12 Works

Data from: The phylogeny and biogeography of Hakea (Proteaceae) reveals the role of biome shifts in a continental plant radiation

Marcel Cardillo, Peter H. Weston, Zoe K.M. Reynolds, Peter M. Olde, Austin R. Mast, Emily Lemmon, Alan Richard Lemmon, Lindell Bromham, Emily M. Lemmon & Zoe K. M. Reynolds
The frequency of evolutionary biome shifts during diversification has important implications for our ability to explain geographic patterns of plant diversity. Recent studies present several examples of biome shifts, but whether frequencies of biome shifts closely reflect geographic proximity or environmental similarity of biomes remains poorly known. We explore this question by using phylogenomic methods to estimate the phylogeny of Hakea, a diverse Australian genus occupying a wide range of biomes. Model-based estimation of ancestral...

Data from: Origins of the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus): impacts of ice-olation and introgression

Ryan P. Walter, Denis Roy, Nigel E. Hussey, Björn Stelbrink, Kit M. Kovacs, Christian Lydersen, Bailey C. McMeans, Jörundur Svavarsson, Steven T. Kessel, Sebastian Biton Porsmoguer, Sharon Wildes, Cindy A. Tribuzio, Steven E. Campana, Stephen D. Petersen, R. Dean Grubbs, Daniel D. Heath, Kevin J. Hedges & Aaron T. Fisk
Herein, we use genetic data from 277 sleeper sharks to perform coalescent-based modeling to test the hypothesis of early Quaternary emergence of the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) from ancestral sleeper sharks in the Canadian Arctic-Subarctic region. Our results show that morphologically cryptic somniosids S. microcephalus and Somniosus pacificus can be genetically distinguished using combined mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers. Our data confirm the presence of genetically admixed individuals in the Canadian Arctic and sub-Arctic, and...

Data from: A morphometric analysis of vegetation patterns in dryland ecosystems

Luke Mander, Stefan C. Dekker, Mao Li, Washington Mio, Surangi W. Punyasena & Timothy M. Lenton
Vegetation in dryland ecosystems often forms remarkable spatial patterns. These range from regular bands of vegetation alternating with bare ground, to vegetated spots and labyrinths, to regular gaps of bare ground within an otherwise continuous expanse of vegetation. It has been suggested that spotted vegetation patterns could indicate that collapse into a bare ground state is imminent, and the morphology of spatial vegetation patterns, therefore, represents a potentially valuable source of information on the proximity...

Data from: Mutation predicts 40 million years of fly wing evolution

David Houle, Geir H. Bolstad, Kim Van Der Linde & Thomas F. Hansen
Mutation enables evolution, but the idea that adaptation is also shaped by mutational variation is controversial. Simple evolutionary hypotheses predict such a relationship if the supply of mutations constrains evolution, but it is not clear that constraints exist, and, even if they do, they may be overcome by long-term natural selection. Quantification of the relationship between mutation and phenotypic divergence among species will help to resolve these issues. Here we use precise data on over...

Data from: Evaluating the performance of anchored hybrid enrichment at the tips of the tree of life: a phylogenetic analysis of Australian Eugongylus group scincid lizards

Matthew C. Brandley, Jason G. Bragg, Sonal Singhal, David G. Chapple, Charlotte K. Jennings, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily M. Lemmon, Michael B. Thompson & Craig Moritz
Background: High-throughput sequencing using targeted enrichment and transcriptomic methods enables rapid construction of phylogenomic data sets incorporating hundreds to thousands of loci. These advances have enabled access to an unprecedented amount of nucleotide sequence data, but they also pose new questions. Given that the loci targeted for enrichment are often highly conserved, how informative are they at different taxonomic scales, especially at the intraspecific / phylogeographic scale? We investigate this question using Australian scincid lizards...

Data from: Global biogeography of mating system variation in seed plants

David A. Moeller, Ryan D. Briscoe Runquist, Annika M. Moe, Monica A. Geber, Carol Goodwillie, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou, Christopher G. Eckert, Elizabeth Elle, Mark O. Johnston, Susan Kalisz, Richard H. Ree, Risa D. Sargent, Mario Vallejo-Marin & Alice A. Winn
Latitudinal gradients in biotic interactions have been suggested as causes of global patterns of biodiversity and phenotypic variation. Plant biologists have long speculated that outcrossing mating systems are more common at low than high latitudes owing to a greater predictability of plant–pollinator interactions in the tropics; however, these ideas have not previously been tested. Here, we present the first global biogeographic analysis of plant mating systems based on 624 published studies from 492 taxa. We...

