115 Works

Data from: Population genomics of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.): comparative analysis of global accessions and Senegalese landraces

Zhenbin Hu, Bassirou Mbacké, Ramasamy Perumal, Mame Codou Guèye, Ousmane Sy, Sophie Bouchet, P. V. Vara Prasad & Geoffrey P. Morris
Background: Pearl millet is a staple food for people in arid and semi-arid regions of Africa and South Asia due to its high drought tolerance and nutritional qualities. A better understanding of the genomic diversity and population structure of pearl millet germplasm is needed to support germplasm conservation and genetic improvement of this crop. Here we characterized two pearl millet diversity panels, (i) a set of global accessions from Africa, Asia, and the America, and...

Data from: Barcoding the kingdom Plantae: new PCR primers for ITS regions of plants with improved universality and specificity

Tao Cheng, Chao Xu, Li Lei, Changhao Li, Yu Zhang & Shiliang Zhou
The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA is one of the most commonly used DNA markers in plant phylogenetic and DNA barcoding analyses, and it has been recommended as a core plant DNA barcode. Despite this popularity, the universality and specificity of PCR primers for the ITS region are not satisfactory, resulting in amplification and sequencing difficulties. By thoroughly surveying and analysing the 18S, 5.8S and 26S sequences of Plantae and Fungi from...

Data from: Ongoing changes in the avifauna of La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica: twenty-three years of Christmas Bird Counts

W. Alice Boyle & Bryan J. Sigel
Tropical forest fragmentation influences community composition via differential species-level effects. Avian responses to fragmentation at La Selva Biological Station are, in part, responsible for the particular concern over the fate of understory insectivorous species. However, since the 1990s, much previously deforested land within and surrounding La Selva has reverted to forest, providing an opportunity to test hypotheses explaining ongoing avifaunal change. Analyses of 23 years (1989–2011) of Christmas Bird Counts reveal that 63 of 202...

Data from: Phylogeography and species delimitation in convict cichlids (Cichlidae: Amatitlania): implications for taxonomy and Plio–Pleistocene evolutionary history in Central America

Justin C. Bagley, Wilfredo A. Matamoros, Caleb D. McMahan, Michael Tobler, Prosanta Chakrabarty & Jerald B. Johnson
We investigate phylogeographic patterns and delimit species boundaries within Amatitlania, a genus of Central American cichlid fishes. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences from 318 individuals spanning the geographical ranges of all three currently recognized Amatitlania species strongly supported one major clade, with a relatively diverged subclade corresponding to A. kanna samples from eastern Costa Rica and Panama. Gene trees and networks revealed marked incongruences between phylogeographic structure and morpho-species taxonomy as a result of...

Data from: Divergence of the diapause transcriptome in apple maggot flies: winter regulation and post-winter transcriptional repression

Peter J. Meyers, Thomas H. Q. Powell, Kimberly K. O. Walden, Adam Shieferecke, Jeffrey L. Feder, Daniel A. Hahn, Hugh M. Robertson, Stewart H. Berlocher & Gregory J. Ragland
Duration of dormancy regulates seasonal timing in many organisms and may be modulated by day length and temperature. Though photoperiodic modulation has been well studied, temperature modulation of dormancy has received less attention. Here, we leverage genetic variation in diapause in the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, to test whether gene expression during winter or following spring warming regulates diapause duration. We used RNAseq to compare transcript abundance during and after simulated winter between an...

Data from: Investigating behavioral drivers of seasonal Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia Coli (STEC) patterns in grazing cattle using an agent-based model

Daniel E. Dawson, Jocelyn H. Keung, Monica G. Napoles, Michael R. Vella, Shi Chen, Mike Sanderson, Cristina Lanzas & Michael W. Sanderson
The causes of seasonal variability in pathogen transmission are not well understood, and have not been comprehensively investigated. In an example for enteric pathogens, incidence of Escherichia coli O157 (STEC) colonization in cattle is consistently higher during warmer months compared to cooler months in various cattle production systems. However, actual mechanisms for this seasonality remain elusive. In addition, the influence of host (cattle) behavior on this pattern has not been thoroughly considered. To that end,...

