4 Works

Data from: Costs of sleeping in: circadian rhythms influence cuckoldry risk in a songbird

Timothy Greives, Sjouke Kingma, Bart Kranstauber, Kim Mortega, Martin Wikelski, Kees Van Oers, Christa Mateman, Glen Ferguson, Giulia Beltrami, Michaela Hau, Sjouke A. Kingma & Timothy J. Greives
1. Circadian (i.e. daily) regulation of behaviors is thought to provide fitness benefits to organisms by enabling them to anticipate diel changes in the environment, such as sunrise. 2. A common behavior among socially monogamous songbirds that usually takes place in the early mornings is extra-pair mating, i.e. copulating with partners outside of the social pair bond. 3. Thus, variation in when individuals begin their daily activity may influence their reproductive success; early risers may...

Data from: Age, oxidative stress exposure and fitness in a long-lived seabird

Katherine A. Herborn, Francis Daunt, Britt J. Heidinger, Hanna M. V. Granroth-Wilding, Sarah J. Burthe, Mark A. Newell & Pat Monaghan
The need to manage exposure to oxidative stress, which can damage macromolecules, is thought to influence the resolution of life history trade-offs. Oxidative damage is expected to increase with age as a consequence of changes in the optimal investment in defences or repair, and/or because of senescence in antioxidant defence systems, though the pattern might differ between short and long-lived species. However, data on age related changes in damage levels in wild populations are rare....

Data from: Fungal specificity and selectivity for algae play a major role in determining lichen partnerships across diverse ecogeographic regions in the lichen-forming family Parmeliaceae

Steven D. Leavitt, Ekaphan Kraichak, Matthew P. Nelsen, Susanne Altermann, Pradeep K. Divakar, David Alors, Theodore L. Esslinger, Ana Crespo, H. Thorsten Lumbsch & Thorsten Lumbsch
Microbial symbionts are instrumental to the ecological and long-term evolutionary success of their hosts, and the central role of symbiotic interactions is increasingly recognized across the vast majority of life. Lichens provide an iconic group for investigating patterns in species interactions; however, relationships among lichen symbionts are often masked by uncertain species boundaries or an inability to reliably identify symbionts. The species-rich lichen-forming fungal family Parmeliaceae provides a diverse group for assessing patterns of interactions...

Data from: Selection on bristle length has the ability to drive the evolution of male abdominal appendages in the sepsid fly Themira biloba

Bodini Herath, Ned A. Dochtermann, Joshua I. Johnson, Zachary Leonard & Julia H. Bowsher
Many exaggerated and novel traits are strongly influenced by sexual selection. Although sexual selection is a powerful evolutionary force, underlying genetic interactions can constrain evolutionary outcomes. The relative strength of selection vs. constraint has been a matter of debate for the evolution of male abdominal appendages in sepsid flies. These abdominal appendages are involved in courtship and mating, but their function has not been directly tested. We performed mate choice experiments to determine whether sexual...

Registration Year

  • 2015
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Affiliations

  • North Dakota State University
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  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
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  • Stanford University
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  • Field Museum of Natural History
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  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
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  • University of Glasgow
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  • University of Groningen
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  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
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  • University of Edinburgh
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  • University of Chicago
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