15 Works

Data from: Long telomeres are associated with clonality in wild populations of the fissiparous starfish Coscinasterias tenuispina

Alex Garcia-Cisneros, Rocío Pérez-Portela, Bethanie C. Almroth, Sofie Degerman, Creu Palacín & Helen Nilsson Sköld
TelTelomeres usually shorten during an organism’s lifespan and have thus been used as an aging and health marker. When telomeres become sufficiently short, senescence is induced. The most common method of restoring telomere length is via telomerase reverse transcriptase activity, highly expressed during embryogenesis. However, although asexual reproduction from adult tissues has an important role in the life cycles of certain species, its effect on the aging and fitness of wild populations, as well as...

Data from: Time for recovery of riparian plants in restored northern Swedish streams: a chronosequence study

Eliza Maher Hasselquist, Christer Nilsson, Joakim Hjältén, Dolly Jørgensen, Lovisa Lind & Lina E. Polvi
A lack of ecological responses in stream restoration projects has been prevalent throughout recent literature with many studies reporting insufficient time for recovery. We assessed the relative importance of time, site variables, and landscape setting for understanding how plant species richness and understory productivity recover over time in riparian zones of northern Swedish streams. We used a space-for-time substitution consisting of 13 stream reaches restored 5–25 years ago, as well as five unrestored channelized reference...

Data from: Edge influence on vegetation at natural and anthropogenic edges of boreal forests in Canada and Fennoscandia

Karen A. Harper, S. Ellen Macdonald, Michael S. Mayerhofer, Shekhar R. Biswas, Per-Anders Esseen, Kristoffer Hylander, Katherine J. Stewart, Azim U. Mallik, Pierre Drapeau, Bengt-Gunnar Jonsson, Daniel Lesieur, Jari Kouki & Yves Bergeron
1. Although anthropogenic edges are an important consequence of timber harvesting, edges due to natural disturbances or landscape heterogeneity are also common. Forest edges have been well-studied in temperate and tropical forests, but less so in less productive, disturbance-adapted boreal forests. 2. We synthesized data on forest vegetation at edges of boreal forests and compared edge influence among edge types (fire, cut, lake/wetland; old vs. young), forest types (broadleaf vs. coniferous) and geographic regions. Our...

Data from: Testing for Depéret’s rule (body size increase) in mammals using combined extinct and extant data

Folmer Bokma, Marc Godinot, Olivier Maridet, Sandrine Ladevèze, Loïc Costeur, Floréal Solé, Emmanuel Gheerbrant, Stéphane Peigné, Florian Jacques & Michel Laurin
Whether or not evolutionary lineages in general show a tendency to increase in body size has often been discussed. This tendency has been dubbed “Cope's rule” but because Cope never hypothesized it, we suggest renaming it after Depéret, who formulated it clearly in 1907. Depéret's rule has traditionally been studied using fossil data, but more recently a number of studies have used present-day species. While several paleontological studies of Cenozoic placental mammals have found support...

Data from: Cold tadpoles from Arctic environments waste less nutrients – high gross growth efficiencies lead to low consumer-mediated nutrient recycling in the North

Antonia Liess, Martin I. Lind, Junwen Guo & Owen Rowe
1. Endothermic organisms can adapt to short growing seasons, low temperatures and nutrient limitation by developing high growth rates and high gross growth efficiencies (GGEs). Animals with high GGEs are better at assimilating limiting nutrients and thus should recycle (or lose) fewer nutrients. Longer guts in relation to body mass may facilitate higher GGE under resource limitation. 2. Within the context of ecological stoichiometry theory, this study combines ecology with evolution by relating latitudinal life-history...

Data from: Colonization of the Mediterranean Basin by the vector biting midge species Culicoides imicola: an old story

Stephanie Jacquet, Claire Garros, Eric Lombaert, Catherine Walton, Johana Restrepo, Xavier Allene, Thierry Baldet, Catherine Cetre-Sossah, Alexandra Chaskopoulou, Jean-Claude Delecolle, Amelie Desvars, Mouloud Djerbal, Moussa Fall, Laetitia Gardes, Michel De Garine-Wichatitsky, Maria Goffredo, Yuval Gottlieb, Assane Gueye Fall, Muo Kasina, Karien Labuschagne, Youssef Lhor, Javier Lucientes, Thibaud Martin, Bruno Mathieu, Miguel Miranda … & J.-C. Delecolle
Understanding the demographic history and genetic make-up of colonizing species is critical for inferring population sources and colonization routes. This is of main interest for designing accurate control measures in areas newly colonized by vector species of economically important pathogens. The biting midge Culicoides imicola is a major vector of orbiviruses to livestock. Historically, the distribution of this species was limited to the Afrotropical region. Entomological surveys first revealed the presence of C. imicola in...

Data from: Multilocus analysis of nucleotide variation and speciation in three closely related Populus (Salicaceae) species

Shuhui Du, Zhaoshan Wang, Pär K. Ingvarsson, Junhui Wang, Zhiqiang Wu, Luke R. Tembrock & Jianguo Zhang
Historical tectonism and climate oscillations can isolate and contract the geographical distributions of many plant species, and they are even known to trigger species divergence and ultimately speciation. Here, we estimated the nucleotide variation and speciation in three closely related Populus species, Populus tremuloides, P. tremula and P. davidiana, distributed in North America and Eurasia. We analysed the sequence variation in six single-copy nuclear loci and three chloroplast (cpDNA) fragments in 497 individuals sampled from...