Data from: Prophylactic digoxin treatment reduces IL-17 production in vivo in the neonatal calf and moderates RSV-associated disease

Jodi L. McGill, Mariana Guerra-Maupome & Sarah Schneider
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in human infants. Bovine RSV infection of neonatal calves is pathologically and immunologically similar to RSV infection in infants, and is therefore a useful preclinical model for testing novel therapeutics. Treatment of severe RSV bronchiolitis relies on supportive care and may include use of bronchodilators and inhaled or systemic corticosteroids. Interleukin-17A (IL-17) is an inflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in neutrophil...

Data from: Population genomics of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) across diverse agroclimatic zones of Niger

Fanna Maina, Sophie Bouchet, Sandeep R. Marla, Zhenbin Hu, Jianan Wang, Aissata Mamadou, Magagi Abdou, Abdoul-Aziz Saïdou & Geoffrey Preston Morris
Improving adaptation of staple crops in developing countries is important to ensure food security. In the West African country of Niger, the staple crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) is cultivated across diverse agroclimatic zones, but the genetic basis of local adaptation has not been described. The objectives of this study were to characterize the genomic diversity of sorghum from Niger and to identify genomic regions conferring local adaptation to agroclimatic zones and farmer preferences. We analyzed...

Data from: Drivers of nocturnal water flux in a tallgrass prairie

Kimberly O'Keefe & Jesse B. Nippert
1. Nocturnal transpiration can impact water balance from the local community to earth-atmosphere fluxes. However, the dynamics and drivers of nocturnal transpiration among coexisting plant functional groups in herbaceous ecosystems are unknown. 2. Here, we addressed the following questions: (1) How do nocturnal (Enight) and diurnal (Eday) transpiration vary among coexisting grasses, forbs, and shrubs in a tallgrass prairie? (2) What environmental variables drive Enight and do these differ from the drivers of Eday? (3)...

Data from: Adaptive genetic potential and plasticity of trait variation in the foundation prairie grass Andropogon gerardii across the US Great Plains’ climate gradient: Implications for climate change and restoration

Loretta C. Johnson, Matthew Galliart, Sofia Sabates, Hannah Tetreault, Angel DeLaCruz, Johnny Bryant, Jacob Alsdurf, Mary Knapp, Nora Bello, Sara Baer, Brian Maricle, David Gibson, Jesse Poland, Paul St. Amand, Natalie Unruh, Olivia Parrish & Loretta Johnson
Plant response to climate depends on a species’ adaptive potential. To address this, we used reciprocal gardens to detect genetic and environmental plasticity effects on phenotypic variation and combined with genetic analyses. Four reciprocal garden sites were planted with three regional ecotypes of Andropogon gerardii, a dominant Great Plains prairie grass, using dry, mesic, wet ecotypes originating from western KS to Illinois that span 500 to 1,200 mm rainfall year-1. We aimed to answer: (1)...

Mass ratio effects underlie ecosystem responses to environmental change

Melinda Smith, Sally Koerner, Alan Knapp, Meghan Avolio, Francis Chaves, Elsie Denton, John Dietrich, David Gibson, Jesse Gray, Ava Hoffman, David Hoover, Kimberly Komatsu, Andrea Silletti, Kevin Wilcox, Qiang Yu & John Blair
1. Random species loss has been shown experimentally to reduce ecosystem function, sometimes more than other anthropogenic environmental changes. Yet, controversy surrounds the importance of this finding for natural systems where species loss is non-random. 2. We compiled data from 16 multi-year experiments located at a single site in native tallgrass prairie. These experiments included responses to 11 anthropogenic environmental changes, as well as non-random biodiversity loss - either the removal of uncommon/rare plant species...

Frequent burning causes large losses of carbon from deep soil layers in a temperate savanna

Adam Francis Pellegrini, Kendra K. McLauchlan, Sarah E. Hobbie, Michelle C. Mack, Abbey L. Marcotte, David M. Nelson, Steven Perakis, Peter B. Reich & Kyle Whittinghill
1. Fire activity is changing dramatically across the globe, with uncertain effects on ecosystem processes, especially belowground. Fire‐driven losses of soil carbon (C) are often assumed to occur primarily in the upper soil layers because the repeated combustion of aboveground biomass limits organic matter inputs into surface soil. However, C losses from deeper soil may occur if frequent burning reduces root biomass inputs of C into deep soil layers or stimulates losses of C via...

