137 Works

Data from: Correlation of native and exotic species richness: a global meta-analysis finds no invasion paradox across scales

Shijia Peng, Nicole L. Kinlock, Jessica Gurevitch, Shao-Lin Peng & Shaolin Peng
Support for the “biotic resistance hypothesis,” that species-rich communities are more successful at resisting invasion by exotic species than are species-poor communities, has long been debated. It has been argued that native-exotic richness relationships (NERR) are negative at small spatial scales and positive at large scales, but evidence for the role of spatial scale on NERR has been contradictory. However, no formal quantitative synthesis has previously examined whether NERR is scale-dependent across multiple studies, and...

Data from: Effects of hummingbird morphology on specialization in pollination networks vary with resource availability

Boris A. Tinoco, Catherine H. Graham, Juan M. Aguilar & Matthias Schleuning
Specialization of species in interaction networks influences network stability and ecosystem functioning. Spatial and temporal variation in resource availability may provide insight into how ecological factors, such as resource abundance, and evolutionary factors, such as phylogenetically conserved morphological traits, influence specialization within mutualistic networks. We used independent measures of hummingbird abundance and resources (nectar), information on hummingbird traits and plant–hummingbird interactions to examine how resource availability and species' morphology influence the specialization of hummingbirds in...

Data from: The response of correlated traits following cessation of fishery-induced selection

Santiago Salinas, Kestrel O. Perez, Tara A. Duffy, Stephen J. Sabatino, Lyndie A. Hice, Stephan B. Munch & David O. Conover
The application of evolutionary principles to the management of fisheries has gained considerable attention recently. Harvesting of fish may apply directional or disruptive selection to key life history traits and evidence for fishery-induced evolution is growing. The traits that are directly selected upon are often correlated (genetically or phenotypically) with a suite of interrelated physiological, behavioral, and morphological characters. A question that has received comparatively little attention is whether or not, after cessation of fishery-induced...

Data from: Independent reversals to terrestriality in squirrels (Rodentia: Sciuridae) support ecologically mediated modes of adaptation

R.G. Rocha, Yuri L.R. Leite, Leonora P. Costa & Danny Rojas
The family Sciuridae is one of the most widespread and ecologically diverse lineage of rodents and represents an ideal model for investigating the evolution of locomotion modes and the historical biogeography of terrestrial mammals. We used a comprehensive database on locomotion modes, an updated phylogeny and novel biogeographic comparative methods to re-assess the evolution of locomotion of squirrels and to investigate if these locomotion modes evolved convergently in different continents. We found that locomotion changes...

Data from: Costs and benefits of group living in primates: an energetic perspective

A. Catherine Markham & Laurence R. Gesquiere
Group size is a fundamental component of sociality, and has important consequences for an individual's fitness as well as the collective and cooperative behaviours of the group as a whole. This review focuses on how the costs and benefits of group living vary in female primates as a function of group size, with a particular emphasis on how competition within and between groups affects an individual's energetic balance. Because the repercussions of chronic energetic stress...

Data from: Genetic background and GxE interactions modulate the penetrance of a naturally occurring wing mutation in Drosophila melanogaster

Joseph Lachance, Lawrence Jung & John R. True
Many genes involved in producing complex traits are incompletely penetrant. One such example is vesiculated, an X-linked gene in Drosophila melanogaster that results in wing defects. To examine the genetic architecture of a complex trait (wings containing vesicles), we placed a naturally occurring variant into multiple autosomal backgrounds and quantified penetrance and expressivity at a range of developmental temperatures. We found significant epistasis, genotype-by-environment interactions, and maternal effects. Sex and temperature effects were modulated by...

Data from: Quantitative ornithology with a commercial marine radar: standard-target calibration, target detection and tracking, and measurement of echoes from individuals and flocks

Samuel S. Urmy & Joseph D. Warren
Marine surveillance radars are commonly used for radar ornithology, but they are rarely calibrated. This prevents them from measuring the radar cross-sections (RCS) of the birds under study. Furthermore, if the birds are aggregated too closely for the radar to resolve them individually, the bulk volume reflectivity cannot be translated into a numerical density. We calibrated a commercial off-the-shelf marine radar using a standard spherical target of known RCS. Once calibrated, the radar was used...