Data from: Resolving relationships among the megadiverse butterflies and moths with a novel pipeline for Anchored Phylogenomics

Jesse W. Breinholt, Chandra Earl, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Lei Xiao & Akito Y. Kawahara
The advent of next-generation sequencing technology has allowed for the collection of large portions of the genome for phylogenetic analysis. Hybrid enrichment and transcriptomics are two techniques that leverage next-generation sequencing and have shown much promise. However, methods for processing hybrid enrichment data are still limited. We developed a pipeline for anchored hybrid enrichment (AHE) read assembly, orthology determination, contamination screening, and data processing for sequences flanking the target “probe” region. We apply this approach...

Data from: Time since disturbance affects colonization dynamics in a metapopulation

Jessie Mutz, Nora Underwood & Brian D. Inouye
1. Disturbances are widespread in nature and can have substantial population-level consequences. Most empirical studies on the effects of disturbance track population recovery within habitat patches, but have an incomplete representation of the recolonization process. Additionally, recent metapopulation models represent post-disturbance colonization with a recovery state or time-lag for disturbed (“focal”) patches, thus assuming that recolonization rates are uniform. 2. However, the availability of colonists in neighboring “source” patches can vary, especially in frequently-disturbed landscapes...

Data from: Resolving rapid radiations within angiosperm families using anchored phylogenomics

Étienne Léveillé-Bourret, Julian R. Starr, Bruce A. Ford, Emily Moriarty Lemmon & Alan R. Lemmon
Despite the promise that molecular data would provide a seemingly unlimited source of independent characters, many plant phylogenetic studies are still based on only two regions, the plastid genome and nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA). Their popularity can be explained by high copy numbers and universal PCR primers that make their sequences easily amplified and converted into parallel datasets. Unfortunately, their utility is limited by linked loci and limited characters resulting in low confidence in the...

Data from: Pervasive indirect genetic effects on behavioral development in polymorphic eastern mosquitofish

Brittany Kraft, Valerie A. Lemakos, Joseph Travis & Kimberly A. Hughes
The social environment can dramatically influence development and expression of individual behavior. Indirect genetic effects (IGE) arise when variation in the social environment depend on genotypic differences among social partners. Their role in generating variation and in influencing evolutionary dynamics has become increasingly recognized in recent years, but less attention has been paid to how indirect genetic effects arise during development. Here, we measure IGE during development using a discrete natural polymorphism in male coloration...

Data from: Anchored hybrid enrichment provides new insights into the phylogeny and evolution of longhorned beetles (Cerambycidae)

Stephanie Haddad, Seunggwan Shin, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Petr Svacha, Brian Farrell, Adam Ślipiński, Donald Windsor & Duane D. McKenna
Cerambycidae is a species-rich family of mostly wood-feeding (xylophagous) beetles containing nearly 35 000 known species. The higher-level phylogeny of Cerambycidae has never been robustly reconstructed using molecular phylogenetic data or a comprehensive sample of higher taxa, and its internal relationships and evolutionary history remain the subjects of ongoing debate. We reconstructed the higher-level phylogeny of Cerambycidae using phylogenomic data from 522 single copy nuclear genes, generated via anchored hybrid enrichment. Our taxon sample (31...

Data from: A genome-wide phylogeny of jumping spiders (Araneae, Salticidae), using anchored hybrid enrichment

Wayne P. Maddison, Samuel C. Evans, Chris A. Hamilton, Jason E. Bond, Alan R. Lemmon & Emily Moriarty Lemmon
We present the first genome-wide molecular phylogeny of jumping spiders (Araneae: Salticidae), inferred from Anchored Hybrid Enrichment (AHE) sequence data. From 12 outgroups plus 34 salticid taxa representing all but one subfamily and most major groups recognized in previous work, we obtained 447 loci totalling 96,946 aligned nucleotide sites. Our analyses using concatenated likelihood, parsimony, and coalescent methods (ASTRAL and SVDQuartets) strongly confirm most previous results, resolving as monophyletic the Spartaeinae, Salticinae (with the hisponines...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Florida State University
    12
  • Australian National University
    2
  • University of Ottawa
    2
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • University of Memphis
    1
  • University of Iceland
    1
  • Dalhousie University
    1
  • University of Windsor
    1