6 Works

Data from: Changing landscapes of Southeast Asia and rodent-borne diseases: decreased diversity but increased transmission risks

Serge Morand, Kim Blasdell, Frédéric Bordes, Philippe Buchy, Bernard Carcy, Kittipong Chaisiri, Yannick Chaval, Julien Claude, Jean-François Cosson, Marc Desquesnes, Sathaporn Jittapalapong, Tawisa Jiyipong, Anamika Karnchanabanthoen, Pumhom Pornpan, Jean-Marc Rolain & Annelise Tran
The reduction in biodiversity through land use changes due to urbanization and agricultural intensification, appears linked to major epidemiological changes in many human diseases. Increasing disease risks and the emergence of novel pathogens appear to result from increased contact between wildlife, domesticated animals and humans. We investigate how increasing human domination of the environment may favor generalist and synanthropic rodent species and affect the diversity and prevalence of rodent-borne pathogens in Southeast Asia, a hotspot...

Data from: Genetic population structure and demography of an apex predator, the tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier

Agathe Pirog, Sebastien Jaquemet, Virginie Ravigné, Geremy Cliff, Eric Clua, Bonnie J. Holmes, Nigel E. Hussey, John E.G. Nevill, Andrew J. Temple, Per Berggren, Laurent Vigliola & Hélène Magalon
Population genetics have been increasingly applied to study large sharks over the last decade. Whilst large shark species are often difficult to study with direct methods, improved knowledge is needed for both population management and conservation, especially for species vulnerable to anthropogenic and climatic impacts. The tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, is an apex predator known to play important direct and indirect roles in tropical and sub-tropical marine ecosystems. While the global and Indo-West Pacific population...

Cocoa agroforest multifunctionality and soil fertility explained by shade tree litter traits

Marie Sauvadet, Stéphane Saj, Grégoire Freschet, Jean-Daniel Essobo, Séguy Enock, Thierry Becquer, Philippe Tixier & Jean-Michel Harmand
Manipulating plant functional diversity to improve agroecosystem multifunctionality is a central challenge of agricultural systems worldwide. In cocoa agroforestry systems (cAFS), shade trees are used to supply many services to farmers, yet their impact on soil functioning and cocoa yields is likely to vary substantially among tree species. Here, we compared the impact of five shade tree species (Canarium schweinfurthii (Canarium), Dacryoides edulis (Safou), Milicia excelsa (Iroko), Ceiba pentandra (Kapok tree), Albizia adianthifolia (Albizia)) and...

Data from: Using a multi-isotope approach to inform waterfowl movement in southern Africa

Gregory Mutumi, Graeme Cumming, Alexandre Caron, Mažeika Sullivan & Carlos Caceres
Many far-ranging species depend heavily on relatively small or temporary resources within a heterogeneous landscape. For waterfowl, most species rely on deep, permanent waterbodies as refugia from predators during annual flightless molt periods when synchronous loss and regrowth of the flight feathers occurs. The movements of ducks to and from molt sites are, however, poorly documented for most Afrotropical species and the dependencies of Afrotropical ducks on key sites are unclear, yet this information is...

Highlighting convergent evolution in morphological traits in response to climatic gradient in African tropical tree species: the case of genus Guibourtia Benn

Felicien Tosso, Jean-Louis Doucet, Kasso Daïnou, Adeline Fayolle, Alain Hambuckers, Charles Doumenge, Honoré Agbazahou, Piet Stoffelen & Olivier Hardy
Adaptive evolution is a major driver of organism diversification but the links between phenotypic traits and environmental niche remains little documented in tropical trees. Moreover, trait-niche relationships are complex because a correlation between the traits and environmental niches displayed by a sample of species may result from (1) convergent evolution if different environmental conditions have selected different sets of traits, and/or (2) phylogenetic inertia if niche and morphological differences between species are simply function of...

Data from: Evidence for high dispersal ability and mito-nuclear discordance in the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus

Jingtao Sun, Man-Man Wang, Yan-Kai Zhang, Marie-Pierre Chapuis, Xin-Yu Jiang, Gao Hu, Xian-Ming Yang, Cheng Ge, Xiao-Feng Xue & Xiao-Yue Hong
Understanding dispersal ability in pest species is critical for both theoretical aspects of evolutionary and population biology and from a practical standpoint, such as implementing effective forecasting systems. The small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén), is an economically important pest, but few data exist on its dispersal ability. Here, we used mitochondrial and nuclear markers to elucidate the population genetic structure of SBPH and of the parasitic bacterium Wolbachia throughout temperate and subtropical China....

Registration Year

  • 2019
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement
    6
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • University of Liège
    1
  • Laboratoire de Biotechnologie et Chimie Marines
    1
  • University of California, Merced
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • The Ohio State University
    1
  • PSL Research University
    1
  • University of Windsor
    1
  • Botanic Garden Meise
    1