Data from: Axl-regulating tumor suppressor miR-34a increased in ccRCC but not correlating with Axl mRNA or Axl protein levels

Helena K. M. Fritz, Anna Gustafsson, Börje Ljungberg, Yvonne Ceder, Håkan Axelson, Björn Dahlbäck & Helena K. Fritz
Background: High expression of the receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is associated with poor prognosis in patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy of the kidney. The miR-34a has been shown to directly regulate Axl in cancer cells. The miR-34a is a mediator of p53-dependent tumor suppression, and low expression of miR-34a has been associated with worse prognosis in several cancers. Our aim was to elucidate whether miR-34a or the other members of...

Data from: Stoichiometric imbalances between detritus and detritivores are related to shifts in ecosystem functioning

André Frainer, Jérémy Jabiol, Mark O. Gessner, Andreas Bruder, Eric Chauvet, Brendan McKie & Brendan G. McKie
How are resource consumption and growth rates of litter-consuming detritivores affected by imbalances between consumer and litter C:N:P ratios? To address this question, we offered leaf litter as food to three aquatic detritivore species, which represent a gradient of increasing body N:P ratios: a crustacean, a caddisfly and a stonefly. The detritivores were placed in microcosms and submerged in a natural stream. Four contrasting leaf species were offered, both singly and in two-species mixtures, to...

Data from: Above-ground and below-ground responses to long-term nutrient addition across a retrogressive chronosequence

David A. Wardle, Micael Jonsson, Jordan R. Mayor & Daniel B. Metcalfe
1. There is much interest in understanding ecosystem responses to local-scale soil fertility variation, which has often been studied using retrogressive chronosequences that span thousands of years and show declining fertility and plant productivity over time. There have been few attempts to experimentally test how plant nutrient limitation changes during retrogression. 2. We studied a well-characterized system of 30 forested lake islands in northern Sweden that collectively represent a 5350-year post-fire retrogressive chronosequence, with fertility...

Data from: Genetic architecture and genomic patterns of gene flow between hybridizing species of Picea

Amanda De La Torre, Pär Ingvarsson & Sally N. Aitken
Hybrid zones provide an opportunity to study the effects of selection and gene flow in natural settings. We employed nuclear microsatellites (single sequence repeat (SSR)) and candidate gene single-nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs) to characterize the genetic architecture and patterns of interspecific gene flow in the Picea glauca × P. engelmannii hybrid zone across a broad latitudinal (40–60 degrees) and elevational (350–3500 m) range in western North America. Our results revealed a wide and complex hybrid...

Data from: Effects of elevation and nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization on plant defence compounds in subarctic tundra heath vegetation

Jonathan R. De Long, Maja K. Sundqvist, Michael J. Gundale, Reiner Giesler & David A. Wardle
1. Plant chemical and structural defence compounds are well known to impact upon herbivory of fresh leaves and influence decomposition rates after leaf senescence. A number of theories predict that alleviating nutrient limitation and reducing other environmental stressors will result in decreased production of plant chemical defences. 2. In this study, we measured plant defence properties [total polyphenols (TP), condensed tannins (CT) and lignin concentrations, and protein complexation capacity (PCC)] in both fresh and senesced...

Data from: Relative impacts of environmental variation and evolutionary history on the nestedness and modularity of tree-herbivore networks.

Kathryn M. Robinson, Céline Hauzy, Nicolas Loeuille & Benedicte R. Albrectsen
Nestedness and modularity are measures of ecological networks whose causative effects are little understood. We analyzed antagonistic plant–herbivore bipartite networks using common gardens in two contrasting environments comprised of aspen trees with differing evolutionary histories of defence against herbivores. These networks were tightly connected owing to a high level of specialization of arthropod herbivores that spend a large proportion of the life cycle on aspen. The gardens were separated by ten degrees of latitude with...

Data from: Environmental factors and traits that drive plant litter decomposition do not determine home-field advantage effects

Ciska G. F. Veen, Maja K. Sundqvist, David A. Wardle & G. F. Ciska Veen
The ‘home-field advantage’ (HFA) hypothesis predicts that plant litter is decomposed faster than expected underneath the plant from which it originates (‘home’) than underneath other plants (‘away’), because decomposer communities are specialized to break down litter from the plants they associate with. However, empirical evidence shows that the occurrence of HFA is highly variable, and the reasons for this are little understood. In our study we progress our understanding by investigating whether HFA is stronger...

Data from: Serendipitous meta-transcriptomics: the fungal community of Norway spruce (Picea abies)

Nicolas Delhomme, Görel Sundström, Neda Zamani, Henrik Lantz, Yao-Cheng Lin, Torgeir R. Hvidsten, Marc P. Höppner, Patric Jern, Yves Van De Peer, Joakim Lundeberg, Manfred G. Grabherr & Nathaniel R. Street
After performing de novo transcript assembly of >1 billion RNA-Sequencing reads obtained from 22 samples of different Norway spruce (Picea abies) tissues that were not surface sterilized, we found that assembled sequences captured a mix of plant, lichen, and fungal transcripts. The latter were likely expressed by endophytic and epiphytic symbionts, indicating that these organisms were present, alive, and metabolically active. Here, we show that these serendipitously sequenced transcripts need not be considered merely as...

Registration Year

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  • Umeå University
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  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
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  • University of Quebec at Montreal
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  • University of Eastern Finland
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