57 Works

Soil thaw depth from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This datasets contains measures of soil thaw depth from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil thaw depth was measured in 2013 and 2014 in sites from Yukon and Northwest Territories.

Soil temperature profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of soil temperature profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil temperature profiles were monitored during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus, thawing features of peatland plateaus, unburnt and burnt black spruce forests, and additional sites.

Data from: Stabilising survival selection on pre-senescent expression of a sexual ornament followed by a terminal decline

Mirre Simons, Michael Briga, Simon Verhulst & M. J. P. Simons
Senescence is a decrease in functional capacity, increasing mortality rate with age. Sexual signals indicate functional capacity, because costs of ornamentation ensure signal honesty, and are therefore expected to senesce, tracking physiological deterioration and mortality. For sexual traits, mixed associations with age and positive associations with life expectancy have been reported. However, whether these associations are caused by selective disappearance and/or within-individual senescence of sexual signals, respectively, is not known. We previously reported that zebra...

Data from: Species-habitat relationships and ecological correlates of butterfly abundance in a transformed tropical landscape

Anuj Jain, Felix K. S. Lim & Edward L. Webb
Tropical butterfly conservation strategies often focus on total and/or common species richness to assess the conservation value of a patch or habitat. However, such a strategy overlooks the unique dynamics of rare species. We evaluated the species-habitat relationships of 209 common, intermediate, and rare butterfly species (including morphospecies) across four habitat types (mature, degraded, or fragmented forest, and urban parks) and two patch sizes (<400 ha, ≥400 ha) in Singapore. Common species richness was consistent...

Data from: Phylogeny and generic delimitation in Molluginaceae, new pigment data in Caryophyllales, and the new family Corbichoniaceae

Mats Thulin, Abigail J. Moore, Hesham El-Seedi, Anders Larsson, Pascal-Antoine Christin & Erika J. Edwards
The circumscription of Molluginaceae has changed radically in recent years, with Corbichonia being moved to Lophiocarpaceae, Limeum to Limeaceae, Macarthuria to Macarthuriaceae and all species of Hypertelis, except the type, to Kewa in Kewaceae. In a broad analysis of core Caryophyllales using plastid trnK-matK and rbcL sequences, the position of Molluginaceae in a strict sense as sister to the Portulacineae clade is corroborated, as are the positions of Corbichonia, Limeum and Kewa outside the family....

Autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration fluxes from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration fluxes from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration fluxes (CO2) were monitored during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus, unburnt and burnt black spruce forests, and additional sites.

Data from: Reframing the evidence base for policy-relevance to increase impact: a case study on forest fragmentation in the oil palm sector

Jennifer M. Lucey, Georgina Palmer, K. Loong Yeong, David P. Edwards, Michael J. M. Senior, Sarah A. Scriven, Glen Reynolds & Jane K. Hill
It is necessary to improve knowledge exchange between scientists and decision-makers so that scientific evidence can be readily accessed to inform policy. To maximise impact of scientific evidence in policy development, the scientific community should engage more fully with decision-makers, building long-term working relationships in order to identify and respond to ‘policy windows’ with science that is reframed for policy-relevance. We illustrate the process and challenges using a case study in which we synthesised evidence...

Data from: Genome divergence and diversification within a geographic mosaic of coevolution

Thomas L. Parchman, C. Alex Buerkle, Victor Soria-Carrasco & Craig W. Benkman
Despite substantial interest in coevolution's role in diversification, examples of coevolution contributing to speciation have been elusive. Here, we build upon past studies that have shown both coevolution between South Hills crossbills and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and high levels of reproductive isolation between South Hills crossbills and other ecotypes in the North American red crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) complex. We used genotyping by sequencing to generate population genomic data and applied phylogenetic and population genetic...

Data from: The impact of tropical forest logging and oil palm agriculture on the soil microbiome

Binu M. Tripathi, David P. Edwards, Lucas William Mendes, Mincheol Kim, Ke Dong, Hyoki Kim & Jonathan M. Adams
Selective logging and forest conversion to oil palm agriculture are rapidly altering tropical forests. However, functional responses of the soil microbiome to these land-use changes are poorly understood. Using 16S rRNA gene and shotgun metagenomic sequencing, we compared composition and functional attributes of soil biota between unlogged, once-logged and twice-logged rainforest, and areas converted to oil palm plantations in Sabah, Borneo. Although there was no significant effect of logging history, we found a significant difference...

Data from: Ecological speciation in sympatric palms: 2. pre- and post-zygotic isolation

H. Hipperson, L.T. Dunning, W.J. Baker, R.K. Butlin, I. Hutton, A.S.T. Papadopulos, C.M. Smadja, T.C. Wilson, C. Devaux, Vincent Savolainen, R. K. Butlin, T. C. Wilson, W. J. Baker & A. S. T. Papadopulos
We evaluated reproductive isolation in two species of palms (Howea) that have evolved sympatrically on Lord Howe Island (LHI, Australia). We estimated the strength of some pre- and post-zygotic mechanisms in maintaining current species boundaries. We found that flowering time displacement between species is consistent across in and ex situ common gardens and is thus partly genetically determined. On LHI, pre-zygotic isolation due solely to flowering displacement was 97% for H. belmoreana and 80% for...

