103 Works

Data from: Phenology of Drosophila species across a temperate growing season and implications for behavior

J.M. Gleason, Paula R. Roy, Elizabeth R. Everman, Terry C. Gleason & Theodore J. Morgan
Drosophila community composition is complex in temperate regions with different abundance of flies and species across the growing season. Monitoring Drosophila populations provides insights into the phenology of both native and invasive species. Over a single growing season, we collected Drosophila at regular intervals and determined the number of individuals of the nine species we found in Kansas, USA. Species varied in their presence and abundance through the growing season with peak diversity occurring after...

Data from: Spatial and successional dynamics of microbial biofilm communities in a grassland stream ecosystem

Allison M. Veach, James C. Stegen, Shawn P. Brown, Walter K. Dodds & Ari Jumpponen
Biofilms represent a metabolically active and structurally complex component of freshwater ecosystems. Ephemeral prairie streams are hydrologically harsh and prone to frequent perturbation. Elucidating both functional and structural community changes over time within prairie streams provides a general understanding of microbial responses to environmental disturbance. We examined microbial succession of biofilm communities at three sites in a third-order stream at Konza Prairie over a 2- to 64-day period. Microbial abundance (bacterial abundance, chlorophyll a concentrations)...

Data from: Process-based simulation of prairie growth

Cody J. Zilverberg, Jimmy Williams, Curtis Jones, Keith Harmoney, Jay Angerer, Loretta J. Metz & William Fox
When field research is cost- or time-prohibitive, models can inform decision-makers regarding the impact of agricultural policy on production and the environment, but process-based models that simulate animal-plant-soil interaction and ecosystem services in grazing lands are rare. In the U.S.A., APEX (Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender) is a model commonly used to inform policy on cropland, but its ability to simulate grazinglands was less robust. Therefore, we enhanced the APEX model’s plant growth module to improve its...

Data from: Comparative transcriptome and lipidome analyses reveal molecular chilling responses in chilling-tolerant sorghums

Sandeep R. Marla, Sunitha Shiva, Ruth Welti, Sanzhen Liu, John J. Burke & Geoffrey P. Morris
Chilling temperatures (0 to 15°C) are a major constraint for temperate cultivation of tropical-origin crops, including the cereal crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench). Northern Chinese sorghums have adapted to early-season chilling, but molecular mechanisms of chilling tolerance are unknown. We used RNA sequencing of seedlings to compare the chilling-responsive transcriptomes of a chilling-tolerant Chinese accession with a chilling-sensitive US reference line, and mass spectrometry to compare chilling-responsive lipidomes of four chilling-tolerant Chinese accessions with...

CIMMYT bread wheat breeding lines

Sandesh Shrestha, Jesse Poland, Susanne Dreisigacker, Shuangye Wu, Ravi Prakash Singh, Suchismita Mondal, Philomin Juliana, Jose Crossa & Mark Lucas
A total of 74,403 bread wheat breeding lines from the year 2013-2020 developed by the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) was genotyped. We used genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) to construct 433 GBS libraries which were sequenced in the Illumina platform to generate 440 FASTQ files. The key file consists of metadata such as sample name, flowcell, lane number, and barcode used for multiplexing samples. The FASTQ file of corresponding samples can be identified based on...

Assessing corrosion resistance of 2D nanomaterial-based coatings on stainless steel substrates

Shakir Bin Mujib, Santanu Mukherjee, Zongkan Ren & Gurpreet Singh
Two dimensional (2D) materials have elicited considerable interest in the past decade due to a diverse array of novel properties ranging from high surface to mass ratios, a wide range of band gaps (insulating boron nitride to semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides), high mechanical strength and chemical stability. Given the superior chemo-thermo-mechanical properties, 2D materials may provide transformative solution to a familiar yet persistent problem of significant socio-economic burden: the corrosion of stainless steel (SS). With...