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Data from: A quantitative genetic approach to assess the evolutionary potential of a coastal marine fish to ocean acidification

Alex J. Malvezzi, Christopher S. Murray, Kevin A. Feldheim, Joseph D. DiBattista, Dany Garant, Christopher J. Gobler, Demian D. Chapman & Hannes Baumann
Assessing the potential of marine organisms to adapt genetically to increasing oceanic CO2 levels requires proxies such as heritability of fitness-related traits under ocean acidification (OA). We applied a quantitative genetic method to derive the first heritability estimate of survival under elevated CO2 conditions in a metazoan. Specifically, we reared offspring, selected from a wild coastal fish population (Atlantic silverside, Menidia menidia), at high CO2 conditions (~2,300 μatm) from fertilization to 15 days post hatch,...

Data from: Continuum of vasodilator stress from rest to contrast medium to adenosine hyperemia for fractional flow reserve assessment

Nils P. Johnson, Allen Jeremias, Frederik M. Zimmermann, Julien Adjedj, Nils Witt, Barry Hennigan, Bon-Kwon Koo, Akiko Maehara, Mitsuaki Matsumura, Emanuele Barbato, Giovanni Esposito, Bruno Trimarco, Gilles Rioufol, Seung-Jung Park, Hyoung-Mo Yang, Sérgio B. Baptista, George S. Chrysant, Antonio M. Leone, Colin Berry, Bernard De Bruyne, K. Lance Gould, Richard L. Kirkeeide, Keith G. Oldroyd, Nico H. J. Pijls, William F. Fearon … & Nico H.J. Pijls
OBJECTIVES: We compared the diagnostic performance with adenosine-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) #0.8 of contrast-based FFR (cFFR), resting distal pressure (Pd)/aortic pressure (Pa), and the instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR). BACKGROUND: FFR objectively identifies lesions that benefit from medical therapy versus revascularization. However, FFR requires maximal vasodilation, usually achieved with adenosine. Radiographic contrast injection causes submaximal coronary hyperemia. Therefore, intracoronary contrast could provide an easy and inexpensive tool for predicting FFR. METHODS: We recruited patients undergoing...

Data from: From the field to the lab: best practices for field preservation of bat specimens for molecular analyses

Angelique Corthals, Alynn Martin, Omar M. Warsi, Megan Woller-Skar, Winston Lancaster, Amy Russell & Liliana M. Davalos
Studies in molecular ecology depend on field-collected samples for genetic information, and the tissue sampled and preservation conditions strongly affect the quality of the DNA obtained. DNA yields from different tissue types have seldom been compared, and the relative performance of storage media has never been directly tested, even though these media may influence DNA degradation under field conditions. We analyzed DNA yield from buccal swabs and wing punches harvested from live bats using nucleic...

Data from: Constitutive turnover of histone H2A.Z at yeast promoters requires the preinitiation complex

Michael Tramantano, Lu Sun, Christy Au, Daniel Labuz, Zhimin Liu, Mindy Chou, Chen Shen & Ed Luk
The assembly of the preinitiation complex (PIC) occurs upstream of the +1 nucleosome which, in yeast, obstructs the transcription start site and is frequently assembled with the histone variant H2A.Z. To understand the contribution of the transcription machinery in the disassembly of the +1 H2A.Z nucleosome, conditional mutants were used to block PIC assembly. A quantitative ChIP-seq approach, which allows detection of global occupancy change, was employed to measure H2A.Z occupancy. Blocking PIC assembly resulted...

Data from: How climate extremes—not means—define a species' geographic range boundary via a demographic tipping point

Heather J. Lynch, Marc Rhainds, Justin M. Calabrese, Stephen Cantrell, Chris Cosner & William F. Fagan
Species’ geographic range limits interest biologists and resource managers alike; however, scientists lack strong mechanistic understanding of the factors that set geographic range limits in the field, especially for animals. There exists a clear need for detailed case studies that link mechanisms to spatial dynamics and boundaries because such mechanisms allow us to predict whether climate change is likely to change a species’ geographic range and, if so, how abundance in marginal populations compares to...