Data from: Telomere length reveals cumulative individual and transgenerational inbreeding effects in a passerine bird

Kat Bebbington, Lewis G. Spurgin, Eleanor A. Fairfield, Hannah L. Dugdale, Jan Komdeur, Terry Burke & David S. Richardson
Inbreeding results in more homozygous offspring that should suffer reduced fitness, but it can be difficult to quantify these costs for several reasons. First, inbreeding depression may vary with ecological or physiological stress and only be detectable over long time periods. Second, parental homozygosity may indirectly affect offspring fitness, thus confounding analyses that consider offspring homozygosity alone. Finally, measurement of inbreeding coefficients, survival and reproductive success may often be too crude to detect inbreeding costs...

Data from: Winter territory prospecting is associated with life-history stage but not activity in a passerine

Alfredo Sánchez-Tójar, Isabel Winney, Antje Girndt, Mirre J.P. Simons, Shinichi Nakagawa, Terry Burke, Julia Schroeder & Mirre J. P. Simons
Finding a high quality territory is essential for many animals to reproduce successfully. Despite its importance for fitness, we know little about the process of territory prospecting in wild birds, and whether individual traits and behaviours, such as personality, co-vary with territory prospecting. Here, we use long-term data from a wild, insular house sparrow Passer domesticus population to test three hypotheses about territory fidelity and prospecting: (1) House sparrows show high territory fidelity between years...

Bulk density, carbon and nitrogen content in soil profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of measurements of bulk density, carbon and nitrogen content in soil profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil cores were sampled during early summer in 2013 and 2014. Soil cores were sampled from a peatland plateau and thawing features of the peatland plateau, and from an unburnt and burnt black spruce forest, and additional sites in Yukon and Northwest Territories.

Soil respired radiocarbon as CO2 and CH4 from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset contains measures of soil respired radiocarbon as CO2 and CH4 from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada. The radiocarbon content of soil respired CO2 and CH4 was measured during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus, thawing features of peatland plateaus and unburnt and burnt black spruce forests.

Data from: C4 photosynthesis boosts growth by altering physiology, allocation and size

Rebecca R. L. Atkinson, Emily J. Mockford, Christopher Bennett, Pascal-Antoine Christin, Elizabeth L. Spriggs, Robert P. Freckleton, Ken Thompson, Mark Rees & Colin P. Osborne
C4 photosynthesis is a complex set of leaf anatomical and biochemical adaptations that have evolved more than 60 times to boost carbon uptake compared with the ancestral C3 photosynthetic type1,​2,​3. Although C4 photosynthesis has the potential to drive faster growth rates4,5, experiments directly comparing C3 and C4 plants have not shown consistent effects1,6,7. This is problematic because differential growth is a crucial element of ecological theory8,9 explaining C4 savannah responses to global change10,11, and research...

Data from: Early-life disease exposure and associations with adult survival, cause of death, and reproductive success in preindustrial humans

Adam Hayward, Francesca L. Rigby & Virpi Lummaa
A leading hypothesis proposes that increased human life span since 1850 has resulted from decreased exposure to childhood infections, which has reduced chronic inflammation and later-life mortality rates, particularly from cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cancer. Early-life cohort mortality rate often predicts later-life survival in humans, but such associations could arise from factors other than disease exposure. Additionally, the impact of early-life disease exposure on reproduction remains unknown, and thus previous work ignores a major component...

Data from: How big is it really? Assessing the efficacy of indirect estimates of body size in Asian elephants

Simon N. Chapman, Hannah S. Mumby, Jennie A.H. Crawley, Khyne U. Mar, Win Htut, Aung Thura Soe, Htoo Htoo Aung, Virpi Lummaa & Jennie A. H. Crawley
Information on an organism’s body size is pivotal in understanding its life history and fitness, as well as helping inform conservation measures. However, for many species, particularly large-bodied wild animals, taking accurate body size measurements can be a challenge. Various means to estimate body size have been employed, from more direct methods such as using photogrammetry to obtain height or length measurements, to indirect prediction of weight using other body morphometrics or even the size...

Data from: Effects of landscape configuration and composition on phylogenetic diversity of trees in a highly fragmented tropical forest

Fabio Antonio R. Matos, Luiz Fernando S. Magnago, Markus Gastauer, João M. B. Carreiras, Marcelo Simonelli, João Augusto A. Meira-Neto & David P. Edwards
Fragmentation of tropical forests is a major driver of the global extinction crisis. A key question is understanding how fragmentation impacts phylogenetic diversity, which summarizes the total evolutionary history shared across species within a community. Conserving phylogenetic diversity decreases the potential of losing unique ecological and phenotypic traits and plays important roles in maintaining ecosystem function and stability. Our study was conducted in landscapes within the highly fragmented Brazilian Atlantic forest. We sampled living trees...