Data from: Lineage and latitudinal variation in Phragmites australis tolerance to herbivory: implications for invasion success

Jordan Croy, Laura Meyerson, Warwick Allen, Ganesh Bhattarai & James T. Cronin
Herbivores play a critical role in plant invasions either by facilitating or inhibiting species establishment and spread. However, relatively few studies with invasive plant species have focused on the role of plant tolerance and how it varies geographically to influence invasion success. We conducted a common garden study using two lineages (native and invasive) of the grass Phragmites australis that are prevalent in North American wetlands. Using 31 populations collected across a broad geographic range,...

Influences of patch-burn grazing on headwater prairie streams and subsequent recovery

Jessica Fulgoni, Matt Whiles, Walter Dodds, Danelle Larson, Karen Jackson & Bartosz Grudzinski
1. Patch-burn grazing (PBG) can promote terrestrial heterogeneity and biodiversity, but can temporarily increase stream nutrients, ecosystem metabolism, and alter macroinvertebrate assemblages. The impacts of grazing on stream channel morphology and post-PBG recovery patterns are unclear. 2. We assessed the influence of grazing in PBG managed grassland streams in Missouri, USA, and subsequent recovery when grazing ceased for two years. We hypothesized that grazing would degrade water quality, stream biotic integrity, and channel morphology, but...

Development of whole-genome prediction models to increase the rate of genetic gain in intermediate wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium) breeding

Jared Crain, Atena Haghighattalab, Lee DeHaan & Jesse Poland
The development of perennial grain crops is driven by the vision of simultaneous food production and enhanced ecosystem services. Typically, perennial crops like intermediate wheatgrass (IWG, Thinopyrum intermedium) have low seed yield and other detrimental agronomic traits. Next generation sequencing has made genomic selection (GS) a tractable and viable breeding method. To investigate how an IWG breeding program may utilize GS, we evaluated 3,658 plants over two years for 46 traits to build a training...

A high-throughput skim-sequencing approach for genotyping, dosage estimation and identifying translocations

Laxman Adhikari, Jesse Poland, Sandesh Shrestha, Shuanyge Wu, Jared Crain, Lianglian Gao, Byron Evers, Duane Wilson, Yoonha Ju, Dal-Hoe Koo, Pierre Hulc, Curtis Pozniak, Sean Walkowiak, Xiaoyun Wang, Jing Wu, Jeffrey Glaubitz, Lee DeHaan & Bernd Friebe
An optimized, high-throughput and cost-effective genotyping method applicable to various crop breeding populations is very important in this genomic era. We have developed an optimized Nextera skim-sequencing (skim-seq) approach to genotype different populations that can be used for genetics studies and genomics-assisted breeding. We performed skim-seq on a variety of populations developed through doubled haploid (DH) technology, inter-specific recombinants developed through introgression, amphidiploid developed through wide crosses, and on known monosomic samples. 1. A doubled...

Data from: Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster.

Caroline Margaret Williams, Miki Watanabe, Mario R. Guarracino, Maria Brigida Ferraro, Arthur S. Edison, Theodore J. Morgan, Arezue F. B. Boroujerdi, Dan A. Hahn & Daniel A. Hahn
When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it...

Data from: Ecological mismatches are moderated by local conditions in two populations of a long-distance migratory bird

Nathan Senner, Maria Stager, Brett K. Sandercock & Nathan R. Senner
Ecological mismatches between reproductive events and seasonal resource peaks are frequently proposed to be a key driver of population dynamics resulting from global climate change. Many local populations are experiencing reduced reproductive success as a consequence of mismatches, but few mismatches have led to species-level population declines. To better understand this apparent paradox, we investigated the breeding phenology and chick survival of two disjunct populations of Hudsonian godwits Limosa haemastica breeding at Churchill, Manitoba and...

Data from: Environmental heterogeneity has a weak effect on diversity during community assembly in tallgrass prairie

Sara G. Baer, John M. Blair & Scott L. Collins
Understanding what constrains the persistence of species in communities is at the heart of community assembly theory and its application to conserving and enhancing biodiversity. The “environmental heterogeneity hypothesis” predicts greater species coexistence in habitats with greater resource variability. In the context of community assembly, environmental heterogeneity may influence the variety and strength of abiotic conditions and competitive interactions (environmental filters) to affect the relative abundance of species and biodiversity. We manipulated key resources that...

