41 Works

Data from: Grazing effects on surface energy fluxes in a desert steppe on the Mongolian Plateau

Changliang Shao, Jiquan Chen, Linghao Li, Gang Dong, Juanjuan Han, Michael Abraha & Ranjeet John
Quantifying the surface energy fluxes of grazed and ungrazed steppes is essential to understand the roles of grasslands in local and global climate and in land use change. We used paired eddy-covariance towers to investigate the effects of grazing on energy balance (EB) components: net radiation (Rn), latent heat (LE), sensible heat (H), and soil heat (G) fluxes on adjacent grazed and ungrazed areas in a desert steppe of the Mongolian Plateau for a two-year...

Data from: The influence of balanced and imbalanced resource supply on biodiversity-functioning relationship across ecosystems

Aleksandra M. Lewandowska, Antje Biermann, Elizabeth T. Borer, Miguel A. Cebrian-Piqueras, Steven A. J. Declerck, Luc De Meester, Ellen Van Donk, Lars Gamfeldt, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Kevin P. Kirkman, Christopher A. Klausmeier, Michael Kleyer, Johannes M. H. Knops, Pieter Lemmens, Eric M. Lind, Elena Litchman, Jasmin Mantilla-Contreras, Koen Martens, Sandra Meier, Vanessa Minden, Joslin L. Moore, Harry Olde Venterink, Eric W. Seabloom … & Helmut Hillebrand
Numerous studies show that increasing species richness leads to higher ecosystem productivity. This effect is often attributed to more efficient portioning of multiple resources in communities with higher numbers of competing species, indicating the role of resource supply and stoichiometry for biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships. Here, we merged theory on ecological stoichiometry with a framework of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning to understand how resource use transfers into primary production. We applied a structural equation model to define patterns...

Data from: Increases in the mean and variability of thermal regimes result in differential phenotypic responses among genotypes during early ontogenetic stages of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)

Kari J. Dammerman, Juan P. Steibel & Kim T. Scribner
Climate change is affecting thermal conditions worldwide. Understanding organismal responses associated with predicted changes are essential for predicting population persistence. Few studies have examined the effects of both increased mean and variance in temperature on organismal traits, particularly during early life stages. Using lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) from Black Lake, MI, we tested whether phenotypic variation differed among families reared in two constant (10 and 18°C) and two fluctuating temperature treatments (10-19°C) representing temperatures experienced...

Data from: Juvenile concentrations of IGF-1 predict life-history trade-offs in a wild mammal

Nora Lewin, Eli M. Swanson, Barry L. Williams & Kay E. Holekamp
Early postnatal development can have profound effects on life-history traits later in life. One mechanism hypothesized to mediate this relationship is the anabolic hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). IGF-1 contributes importantly to postnatal growth, and thus offers a means by which environmental and genetic variation might direct organismal development, reproduction and survival. We tested whether juvenile concentrations of IGF-1 can predict intraspecific variation in life-history traits later in life using longitudinal data from free-living female...

Data from: Long-term nitrous oxide fluxes in annual and perennial agricultural and unmanaged ecosystems in the upper Midwest USA

Ilya Gelfand, Iurii Shcherbak, Neville Millar, Alexandra N. Kravchenko & G. Philip Robertson
Differences in soil nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes among ecosystems are often difficult to evaluate and predict due to high spatial and temporal variabilities and few direct experimental comparisons. For 20 years, we measured N2O fluxes in 11 ecosystems in southwest Michigan USA: four annual grain crops (corn–soybean–wheat rotations) managed with conventional, no-till, reduced input, or biologically based/organic inputs; three perennial crops (alfalfa, poplar, and conifers); and four unmanaged ecosystems of different successional age including mature...

Data from: Reduced snow cover increases wintertime nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from an agricultural soil in the upper U.S. Midwest

Leilei Ruan & G. Philip Robertson
Throughout most of the northern hemisphere, snow cover decreased in almost every winter month from 1967 to 2012. Because snow is an effective insulator, snow cover loss has likely enhanced soil freezing and the frequency of soil freeze–thaw cycles, which can disrupt soil nitrogen dynamics including the production of nitrous oxide (N2O). We used replicated automated gas flux chambers deployed in an annual cropping system in the upper Midwest US for three winters (December–March, 2011–2013)...

