10 Works

Data from: Aphid symbionts and endogenous resistance traits mediate competition between rival parasitoids

Laura J. Kraft, James Kopco, Jason P. Harmon & Kerry M. Oliver
Insects use endogenous mechanisms and infection with protective symbionts to thwart attacks from natural enemies. Defenses that target specific enemies, however, potentially mediate competition between rivals and thereby impact community composition. Following its introduction to North America to control pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum), the parasitoid Aphidius ervi competitively displaced other parasitoids, except for the native Praon pequodorum. The pea aphid exhibits tremendous clonal variation in resistance to A. ervi, primarily through infection with the heritable...

Data from: Do glucocorticoids predict fitness? Linking environmental conditions, corticosterone and reproductive success in the blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus

Lindsay J. Henderson, Neil P. Evans, Britt J. Heidinger, Katherine A. Herborn & Kathryn E. Arnold
Glucocorticoids, including corticosterone (CORT), have been suggested to provide a physiological link between ecological conditions and fitness. Specifically, CORT, which is elevated in response to harsh conditions, is predicted to be correlated with reduced fitness. Yet, empirical studies show that CORT can be non-significantly, positively and negatively linked with fitness. Divergent environmental conditions between years or study systems may influence whether CORT is linked to fitness. To test this, we monitored free-living blue tits (Cyanistes...

Data from: Restoring fire to grasslands is critical for migrating shorebird populations

Torre J. Hovick, J. Matthew Carroll, R. Dwayne Elmore, Craig A. Davis & Samuel D. Fuhlendorf
Fire is a disturbance process that maintains the structure and function of grassland ecosystems while sustaining grassland biodiversity. Conversion of grasslands to other land uses coupled with altered disturbance regimes have greatly diminished the habitat available to many grassland dependent species. These changes have been linked to declines in breeding bird populations, but may also be critical for migrating bird populations such as those shorebird species that depend on mesic grasslands during migration. We examined...

Data from: Reproductive plasticity and landscape heterogeneity benefit a ground-nesting bird in a fire-prone ecosystem

J. Matthew Carroll, Torre J. Hovick, Craig A. Davis, Robert Dwayne Elmore & Samuel D. Fuhlendorf
Disturbance is critical for the conservation of rangeland ecosystems worldwide and many of these systems are fire dependent. Although it is well established that restoring fire as an ecological process can lead to increased biodiversity in grasslands and shrublands, the underlying mechanisms driving community patterns are poorly understood for fauna in fire-prone landscapes. Much of this uncertainty stems from the paucity of studies that examine the effects of fire at scales relevant to organism life...

Data from: The geometric framework for nutrition reveals interactions between protein and carbohydrate during larval growth in honey bees

Bryan R. Helm, Garett P. Slater, Arun Rajamohan, George D. Yocum, Kendra J. Greenlee & Julia H. Bowsher
In holometabolous insects, larval nutrition affects adult body size, a life history trait with a profound influence on performance and fitness. Individual nutritional components of larval diets are often complex and may interact with one another, necessitating the use of a geometric framework for elucidating nutritional effects. In the honey bee, Apis mellifera, nurse bees provision food to developing larvae, directly moderating growth rates and caste development. However, the eusocial nature of honey bees makes...

Data from: Early to rise, early to breed: a role for daily rhythms in seasonal reproduction

Jessica L. Graham, Natalie J. Cook, Katie B. Needham, Michaela Hau & Timothy J. Greives
Vertebrates use environmental cues to time reproduction to optimal breeding conditions. Numerous laboratory studies have revealed that light experienced during a critical window of the circadian (daily) rhythm can influence reproductive physiology. However, whether these relationships observed in captivity hold true under natural conditions and how they relate to observed variation in timing of reproductive output remains largely unexplored. Here we test the hypothesis that individual variation in daily timing recorded in nature (i.e. chronotype)...

Data from: A pre-breeding immune challenge delays reproduction in the female dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis)

Katie B. Needham, Natalie J. Cook, Alexa R. Rutherford & Timothy J. Greives
Precise timing of life-history transitions in predictably changing environments is hypothesized to aid in individual survival and reproductive success, by appropriately matching an animal's physiology and behavior with prevailing environmental conditions. Therefore, it is imperative for individuals to time energetically costly life-history stages (i.e. reproduction) so they overlap with seasonal peaks in food abundance and quality. Female lifetime reproductive fitness is affected by several factors that influence energy balance, including arrival date, timing of egg...

Data from: Combined effects of night warming and light pollution on predator-prey interactions

Colleen R. Miller, Brandon T. Barton, Likai Zhu, Volker C. Radeloff, Kerry M. Oliver, Jason P. Harmon & Anthony R. Ives
Interactions between multiple anthropogenic environmental changes can drive non-additive effects in ecological systems, and the non-additive effects can in turn be amplified or dampened by spatial covariation among environmental changes. We investigated the combined effects of night-time warming and light pollution on pea aphids and two predatory ladybeetle species. As expected, neither night-time warming nor light pollution changed the suppression of aphids by the ladybeetle species that forages effectively in darkness. However, for the more-visual...

Data from: Physconia labrata, a new species from western North America and Asia

Theodore L. Esslinger, Bruce McCune & Diane L. Haughland
A new species belonging to the lichen genus Physconia is described from Alaska and the Canadian and American Rocky Mountains and adjacent forested regions. It is also reported from China, Nepal, India and Siberia. The new species, Physconia labrata, is superficially similar to P. perisidiosa, but can be distinguished by having a blackened, corticate lower surface and a paraplectenchymatous upper cortex.

Data from: Pyric-carnivory: raptor use of prescribed fires

Torre J. Hovick, Devan A. McGranahan, Robert Dwayne Elmore, John R. Weir & Samuel D. Fuhlendorf
Fire is a process that shaped and maintained most terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. Changes in land use and patterns of human settlement have altered fire regimes and led to fire suppression resulting in numerous undesirable consequences spanning individual species and entire ecosystems. Many obvious and direct consequences of fire suppression have been well studied, but several, albeit less obvious, costs of alteration to fire regimes on wildlife are unknown. One such phenomenon is the response of...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    10

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    10

Affiliations

  • North Dakota State University
    10
  • Oklahoma State University
    3
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • Newcastle University
    1
  • Linyi University
    1
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    1
  • Benedictine College
    1