Data from: Environmental heterogeneity generates opposite gene-by-environment interactions for two fitness-related traits within a population

Zachary Wyatt Culumber, Molly Schumer, Scott Monks & Michael Tobler
Theory predicts that environmental heterogeneity offers a potential solution to the maintenance of genetic variation within populations, but empirical evidence remains sparse. The livebearing fish Xiphophorus variatus exhibits polymorphism at a single locus, with different alleles resulting in up to five distinct melanistic “tailspot” patterns within populations. We investigated the effects of heterogeneity in two ubiquitous environmental variables (temperature and food availability) on two fitness-related traits (upper thermal limits and body condition) in two different...

Functional consequences of phenotypic variation between locally adapted populations: swimming performance and ventilation in extremophile fish

Michael Tobler, Lenin Arias-Rodriguez & Henry Camarillo
Natural selection drives the evolution of traits to optimize organismal performance, but optimization of one aspect of performance can often influence other aspects of performance. Here, we asked how phenotypic variation between locally adapted fish populations affects locomotion and ventilation, testing for functional trade-offs and trait-performance correlations. Specifically, we investigated two populations of livebearing fish (Poecilia mexicana) that inhabit distinct habitat types (hydrogen-sulfide-rich springs and adjacent nonsulfidic streams). For each individual, we quantified different metrics...

The sunflower (Helianthus annuusL.) genome reflects a recent history of biased accumulation of transposable elements

S. Evan Staton, Bradley H. Bakken, Benjamin K. Blackman, Mark A. Chapman, Nolan C. Kane, Shunxue Tang, Mark C. Ungerer, Steven J. Knapp, Loren H. Rieseberg & John M. Burke
Aside from polyploidy, transposable elements are the major drivers of genome size increases in plants. Thus, understanding the diversity and evolutionary dynamics of transposable elements in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), especially given its large genome size (∼3.5 Gb) and the well‐documented cases of amplification of certain transposons within the genus, is of considerable importance for understanding the evolutionary history of this emerging model species. By analyzing approximately 25% of the sunflower genome from random sequence...

Data on universities offering undergraduate degrees that train students for soil science careers at universities in the USA and its territories

Eric C. Brevik, Holly Dolliver, Susan Edinger-Marshall, Danny Itkin, Jodi Johnson-Maynard, Garrett Liles, Monday Mbila, Colby Moorberg, Yaniria Sanchez-De Leon, Joshua J. Steffan, April Ulery & Karen Vaughan
Several soil science education studies over the last 15 years have focused on the number of students enrolled in soil science programs. However, no studies have quantitatively addressed the number of undergraduate soil science preparatory programs that exist in the United States, which means we do not have solid data concerning whether overall program numbers are declining, rising, or holding steady. This also means we do not have complete data on the same trends for...

Assembly of Aegilops comosa chromosomes

Mahmoud Said, Kateřina Holušová, András Farkas, László Ivanizs, Eszter Gaál, Petr Cápal, Michael Abrouk, Mihaela Martis-Thiele, Balázs Kalapos, Jan Bartoš, Bernd Friebe, Jaroslav Doležel & István Molnár
We sequenced and assembled seven chromosomes of Aegilops comosa. The assembly with Meraculous resulted in ~ 50k - 186k scaffolds per chromosome with N50 size 6.4kb - 20.2kb. The scaffold sequences were used for development of molecular markers specific for cDNAs sequences mapped on Ae. comosa chromosomes Pairwise alignment of wheat cDNA-sequences and the chromosomal scaffolds of Ae. comosa identified candidate sequences. In order to analyze the structure and homeology of Aegilops chromosomes, forty-three mapped...

Pathogen genetic control of transcriptome variation in the Arabidopsis thaliana – Botrytis cinerea pathosystem

Nicole Soltis, Celine Caseys, Wei Zhang, Jason Corwin, Susanna Atwell & Daniel Kliebenstein
In plant-pathogen relations, disease symptoms arise from the interaction of the host and pathogen genomes. Host-pathogen functional gene interactions are well described while little is known about how the pathogen genetic variation modulates both organisms’ transcriptomes. To model and generate hypotheses on a generalist pathogen control of gene expression regulation, we used the Botrytis cinerea - Arabidopsis thaliana pathosystem and the genetic diversity of a collection of 96 B. cinerea isolates. We performed expression-based genome-wide...

