14 Works

Differential nutrient limitation and tree height control leaf physiology, supporting niche partitioning in tropical dipterocarp forests

David Bartholomew, Lindsay Banin, Paulo Bittencourt, Mohammed Aminur Bin Suis, Lina Mercado, Reuben Nilus, David Burslem & Lucy Rowland
Revealing the mechanisms of environmental niche partitioning within lowland tropical forests is important for understanding the drivers of current species distributions and potential vulnerability to environmental change. Tropical forest structure and species composition change across edaphic gradients in Borneo over short distances. However, our understanding of how edaphic conditions affect tree physiology and whether these relationships drive niche partitioning within Bornean forests remains incomplete. This study evaluated how leaf physiological function changes with nutrient availability...

The effects of water column dissolved oxygen concentrations on lake methane emissions: Results from a whole-lake oxygenation experiment

Gustav Pajala, Henrique Oliveira Sawakuchi, David Rudberg, Jonathan Schenk, Anna Sieczko, David Seekell, Ingrid Sundgren, Thanh Duc Nguyen, Karlsson Jan & David Bastviken
Lakes represent a major global source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Dissolved molecular oxygen (DO) in lakes inhibits production of CH4 and promotes CH4 oxidation. DO is therefore often considered an important regulator of CH4 emissions from lakes. Presence or absence of DO in the water overlying sediments can affect lake CH4 production and emissions in multiple ways, including the extent of CH4 production in the most reactive top sediment layer,...

Experimentally increased snow depth affects High Arctic microarthropods inconsistently over two consecutive winters

Eveline Krab, Erik Lundin, Stephen Coulson, Ellen Dorrepaal & Elisabeth Cooper
Climate change induced alterations to winter conditions may affect decomposer organisms controlling the vast carbon stores in northern soils. Soil microarthropods are abundant decomposers in Arctic ecosystems affecting soil carbon release through their activities. We studied whether increased snow depth affected microarthropods, and if effects were consistent over two consecutive winters. We sampled Collembola and soil mites from a snow accumulation experiment at Svalbard in early summer and used soil microclimatic data to explore to...

Temporal and spatial changes in benthic invertebrate trophic networks along a taxonomic richness gradient

Julie Garrison, Marie Nordström, Jan Albertsson & Francisco Nascimento
Species interactions underlie most ecosystem functions and are important for understanding ecosystem changes. Representing one type of species interaction, trophic networks were constructed from biodiversity monitoring data and known trophic links to assess how ecosystems have changed over time. The Baltic Sea is subject to many anthropogenic pressures, and low species diversity makes it an ideal candidate for determining how pressures change food webs. In this study, we used benthic monitoring data from 20 years...

Quantitative 3D OPT and LSFM datasets of pancreata from mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes: Dataset 2 & 3

Max Hahn, Christoffer Nord, Pim P. Van Krieken, Per-Olof Berggren, Erwin Ilegems, Abbas Cheddad & Ulf Ahlgren
Mouse models for streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes probably represent the most widely used systems for preclinical diabetes research, owing to the compound’s toxic effect on pancreatic ß-cells. However, a comprehensive view of pancreatic β-cell mass distribution subject to STZ administration is lacking. Previous assessments have largely relied on the extrapolation of stereological sections, which provide limited 3D-spatial and quantitative information. This data descriptor presents multiple ex vivo tomographic optical image data sets of the full...

Quantitative 3D OPT and LSFM datasets of pancreata from mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes: Dataset 1

Max Hahn, Christoffer Nord, Pim P. Van Krieken, Per-Olof Berggren, Erwin Ilegems, Abbas Cheddad & Ulf Ahlgren
Mouse models for streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes probably represent the most widely used systems for preclinical diabetes research, owing to the compound’s toxic effect on pancreatic ß-cells. However, a comprehensive view of pancreatic β-cell mass distribution subject to STZ administration is lacking. Previous assessments have largely relied on the extrapolation of stereological sections, which provide limited 3D-spatial and quantitative information. This data descriptor presents multiple ex vivo tomographic optical image data sets of the full...

Multiple drivers of large‐scale lichen decline in boreal forest canopies

Per-Anders Esseen, Magnus Ekström, Anton Grafström, Bengt Gunnar Jonsson, Kristin Palmqvist, Bertil Westerlund & Göran Ståhl
Thin, hair-like lichens (Alectoria, Bryoria, Usnea) form conspicuous epiphyte communities across the boreal biome. These poikilohydric organisms provide important ecosystem functions and are useful indicators of global change. We analyse how environmental drivers influence changes in occurrence and length of these lichens on Norway spruce (Picea abies) over 10 years in managed forests in Sweden using data from >6000 trees. Alectoria and Usnea showed strong declines in southern-central regions, whereas Bryoria declined in northern regions....

Environmental differences explain subtle yet detectable genetic structure in a widespread pollinator

Marcel Glück, Julia Geue & Henri Thomassen
BackgroundThe environment is a strong driver of genetic structure in many natural populations, yet often neglected in population genetic studies. This may be a particular problem in vagile species, where subtle structure cannot be explained by limitations to dispersal. Consequently, these species might falsely be considered quasi-panmictic and hence potentially mismanaged. A species this might apply to, is the buff-tailed bumble bee (Bombus terrestris), an economically important and widespread pollinator, which is considered to be...