Data from: Climate structures genetic variation across a species' elevation range: a test of range limits hypotheses

Jason P. Sexton, Matthew B. Hufford, Ashley Bateman, David B. Lowry, Harald Meimberg, Sharon Y. Strauss, Kevin J. Rice & Ashley C.Bateman
Gene flow may influence the formation of species range limits, yet little is known about the patterns of gene flow with respect to environmental gradients or proximity to range limits. With rapid environmental change it is especially important to understand patterns of gene flow to inform conservation efforts. Here we investigate the species range of the selfing, annual plant, Mimulus laciniatus, in the California Sierra Nevada. We assessed genetic variation, gene flow, and population abundance...

Data from: Different evolutionary paths to complexity for small and large populations of digital organisms

Thomas LaBar & Christoph Adami
A major aim of evolutionary biology is to explain the respective roles of adaptive versus non-adaptive changes in the evolution of complexity. While selection is certainly responsible for the spread and maintenance of complex phenotypes, this does not automatically imply that strong selection enhances the chance for the emergence of novel traits, that is, the origination of complexity. Population size is one parameter that alters the relative importance of adaptive and non-adaptive processes: as population...

Data from: Expansion and diversification of the MSDIN family of cyclic peptide genes in the poisonous agarics Amanita phalloides and A. bisporigera

Jane A. Pulman, Kevin L. Childs, R. Michael Sgambelluri & Jonathan D. Walton
Background: The cyclic peptide toxins of Amanita mushrooms, such as α-amanitin and phalloidin, are encoded by the “MSDIN” gene family and ribosomally biosynthesized. Based on partial genome sequence and PCR analysis, some members of the MSDIN family were previously identified in Amanita bisporigera, and several other members are known from other species of Amanita. However, the complete complement in any one species, and hence the genetic capacity for these fungi to make cyclic peptides, remains...

Data from: Partitioning the effects of isolation by distance, environment, and physical barriers on genomic divergence between parapatric threespine stickleback

Jesse N. Weber, Gideon S. Bradburd, Yoel E. Stuart, William E. Stutz & Daniel I. Bolnick
Genetic divergence between populations is shaped by a combination of drift, migration, and selection, yielding patterns of isolation-by-distance (IBD) and isolation-by-environment (IBE). Unfortunately, IBD and IBE may be confounded when comparing divergence across habitat boundaries. For instance, parapatric lake and stream threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) may have diverged due to selection against migrants (IBE), or mere spatial separation (IBD). To quantitatively partition the strength of IBE and IBD, we used recently-developed population genetic software (BEDASSLE)...

Data from: Field measurements of genotype by environment interaction for fitness caused by spontaneous mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana

Angela J. Roles, Matthew Thomas Rutter, Ian Dworkin, Charles B. Fenster & Jeffrey K. Conner
As the ultimate source of genetic diversity, spontaneous mutation is critical to the evolutionary process. The fitness effects of spontaneous mutations are almost always studied under controlled laboratory conditions rather than under the evolutionarily relevant conditions of the field. Of particular interest is the conditionality of new mutations - i.e., is a new mutation harmful regardless of the environment in which it is found? In other words, what is the extent of genotype-environment interaction for...

Data from: Adaptive divergence in flowering time among natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana: estimates of selection and QTL mapping

Jon Ågren, Christopher G. Oakley, Sverre Lundemo & Douglas W. Schemske
To identify the ecological and genetic mechanisms of local adaptation requires estimating selection on traits, identifying their genetic basis, and evaluating whether divergence in adaptive traits is due to conditional neutrality or genetic tradeoffs. To this end, we conducted field experiments for three years using recombinant inbred lines derived from two ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana (Italy, Sweden), and at each parental site examined selection on flowering time and mapped QTL. There was strong selection for...