Data from: Opening the tap: increased riverine connectivity strengthens marine food web pathways.

Beatriz S. Dias, Michael G. Frisk & Adrian Jordaan
Reduction of ecosystem connectivity has long-lasting impacts on food webs. Anadromous fish, which migrate from marine to freshwater ecosystems to complete reproduction, have seen their historically larger ecosystem role undercut by widespread riverine habitat fragmentation and other impacts mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. The result has been extensive extirpations and increased susceptibility to a suite of environmental factors that currently impede recovery. Under this present-day context of reduced productivity and connectivity, aggressive management actions and...

Data from: Parallel molecular evolution in pathways, genes, and sites in high-elevation hummingbirds revealed by comparative transcriptomics

Marisa C.W. Lim, Christopher C. Witt, Catherine H. Graham & Liliana M. Davalos
High-elevation organisms experience shared environmental challenges that include low oxygen availability, cold temperatures, and intense UV radiation. Consequently, repeated evolution of the same genetic mechanisms may occur across high-elevation taxa. To test this prediction, we investigated the extent to which the same biochemical pathways, genes, or sites were subject to parallel molecular evolution for 12 Andean hummingbird species (family: Trochilidae) representing several independent transitions to high elevation across the phylogeny. Across high-elevation species, we discovered...

Data from: Empirical and Bayesian approaches to fossil-only divergence times: a study across three reptile clades

Alan H. Turner, Adam C. Pritchard & Nicholas J. Matzke
Estimating divergence times on phylogenies is critical in paleontological and neontological studies. Chronostratigraphically-constrained fossils are the only direct evidence of absolute timing of species divergence. Strict temporal calibration of fossil-only phylogenies provides minimum divergence estimates, and various methods have been proposed to estimate divergences beyond these minimum values. We explore the utility of simultaneous estimation of tree topology and divergence times using BEAST tip-dating on datasets consisting only of fossils by using relaxed morphological clocks...

Data from: Anthropogenic extinction dominates Holocene declines of West Indian mammals

Siobhán B. Cooke, Liliana M. Dávalos, Alexis M. Mychajliw, Samuel T. Turvey & Nathan S. Upham
The extensive postglacial mammal losses in the West Indies provide an opportunity to evaluate extinction dynamics, but limited data have hindered our ability to test hypotheses. Here, we analyze the tempo and dynamics of extinction using a novel data set of faunal last-appearance dates and human first-appearance dates, demonstrating widespread overlap between humans and now-extinct native mammals. Humans arrived in four waves (Lithic, Archaic, Ceramic, and European), each associated with increased environmental impact. Large-bodied mammals...

Supporting data to: Evolution of realized Eltonian niches across Rajidae species

Oliver Shipley, Joseph Kelly, Joseph Bizzarro, Jill Olin, Robert Cerrato, Michael Power & Michael Frisk
The notion that closely related species resemble each other in ecological niche space (i.e., phylogenetic dependence) has been a longstanding, contentious paradigm in evolutionary biology, the incidence of which is important for predicting the ecosystem-level effects of species loss. Despite being examined across a multitude of terrestrial taxa, many aspects of niche conservatism have yet to be explored in marine species, especially for characteristics related to resource use and trophic behavior (Eltonian niche characteristics, ENCs)....

Resources for gasAcu1-4, a new stickleback reference genome

Garrett Roberts Kingman, Heidi Chen, David Kingsley, Deven Vyas, Krishna Veeramah, Felicity Jones & Mike Bell
gasAcu1-4 is a new version of the stickleback reference genome. It only minorly differs from the 2017 Hi-C guided assembly by Peichel, Sullivan, Liachko, and White (https://doi.org/10.1093/jhered/esx058) to improve the subtelomeric Pitx1 locus and the mitochondrial genome. We here present basic resources for utilizing this version of the reference genome: the fasta sequence of the assembly and liftOver chains for converting coordinates between this reference version and the original (Broad S1) gasAcu1 assembly (https://www.nature.com/articles/nature10944). This...

