6 Works

Data from: Estimation of a killer whale (Orcinus orca) population’s diet using sequencing analysis of DNA from feces

Michael J. Ford, Jennifer Hempelmann, M. Bradley Hanson, Katherine L. Ayres, Robin W. Baird, Candice K. Emmons, Jessica I. Lundin, Gregory S. Schorr, Samuel K. Wasser & Linda K. Park
Estimating diet composition is important for understanding interactions between predators and prey and thus illuminating ecosystem function. The diet of many species, however, is difficult to observe directly. Genetic analysis of fecal material collected in the field is therefore a useful tool for gaining insight into wild animal diets. In this study, we used high-throughput DNA sequencing to quantitatively estimate the diet composition of an endangered population of wild killer whales (Orcinus orca) in their...

Data from: Broodstock history strongly influences natural spawning success in hatchery steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Michael J. Ford, Andrew R. Murdoch, Michael J. Hughes, Todd R. Seamons, Eric LaHood, Eric S. LaHood & Michael S. Hughes
We used genetic parentage analysis of 6200 potential parents and 5497 juvenile offspring to evaluate the relative reproductive success of hatchery and natural steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss) when spawning in the wild between 2008 and 2011 in the Wenatchee River, Washington. Hatchery fish originating from two prior generation hatchery parents had <20% of the reproductive success of natural origin spawners. In contrast, hatchery females originating from a cross between two natural origin parents of the prior...

Data from: The structure and distribution of benthic communities on a shallow seamount (Cobb Seamount, Northeast Pacific Ocean)

Cherisse Du Preez, Janelle M. R. Curtis & M. Elizabeth Clarke
Partially owing to their isolation and remote distribution, research on seamounts is still in its infancy, with few comprehensive datasets and empirical evidence supporting or refuting prevailing ecological paradigms. As anthropogenic activity in the high seas increases, so does the need for better understanding of seamount ecosystems and factors that influence the distribution of sensitive benthic communities. This study used quantitative community analyses to detail the structure, diversity, and distribution of benthic mega-epifauna communities on...

Data from: Model-based inference for estimating shifts in species distribution, area occupied and centre of gravity

James T. Thorson, Malin L. Pinsky & Eric J. Ward
Changing climate is already impacting the spatial distribution of many taxa, including bees, plants, birds, butterflies and fishes. A common goal is to detect range shifts in response to climate change, including changes in the centre of the population's distribution (the centre of gravity, COG), population boundaries and area occupied. Conventional estimators, such as the abundance-weighted average (AWA) estimator for COG, confound range shifts with changes in the spatial distribution of available survey data and...

Data from: Forty years of seagrass population stability and resilience in an urbanizing estuary

Andrew Olaf Shelton, Tessa B. Francis, Blake E. Feist, Gregory D. Williams, Adam Lindquist, Phillip S. Levin & Philip S. Levin
Coasts and estuaries contain among the most productive and ecologically important habitats in the world and face intense pressure from current and projected human activities, including coastal development. Seagrasses are a key habitat feature in many estuaries perceived to be in widespread decline owing to human actions. We use spatio-temporal models and a 41-year time series from 100s of km of shoreline which includes over 160 000 observations from Puget Sound, Washington, USA, to examine...

Data from: Genetic signatures of ecological diversity along an urbanization gradient

Ryan P. Kelly, James L. O'Donnell, Natalie C. Lowell, Andrew O. Shelton, Jameal F. Samhouri, Shannon M. Hennessey, Blake E. Feist & Gregory D. Williams
Despite decades of work in environmental science and ecology, estimating human influences on ecosystems remains challenging. This is partly due to complex chains of causation among ecosystem elements, exacerbated by the difficulty of collecting biological data at sufficient spatial, temporal, and taxonomic scales. Here, we demonstrate the utility of environmental DNA (eDNA) for quantifying associations between human land use and changes in an adjacent ecosystem. We analyze metazoan eDNA sequences from water sampled in nearshore...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Northwest Fisheries Science Center
    6
  • University of Washington
    3
  • Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
    2
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    1
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    1
  • Cascadia Research
    1
  • Rutgers University
    1