Metadata of literature survey of common gardens

Loretta Johnson
1. Local adaptation is a fundamental phenomenon in evolutionary biology, with relevance for formation of ecotypes, and ultimately new species, and application to restoration and species’ response to climate change. Reciprocal transplants, a common garden in which ecotypes are planted among home and away habitats, is the gold standard to detect local adaptation in populations. 2. This review focuses on reciprocal gardens to detect local adaptation, especially in grassland species beginning with early seminal studies...

Data from: Accuracy in the prediction of disease epidemics when ensembling simple but highly correlated models

Denis Shah, Erick De Wolf, Pierce Paul & Laurence Madden
Ensembling combines the predictions made by individual component base models with the goal of achieving a predictive accuracy that is better than that of any one of the constituent member models. Diversity among the base models in terms of predictions is a crucial criterion in ensembling. However, there are practical instances when the available base models produce highly correlated predictions, because they may have been developed within the same research group or may have been...

Do fine-scale experiments underestimate predator consumption rates?

Lindsey Bruckerhoff, Casey Pennock & Keith Gido
Understanding ecological processes across spatial scales helps link observations and predictions from experiments to ecological patterns occurring at coarser scales relevant to management and conservation. Using fish, we experimentally manipulated the size of arenas to test the spatial scaling of predator-prey interactions. We measured variation in predator consumption and prey behavior (prey aggregation, spatial overlap with predators, and movement) across arena sizes. Variation in prey behavior across arena sizes was hypothesized to drive consumption patterns...

Dancing drives evolution of sexual size dimorphism in manakins

Elsie H. Shogren, Marina Anciães, Julia Barske, César Cestari, Emily H. DuVal, Milene G. Gaiotti, Erik I. Johnson, Rebecca T. Kimball, Miguel A. Marini, T. Brandt Ryder, Micah N. Scholer, Judit Ungvári, Stewart A. White & W. Alice Boyle
Body size mediates life history, physiology, and inter- and intra-specific interactions. Within species, sexes frequently differ in size, reflecting divergent selective pressures and/or constraints. Both sexual selection and differences in environmentally-mediated reproductive constraints can drive sexual size dimorphism, but empirically testing causes of dimorphism is challenging. Manakins (Pipridae), a family of Neotropical birds comprising ~50 species, exhibit both male- and female-biased size dimorphism and are distributed across gradients of precipitation and elevation. Males perform courtship...

Data from: Changes in waterfowl migration phenologies in central North America: implications for future waterfowl conservation

Kent Andersson, Craig Davis, Grant Harris & David Haukos
Globally, migration phenologies of numerous avian species have shifted over the past half-century. Despite North American waterfowl being well researched, published data on shifts in waterfowl migration phenologies remain scarce. Understanding shifts in waterfowl migration phenologies along with potential drivers is critical for guiding future conservation efforts. Therefore, we utilized historical (1955–2008) nonbreeding waterfowl survey data collected at 21 National Wildlife Refuges in the mid- to lower portion of the Central Flyway to summarize changes...

Additional file 2 of Comprehensive characterization of ubiquitinome of human colorectal cancer and identification of potential survival-related ubiquitination

Wei Zhang, Yan Yang, Liewen Lin, Jingquan He, Jingjing Dong, Bin Yan, Wanxia Cai, Yumei Chen, Lianghong Yin, Donge Tang, Fanna Liu & Yong Dai
Additional file 2. Table S1. Ubiquitination annotation. Table S2. Protein annotation. Table S3. 42 proteins having ten or more than ten ubiquitination modifications. Table S4. 20 ubiquitin-binding motifs. Table S5. 2242 proteins with an upregulated ubiquitination and 1204 proteins with a down-regulated ubiquitination. Table S6. 1172 up-regulated proteins and 1700 down-regulated proteins. Table S7. 646 Secretory proteins. Table S8. 53 proteins having an upregulated expression simultaneously with a down-regulated ubiquitination and 116 proteins having down-regulated...

Data from: Population genetics and origin of the native North American agricultural weed waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus)

Katherine E. Waselkov & Kenneth M. Olsen
Premise of the study: The evolution of invasiveness has been extensively studied in natural ecosystems; however, far less is known about the evolution of agricultural invasiveness, despite the major economic impact of weeds on crop productivity. Examining the population structure of recently arisen weeds can provide insights into evolutionary avenues to invasion of agroecosystems. Weeds that originate from wild plants are the most common yet least frequently studied type of agricultural invasive. Here we address...