The allometry of daily energy expenditure in hummingbirds: an energy budget approach

Anusha Shankar, Donald R Powers, Liliana M Dávalos & Catherine H Graham
1. Within-clade allometric relationships represent standard laws of scaling between energy and size, and their outliers provide new avenues for physiological and ecological research. According to the metabolic level boundaries hypothesis, metabolic rates as a function of mass are expected to scale closer to 0.67 when driven by surface-related processes (e.g., heat or water flux), while volume-related processes (e.g., activity) generate slopes closer to one. 2. In birds, daily energy expenditure (DEE) scales with body...

Data from: Large-scale assessment of intra- and inter-annual breeding success using a remote camera network

Casey Youngflesh, Fiona M. Jones, Heather J. Lynch, Joan Arthur, Zuzana Ročkaiová, Holly R. Torsey & Tom Hart
Changes in the physical environment along the Antarctic Peninsula have been among the most rapid anywhere on the planet. In concert with environmental change, the potential for direct human disturbance resulting from tourism, scientific programs, and commercial fisheries continues to rise in the region. While seabirds, such as the gentoo penguin Pygoscelis papua, are commonly used to assess the impact of these disturbances on natural systems, research efforts are often hampered by limited spatial coverage...

Data from: A parapithecid stem anthropoid of African origin in the Paleogene of South America

Erik Seiffert, Marcelo Tejedor, John Fleagle, Nelson Novo, Fanny Cornejo, Mariano Bond, Dorien De Vries & Kenneth Campbell
Phylogenetic evidence suggests that platyrrhine (or New World) monkeys and caviomorph rodents of the Western Hemisphere derive from source groups from the Eocene of Afro-Arabia, a landmass that was ~1500 to 2000 kilometers east of South America during the late Paleogene. Here, we report evidence for a third mammalian lineage of African origin in the Paleogene of South America—a newly discovered genus and species of parapithecid anthropoid primate from Santa Rosa in Amazonian Perú. Bayesian...

Immigrant males’ memory acts to reduce ranging overlap and mating competition in wild baboons

Julien Collet, Nathalie Pettorelli, Alice Baniel, Alecia Carter, Elise Huchard, Andrew King, Alexander Lee, Harry Marshall & Guy Cowlishaw
Mechanistic models suggest that information acquired by animals (“knowledge”) could shape home range patterns and dynamics, and how neighbours share space. In social species this would suggest that immigrants could bring new knowledge into social groups, potentially affecting the dynamics of home range overlap. We tested this “immigrant knowledge hypothesis” in a wild population of chacma baboons (Papio ursinus). We used data collected between 2005 and 2013 on two neighbouring troops in Namibia, comprising GPS...

Data from: Ecological causes of decelerating diversification in carnivoran mammals

Antonin Machac, David Storch & John J. Wiens
Clade diversification is a central topic in macroevolutionary studies. Recently, it has been shown that diversification rates appear to decelerate over time in many clades. What causes this deceleration remains unclear, but it has been proposed that competition for limited resources between sympatric, ecologically similar species slows diversification. Employing carnivoran mammals as a model system, we test this hypothesis using a comprehensive time-calibrated phylogeny. We also explore several conceptually related explanations including limited geographic area...

Data from: Population structure and phylogeography of the Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) across the Scotia Arc

Hila Levy, Gemma V. Clucas, Alex D. Rogers, Adam D. Leaché, Kate L. Ciborowski, Michael J. Polito, Heather J. Lynch, Michael J. Dunn & Tom Hart
Climate change, fisheries pressure on penguin prey, and direct human disturbance of wildlife have all been implicated in causing large shifts in the abundance and distribution of penguins in the Southern Ocean. Without mark-recapture studies, understanding how colonies form and, by extension, how ranges shift is challenging. Genetic studies, particularly focused on newly established colonies, provide a snapshot of colonisation and can reveal the extent to which shifts in abundance and occupancy result from changes...

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