Circum-Arctic distribution of chemical anti-herbivore compounds arctic shrubs

Elin Lindén, Mariska Te Beest, Ilka Abreu, Thomas Moritz, Maja Sundqvist, Isabel C Barrio, Julia Boike, John Bryant, Kari Anne Bråthen, Agata Buchwal, Guillermo Bueno, Alain Cuerrier, Dagmar Egelkraut, Bruce Forbes, Martin Hallinger, Monique Heijmans, Luise Hermanutz, David S Hik, Annika Hofgaard, Milena Holmgren, Diane C Huebner, Toke Hoye, Ingibjörg Jónsdóttir, Elina Kaarlejärvi, Emilie Kissler … & Johan Olofsson
Spatial variation in plant chemical defence towards herbivores can help us understand variation in herbivore top-down control of shrubs in the Arctic and possibly also shrub responses to global warming. Less defended, non-resinous shrubs could be more influenced by herbivores than more defended, resinous shrubs. However, sparse field measurements limit our current understanding of how much of the circum-Arctic variation in defence compounds is explained by taxa or defence functional groups (resinous/non-resinous). We measured circum-Arctic...

Quantitative 3D OPT and LSFM datasets of pancreata from mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes: Sample data sets

Max Hahn, Christoffer Nord, Pim P. Van Krieken, Per-Olof Berggren, Erwin Ilegems, Abbas Cheddad & Ulf Ahlgren
Mouse models for streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes probably represent the most widely used systems for preclinical diabetes research, owing to the compound’s toxic effect on pancreatic ß-cells. However, a comprehensive view of pancreatic β-cell mass distribution subject to STZ administration is lacking. Previous assessments have largely relied on the extrapolation of stereological sections, which provide limited 3D-spatial and quantitative information. This data descriptor presents multiple ex vivo tomographic optical image data sets of the full...

Rewetting prolongs root growing season in minerotrophic peatlands and mitigates negative drought effects

Sarah Schwieger, Sarah Schwieger, Juergen Kreyling, Bo Peters, Alexander Gillert, Uwe Freiherr Von Lukas, Gerald Jurasinski, Daniel Köhn & Gesche Blume-Werry
Root phenology influences the timing of plant resource acquisition and carbon fluxes into the soil. This is particularly important in fen peatlands, in which peat is primarily formed by roots and rhizomes of vascular plants. However, most fens in Central Europe are drained for agriculture, leading to large carbon losses, and further threatened by increasing frequency and intensity of droughts. Rewetting fens aims to restore the original carbon sink, but how root phenology is affected...

Data from: Network-based biostratigraphy for the late Permian to mid-Triassic Beaufort Group (Karoo Supergroup) in South Africa enhances biozone applicability and stratigraphic correlation

Pia A. Viglietti, Alexis Rojas, Martin Rosvall, Brady Klimes & Kenneth D. Angielczyk
The Permo-Triassic vertebrate assemblage zones (AZs) of South Africa’s Karoo Basin are a standard for local and global correlations. However, temporal, geographical, and methodological limitations challenge the AZs reliability. We analyze a unique fossil dataset comprising 1408 occurrences of 115 species grouped into 19 stratigraphic bin intervals from the Cistecephalus, Daptocephalus, Lystrosaurus declivis, and Cynognathus AZs. Using network science tools we compare six frameworks: Broom, Rubidge, Viglietti, Member, Formation, including a framework suggesting diachroneity of...

A genome-wide test for paternal indirect genetic effects on lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

Vinesh N Shenoi, Martin I Brengdahl, Jaime L Grace, Björn Eriksson, Patrik Rydén & Urban Friberg
Exposing sires to various environmental manipulations has demonstrated that paternal effects can be non-trivial also in species where male investment in offspring is almost exclusively limited to sperm. Whether paternal effects also have a genetic component (i.e. paternal indirect genetic effects - PIGEs) in such species is however largely unknown, primarily because of methodological difficulties separating indirect from direct effects of genes. PIGEs may nevertheless be important, since they have the capacity to contribute to...

Emerging stability of forest productivity by mixing two species buffers temperature destabilizing effect

Miren Del Rio, Ricardo Ruiz‐Peinado, Stig‐Olof Holm, Aris Jansons, Thomas Nord‐Larsen, Kris Verheyen, Andrés Bravo‐Oviedo, Hans Pretzsch, Ricardo Ruiz-Peinado, Hervé Jactel, Lluís Coll, Magnus Löf, Jorge Aldea, Christian Ammer, Admir Avdagić, Ignacio Barbeito, Kamil Bielak, Felipe Bravo, Gediminas Brazaitis, Jakub Cerný, Catherine Collet, Sonia Condés, Lars Drössler, Marek Fabrika, Michael Heym … & Andrés Bravo-Oviedo
The increasing disturbances in monocultures around the world are testimony to their instability under global change. Many studies have claimed that temporal stability of productivity increase with species richness, although the ecological fundaments have mainly been investigated through diversity experiments. To adequately manage forest ecosystems, it is necessary to have a comprehensive understanding of the effect of mixing species on the temporal stability of productivity and the way in which this it is influenced by...

Registration Year

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