Data from: Experimental evidence does not support the Habitat Amount Hypothesis

Nick M. Haddad, Andrew Gonzalez, Lars A. Brudvig, Melissa A. Burt, Douglas J. Levey & Ellen I. Damschen
For a half century, habitat configuration – the arrangement of habitat patches within a landscape – has been central to theories of landscape ecology, population dynamics, and community assembly, in addition to conservation strategies. A recent hypothesis advanced by Fahrig (2013) would, if supported, greatly diminish the relevance of habitat configuration as a predictor of diversity. The Habitat Amount Hypothesis posits that the sample area effect overrides patch size and patch isolation effects of habitat...

Data from: Ecological speciation of bacteriophage lambda in allopatry and sympatry

Justin R. Meyer, Devin T. Dobias, Sarah J. Medina, Lisa Servilio, Animesh Gupta & Richard E. Lenski
Understanding the conditions that allow speciation to occur is difficult because most research has focused on either long-lived organisms or asexual microorganisms. We propagated bacteriophage λ, a virus with rapid generations and frequent recombination, on two Escherichia coli host genotypes that expressed either the LamB or OmpF receptor. When supplied with either single host (allopatry), λ improved its binding to the available receptor while losing its ability to use the alternative. When evolving on both...

Data from: Evolution of reproductive isolation in stickleback fish

Alycia C. R. Lackey & Janette Wenrick Boughman
To understand how new species form and what causes their collapse, we examined how reproductive isolation evolves during the speciation process, considering species pairs with little to extensive divergence, including a recently collapsed pair. We estimated many reproductive barriers in each of five sets of stickleback fish species pairs using our own data and decades of previous work. We found that the types of barriers important early in the speciation process differ from those important...

Data from: Crop-associated virus infection in a native perennial grass: reduction in plant fitness and dynamic patterns of virus detection

Helen M. Alexander, Emily Bruns, Hayley Schebor & Carolyn M. Malmstrom
To understand the eco-evolutionary significance of plant viruses in nature, we must (i) quantify the effects of infection on plant fitness and (ii) recognize that native plants are increasingly exposed to crop-associated viruses. Studies of perennials are particularly needed: most of our knowledge of plant-virus interactions is from annuals, yet long-lived species dominate landscapes. Here we used aster models for life-history analysis and longitudinal measures of plant virus status to evaluate multi-year consequences of crop...

Data from: Immunoglobulin detection in wild birds: effectiveness of three secondary anti-avian IgY antibodies in direct ELISAs in 41 avian species

Carol A. Fassbinder-Orth, Travis E. Wilcoxen, Tiffany Tran, Raoul K. Boughton, Jeanne M. Fair, Erik K. Hofmeister, Jennifer L. Grindstaff & Jen C. Owen
1.Immunological reagents for wild, non-model species are limited or often non-existent for many species. 2. In this study, we compare the reactivity of a new anti-passerine IgY secondary antibody with existing secondary antibodies developed for use with birds. Samples from 41 species from the following six avian orders were analysed: Anseriformes (1 family, 1 species), Columbiformes (1 family, 2 species), Galliformes (1 family, 1 species), Passeriformes (16 families, 34 species), Piciformes (1 family, 2 species)...

Data from: The ‘heritability’ of domestication and its functional partitioning in the pig

Miguel Perez-Enciso, Gustavo De Los Campos, Nick Hudson, James Kijas & Antonio Reverter
We propose to estimate the proportion of variance explained by regression on genome-wide markers (or genomic heritability) when wild/domestic status is considered the phenotype of interest. This approach differs from the standard Fst in that it can accommodate genetic similarity between individuals in a general form. We apply this strategy to complete genome data from 47 wild and domestic pigs from Asia and Europe. When we partitioned the total genomic variance into components associated to...

Data from: Adaptive divergence despite strong genetic drift: genomic analysis of the evolutionary mechanisms causing genetic differentiation in the island fox (Urocyon littoralis)

W. Chris Funk, Robert E. Lovich, Paul A. Hohenlohe, Courtney A. Hofman, Scott A. Morrison, T. Scott Sillett, Cameron K. Ghalambor, Jesús E. Maldonado, Torben C. Rick, Mitch D. Day, Nicholas R. Polato, Sarah W. Fizpatrick, Timothy J. Coonan, Kevin R. Crooks, Adam Dillon, David K. Garcelon, Julie L. King, Christina L. Boser, Nicholas Gould, William F. Andelt & Sarah W. Fitzpatrick
The evolutionary mechanisms generating the tremendous biodiversity of islands have long fascinated evolutionary biologists. Genetic drift and divergent selection are predicted to be strong on islands and both could drive population divergence and speciation. Alternatively, strong genetic drift may preclude adaptation. We conducted a genomic analysis to test the roles of genetic drift and divergent selection in causing genetic differentiation among populations of the island fox (Urocyon littoralis). This species consists of six subspecies, each...

