3 Works

Phylogeny of the supertribe Nebriitae (Coleoptera: Carabidae) based on analyses of DNA sequence data

David H. Kavanaugh, David Maddison, W. Brian Simison, Sean D. Schoville, Joachim Schmidt, Arnaud Faille, Wendy Moore, James M. Pflug, Sophie L. Archambeault, Tinya Hoang & Jei-Ying Chen
The phylogeny of the carabid beetle supertribe Nebriitae is inferred from analyses of DNA sequence data from eight gene fragments including one nuclear ribosomal gene (28S), four nuclear-protein coding genes (CAD, topoisomerase 1, PEPCK and wingless) and three mitochondrial gene fragments (16S + tRNA-Leu + ND1, COI (“barcode” region) and COI (“Pat/Jer” region)). Our taxon sample included 264 exemplars representing 241 species and subspecies (25% of the known nebriite fauna), 39 of 41 currently accepted...

New Sclerocephalus species and temnospondyl braincase evolution

Rainer Schoch & Gabriela Sobral
The late Paleozoic temnospondyl Sclerocephalus formed an aquatic top predator in various Central European lakes of the Late Carboniferous and early Permian. Despite hundreds of specimens spanning a wide range of sizes, knowledge of the endocranium (braincase and palatoquadrate) remained very insufficient in Sclerocephalus and other stereospondylomorphs, because even large skulls had unossified endocrania. A new specimen from a stratigraphically ancient deposit is recognized as representing a new taxon, S. concordiae n. sp., and reveals...

Data from: Evolution of flexible biting in hyperdiverse parasitoid wasps

Thomas Van De Kamp, István Mikó, Arnold H. Staniczek, Benjamin Eggs, Daria Bajerlein, Tomáš Faragó, Lea Hagelstein, Elias Hamann, Rebecca Spiecker, Tilo Baumbach, Petr Janšta & Lars Krogmann
One key event in insect evolution was the development of mandibles with two joints, which allowed powerful biting, but restricted their movement to a single degree of freedom. These mandibles define the Dicondylia, which constitute over 99 percent of all extant insect species. It was common doctrine that the dicondylic articulation of chewing mandibles remained unaltered for more than 400 million years. We report highly modified mandibles overcoming the restrictions of a single degree of...

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  • Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart
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