Data from: Targeted resequencing reveals geographical patterns of differentiation for loci implicated in parallel evolution

Anja M. Westram, Marina Panova, Juan Galindo & Roger K. Butlin
Parallel divergence and speciation provide evidence for the role of divergent selection in generating biological diversity. Recent studies indicate that parallel phenotypic divergence may not have the same genetic basis in different geographical locations - “outlier loci” (loci potentially affected by divergent selection) are often not shared among parallel instances of phenotypic divergence. However, limited sharing may be due, in part, to technical issues if false positive outliers occur. Here, we test this idea in...

Data from: A demographic ménage à trois: interactions between disturbances both amplify and dampen population dynamics of an endemic plant

Matthew R. Tye, Eric S. Menges, Carl Weekley, Pedro F. Quintana-Ascencio, Roberto Salguero-Gómez & Matthew Tye
Natural and anthropogenic disturbances co-occur in most systems, but how they interact to shape demographic outcomes remains poorly understood. Such interactions may alter dynamics of populations in non-additive ways, making demographic predictions challenging when focusing on only one disturbance. Thus, understanding the interactive effects of such disturbances is critically important to determine the population viability of most species under a diversity of stressors. We used a hierarchical integral projection model (IPM), parameterized with 13 years...

Data from: Genome-wide differentiation in closely related populations: the roles of selection and geographic isolation

Rebecca J. Safran, Elizabeth S. C. Scordato, Matthew R. Wilkins, Joanna K. Hubbard, Brittany R. Jenkins, Tomas Albrecht, Samuel M. Flaxman, Hakan Karaardic, Yoni Vortman, Arnon Lotem, Patrik Nosil, Péter Pap, Sheng-Feng Shen, Shih-Fan Chan, Thomas L. Parchman, Nolan C. Kane, S.-F. Chan & T.L. Parchman
Population divergence in geographic isolation is due to a combination of factors. Natural and sexual selection may be important in shaping patterns of population differentiation, a pattern referred to as ‘isolation by adaptation’ (IBA). IBA can be complementary to the well-known pattern of ‘isolation by distance’ (IBD), in which the divergence of closely related populations (via any evolutionary process) is associated with geographic isolation. The barn swallow Hirundo rustica complex comprises six closely related subspecies,...

Data from: Homeostasis of metabolites in Escherichia coli on transition from anaerobic to aerobic conditions and the transient secretion of pyruvate

Nur Adeela Yasid, Matthew D. Rolfe, Jeffrey Green & Mike P. Williamson
We have developed a method for rapid quenching of samples taken from chemostat cultures of Escherichia coli that gives reproducible and reliable measurements of extracellular and intracellular metabolites by 1H NMR and have applied it to study the major central metabolites during the transition from anaerobic to aerobic growth. Almost all metabolites showed a gradual change after perturbation with air, consistent with immediate inhibition of pyruvate formate-lyase, dilution of overflow metabolites and induction of aerobic...

Data from: Experimental evidence of genome-wide impact of ecological selection during early stages of speciation-with-gene-flow

Scott P. Egan, Gregory J. Ragland, Lauren Assour, Thomas H. Q. Powell, Glen R. Hood, Scott Emrich, Patrik Nosil, Jeffrey L. Feder & Thomas H.Q. Powell
Theory predicts that speciation-with-gene-flow is more likely when the consequences of selection for population divergence transitions from mainly direct effects of selection acting on individual genes to a collective property of all selected genes in the genome. Thus, understanding the direct impacts of ecologically based selection, as well as the indirect effects due to correlations among loci, is critical to understanding speciation. Here, we measure the genome-wide impacts of host-associated selection between hawthorn and apple...

Data from: Is the Danube crested newt Triturus dobrogicus polytypic? A review and new nuclear DNA data

Ben Wielstra, Judit Vörös & Jan W. Arntzen
The Danube crested newt Triturus dobrogicus has been proposed to comprise two subspecies: T. d. dobrogicus and T. d. macrosoma. Uncertainty exists in the literature over their distribution and diagnosability. We conduct a multilocus phylogeographical survey and review published data to determine whether a two taxon treatment is warranted. Newly produced and published nuclear DNA data suggest intraspecific variation in the Pannonian Plain part of the range, but with extensive genetic admixture, whereas mitochondrial DNA...

Data from: Tissue culture as a source of replicates in non-model plants: variation in cold response in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea

Tanaka Kenta, Jessica E. M. Edwards, Roger K. Butlin, Terry Burke, W. Paul Quick, Peter Urwin & Matthew P. Davey
Whilst genotype-environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates-a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could potentially be overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and "somaclonal" variation. Here we examined the somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of the photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm' and ΦPSII, representing...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    57

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    57

Affiliations

  • University of Sheffield
    57
  • University of Edinburgh
    12
  • University of Exeter
    12
  • University of Sussex
    11
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    3
  • University of Gothenburg
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Rice University
    2
  • University of Notre Dame
    2
  • University of Queensland
    2