dunes (USA)...

Data from: Target gene enrichment in the cyclophyllidean cestodes, the most diverse group of tapeworms

Hao Yuan, Jiamei Jiang, F. Agustín Jiménez, Eric P. Hoberg, Joseph A. Cook, Kurt E. Galbreath & Chenhong Li
The Cyclophyllidea is the most diverse order of tapeworms, encompassing species that infect all classes of terrestrial tetrapods including humans and domesticated animals. Available phylogenetic reconstructions based either on morphology or molecular data lack the resolution to allow scientists to either propose a solid taxonomy or infer evolutionary associations. Molecular markers available for the Cyclophyllidea mostly include ribosomal DNA and mitochondrial loci. In this study, we identified 3,641 single-copy nuclear coding loci by comparing the...

Data from: Conditional vulnerability of plant diversity to atmospheric nitrogen deposition across the United States

Samuel M. Simkin, Edith B. Allen, William D. Bowman, Christopher M. Clark, Jayne Belnap, Matthew L. Brooks, Brian S. Cade, Scott L. Collins, Linda H. Geiser, Frank S. Gilliam, Sarah E. Jovan, Linda H. Pardo, Bethany K. Schulz, Carly J. Stevens, Katharine N. Suding, Heather L. Throop & Donald M. Waller
Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has been shown to decrease plant species richness along regional deposition gradients in Europe and in experimental manipulations. However, the general response of species richness to N deposition across different vegetation types, soil conditions, and climates remains largely unknown even though responses may be contingent on these environmental factors. We assessed the effect of N deposition on herbaceous richness for 15,136 forest, woodland, shrubland, and grassland sites across the continental United...

Data from: Germination patterns in three terrestrial orchids relate to abundance of mycorrhizal fungi

Melissa K. McCormick, Donald Lee Taylor, Dennis F. Whigham & Robert K. Burnett
1. The spatial distribution of plants, which is often generated by patterns of seed recruitment, is an important determinant of population dynamics, especially for orchids with seeds that must be exposed to appropriate mycorrhizal fungi. 2. We compared the distribution and abundance of target mycorrhizal fungi detected in the soil using DNA-based molecular techniques and germination in seed packets of Goodyera pubescens, Liparis liliifolia, and Tipularia discolor. 3. We further examined Tulasnella spp. associated with...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • University of New Mexico
    17
  • University of KwaZulu-Natal
    3
  • University of Kansas
    2
  • Stanford University
    2
  • University of Botswana
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • Colorado State University
    2
  • University of the Witwatersrand
    2
  • United States Fish and Wildlife Service
    2
  • Rice University
    1