Data from: Fluctuating, warm temperatures decrease the effect of a key floral repressor on flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana

Liana T. Burghardt, Daniel E. Runcie, Amity M. Wilczek, Martha D. Cooper, Judith L. Roe, Stephen M. Welch & Johanna Schmitt
The genetic basis of growth and development is often studied in constant laboratory environments; however, the environmental conditions that organisms experience in nature are often much more dynamic. We examined how daily temperature fluctuations, average temperature, day length and vernalization influence the flowering time of 59 genotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana with allelic perturbations known to affect flowering time. For a subset of genotypes, we also assessed treatment effects on morphology and growth. We identified 17...

Data from: Extremophile Poeciliidae: multivariate insights into the complexity of speciation along replicated ecological gradients

Rüdiger Riesch, Michael Tobler, Hannes Lerp, Jonas Jourdan, Tess Doumas, Patrik Nosil, R. Brian Langerhans & Martin Plath
Background: Replicate population pairs that diverge in response to similar selective regimes allow for an investigation of (a) whether phenotypic traits diverge in a similar and predictable fashion, (b) whether there is gradual variation in phenotypic divergence reflecting variation in the strength of natural selection among populations, (c) whether the extent of this divergence is correlated between multiple character suites (i.e., concerted evolution), and (d) whether gradual variation in phenotypic divergence predicts the degree of...

Data from: Diversification of R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the tomato family Solanaceae

Daniel J. Gates, Susan R. Strickler, Lukas A. Mueller, Bradley J. S. C. Olson & Stacey D. Smith
MYB transcription factors play an important role in regulating key plant developmental processes involving defense, cell shape, pigmentation, and root formation. Within this gene family, sequences containing an R2R3 MYB domain are the most abundant type and exhibit a wide diversity of functions. In this study, we identify 559 R2R3 MYB genes using whole genome data from four species of Solanaceae and reconstruct their evolutionary relationships. We compare the Solanaceae R2R3 MYBs to the well-characterized...

Data from: Population genomic variation reveals roles of history, adaptation, and ploidy in switchgrass

Paul P. Grabowski, Geoffrey P. Morris, Michael D. Casler & Justin O. Borevitz
Geographic patterns of genetic variation are shaped by multiple evolutionary processes, including genetic drift, migration, and natural selection. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) has strong genetic and adaptive differentiation despite life history characteristics that promote high levels of gene flow and can homogenize intraspecific differences, such as wind-pollination and self-incompatibility. To better understand how historical and contemporary factors shape variation in switchgrass, we use genotyping-by-sequencing to characterize switchgrass from across its range at 98,042 SNPs. Population...

Data from: Bias correction of bounded location errors in presence-only data

Trevor J. Hefley, Brian M. Brost & Mevin B. Hooten
1. Location error occurs when the true location is different than the reported location. Because habitat characteristics at the true location may be different than those at the reported location, ignoring location error may lead to unreliable inference concerning species-habitat relationships. 2. We explain how a transformation known in the spatial statistics literature as a change of support (COS) can be used to correct for location errors when the true locations are points with unknown...

Data from: Centennial-scale reductions in nitrogen availability in temperate forests of the United States

K. K. McLauchlan, L. M. Gerhart, J. J. Battles, J. M. Craine, A. J. Elmore, P. E. Higuera, M. C. Mack, B. E. McNeil, D. M. Nelson, N. Pederson & S. S. Perakis
Forests cover 30% of the terrestrial Earth surface and are a major component of the global carbon (C) cycle. Humans have doubled the amount of global reactive nitrogen (N), increasing deposition of N onto forests worldwide. However, other global changes—especially climate change and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations—are increasing demand for N, the element limiting primary productivity in temperate forests, which could be reducing N availability. To determine the long-term, integrated effects of global changes...

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