Data from: Host coevolution alters the adaptive landscape of a virus

Alita R. Burmeister, Richard E. Lenski & Justin R. Meyer
The origin of new and complex structures and functions is fundamental for shaping the diversity of life. Such key innovations are rare because they require multiple interacting changes. We sought to understand how the adaptive landscape led to an innovation whereby bacteriophage λ evolved the new ability to exploit a receptor, OmpF, on Escherichia coli cells. Previous work showed that this ability evolved repeatedly, despite requiring four mutations in one virus gene. Here, we examine...

Data from: Intra-organ growth coordination in Drosophila is mediated by systemic ecdysone signaling

Rewatee H. Gokhale, Takashi Hayashi, Christopher D. Mirque & Alexander W. Shingleton
Regulation of final organ size is a complex developmental process that involves the integration of systemic and organ-specific processes. Previously, we have shown that in developing Drosophila, perturbing the growth of one imaginal disc – the parts of a holometabolous larva that become the external adult organs – retards growth of other discs and delays development, resulting in tight inter-organ growth coordination and the generation of a correctly proportioned adult. Whether different parts of the...

Data from: Tipping the scales: evolution of the allometric slope independent of average trait size

R. Craig Stillwell, Alexander W. Shingleton, Ian Dworkin & W. Anthony Frankino
The scaling of body parts is central to the expression of morphology across body sizes and to the generation of morphological diversity within and among species. Although patterns of scaling-relationship evolution have been well documented for over one hundred years, little is known regarding how selection acts to generate these patterns. In part, this is because it is unclear the extent to which the elements of log-linear scaling relationships – the intercept or mean trait...

Data from: Ecological genomics of mutualism decline in nitrogen-fixing bacteria

Christie R. Klinger, Jennifer A. Lau & Katy D. Heath
Anthropogenic changes can influence mutualism evolution; however, the genomic regions underpinning mutualism that are most affected by environmental change are generally unknown, even in well-studied model mutualisms like the interaction between legumes and their nitrogen (N)-fixing rhizobia. Such genomic information can shed light on the agents and targets of selection maintaining cooperation in nature. We recently demonstrated that N-fertilization has caused an evolutionary decline in mutualistic partner quality in the rhizobia that form symbiosis with...

Data from: An Avida-ED digital evolution curriculum for undergraduate biology

James J. Smith, Wendy R. Johnson, Amy M. Lark, Louise S. Mead, Michael J. Wiser & Robert T. Pennock
We present an inquiry-based curriculum based on the digital evolution platform Avida-ED (http://​avida-ed.​msu.​edu). We designed an instructional sequence and lab book consisting of an introduction to Avida-ED and a set of three lessons focused on specific evolutionary concepts. These served to familiarize students with experimental evolution and Avida-ED. Students then developed independent Avida-ED research projects to test their own questions. Curriculum design and implementation occurred over the course or two semesters, with a pilot implementation...

Data from: Assessing faculty professional development in STEM higher education: sustainability of outcomes

Terry L. Derting, Heather A. Passmore, Timothy P. Henkel, Bryan Arnold, Jessica Middlemis Maher & Diane Ebert-May
We tested the effectiveness of Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching IV (FIRST), a professional development program for postdoctoral scholars, by conducting a study of program alumni. Faculty professional development programs are critical components of efforts to improve teaching and learning in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, but reliable evidence of the sustained impacts of these programs is lacking. We used a paired design in which we matched a FIRST alumnus employed...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
    41

Affiliations

  • Michigan State University
    41
  • University of Minnesota
    4
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    4
  • McMaster University
    3
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    3
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • University of California, San Diego
    2
  • Murray State University
    2
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    2
  • University of Nebraska - Lincoln
    2