Data from: Genome-environment associations in sorghum landraces predict adaptive traits

Jesse R. Lasky, Hari D. Upadhyaya, Punna Ramu, Santosh Deshpande, C. Tom Hash, Jason Bonnette, Thomas E. Juenger, Katie Hyma, Charlotte Acharya, Sharon E. Mitchell, Edward S. Buckler, Zachary Brenton, Stephen Kresovich & Geoffrey P. Morris
Improving environmental adaptation in crops is essential for food security under global change, but phenotyping adaptive traits remains a major bottleneck. If associations between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles and environment of origin in crop landraces reflect adaptation, then these could be used to predict phenotypic variation for adaptive traits. We tested this proposition in the global food crop Sorghum bicolor, characterizing 1943 georeferenced landraces at 404,627 SNPs and quantifying allelic associations with bioclimatic and soil...

Data from: Spatial and successional dynamics of microbial biofilm communities in a grassland stream ecosystem

Allison M. Veach, James C. Stegen, Shawn P. Brown, Walter K. Dodds & Ari Jumpponen
Biofilms represent a metabolically active and structurally complex component of freshwater ecosystems. Ephemeral prairie streams are hydrologically harsh and prone to frequent perturbation. Elucidating both functional and structural community changes over time within prairie streams provides a general understanding of microbial responses to environmental disturbance. We examined microbial succession of biofilm communities at three sites in a third-order stream at Konza Prairie over a 2- to 64-day period. Microbial abundance (bacterial abundance, chlorophyll a concentrations)...

Data from: Targeted gene enrichment and high-throughput sequencing for environmental biomonitoring: a case study using freshwater macroinvertebrates

Eddy J. Dowle, Xavier Pochon, Jonathan C. Banks, Karen Shearer & Susanna A. Wood
Recent studies have advocated biomonitoring using DNA techniques. In this study, two high-throughput sequencing (HTS)-based methods were evaluated: amplicon metabarcoding of the cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI) mitochondrial gene and gene enrichment using MYbaits (targeting nine different genes including COI). The gene-enrichment method does not require PCR amplification and thus avoids biases associated with universal primers. Macroinvertebrate samples were collected from 12 New Zealand rivers. Macroinvertebrates were morphologically identified and enumerated, and their biomass...

Data from: Process-based simulation of prairie growth

Cody J. Zilverberg, Jimmy Williams, Curtis Jones, Keith Harmoney, Jay Angerer, Loretta J. Metz & William Fox
When field research is cost- or time-prohibitive, models can inform decision-makers regarding the impact of agricultural policy on production and the environment, but process-based models that simulate animal-plant-soil interaction and ecosystem services in grazing lands are rare. In the U.S.A., APEX (Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender) is a model commonly used to inform policy on cropland, but its ability to simulate grazinglands was less robust. Therefore, we enhanced the APEX model’s plant growth module to improve its...

Data from: Comparative transcriptome and lipidome analyses reveal molecular chilling responses in chilling-tolerant sorghums

Sandeep R. Marla, Sunitha Shiva, Ruth Welti, Sanzhen Liu, John J. Burke & Geoffrey P. Morris
Chilling temperatures (0 to 15°C) are a major constraint for temperate cultivation of tropical-origin crops, including the cereal crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench). Northern Chinese sorghums have adapted to early-season chilling, but molecular mechanisms of chilling tolerance are unknown. We used RNA sequencing of seedlings to compare the chilling-responsive transcriptomes of a chilling-tolerant Chinese accession with a chilling-sensitive US reference line, and mass spectrometry to compare chilling-responsive lipidomes of four chilling-tolerant Chinese accessions with...

Data from: Reproductive isolation and environmental adaptation shape the phylogeography of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae)

Eddy J. Dowle, Ryan R. Bracewell, Michael E. Pfrender, Karen E. Mock, Barbara J. Bentz & Gregory J. Ragland
Chromosomal rearrangement can be an important mechanism driving population differentiation and incipient speciation. In the mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae), deletions on the Y chromosome that are polymorphic among populations are associated with reproductive incompatibility. Here we used RAD sequencing across the entire MPB range in western North America to reveal the extent of the phylogeographic differences between Y haplotypes compared to autosomal and X-linked loci. Clustering and gene flow analyses revealed three distinct...

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