38 Works

Head and mandible shapes are highly integrated yet represent two distinct modules within and among worker sub-castes of the ant genus Pheidole

Alexandre Casadei Ferreira, Nicholas R. Friedman, Evan Economo, Marcio Pie & Rodrigo Feitosa
Ants use their mandibles for a wide variety of tasks related to substrate manipulation, brood transport, food processing, and colony defence. Due to constraints involved in colony upkeep, ants evolved a remarkable diversity of mandibular forms, often related to specific roles such as specialized hunting and seed milling. Considering these varied functional demands, we focused on understanding how the mandible and head shape vary within and between Pheidole sub-castes. Using x-ray microtomography and 3D geometric...

Acaulescence promotes speciation and shapes the distribution patterns of palms in Neotropical seasonally dry habitats

Cibele Cássia-Silva, Rafael Silva Oliveira, Lílian P. Sales, Cíntia G. Freitas, Lucas Jardim, Thaíse Emilio, Christine D. Bacon & Rosane G. Collevatti
Rainforests have been a source of lineages to open and seasonally dry habitats throughout Angiosperm evolution, especially in the Neotropics. However, the underlying mechanisms that allow such shifts remain poorly understood at large spatial scales. Here, we test whether acaulescence (an underground stem or a very short stem concealed in the ground) has affected the colonization and speciation in Neotropical seasonally dry habitats by cocosoid palms (Cocoseae). Acaulescent species maintain their growth underground, which increases...

Data from: Geographic mosaic of plant evolution: extrafloral nectary variation mediated by ant and herbivore assemblages

Anselmo Nogueira, Pedro J. Rey, Julio M. Alcántara, Rodrigo M. Feitosa & Lúcia G. Lohmann
Herbivory is an ecological process that is known to generate different patterns of selection on defensive plant traits across populations. Studies on this topic could greatly benefit from the general framework of the Geographic Mosaic Theory of Coevolution (GMT). Here, we hypothesize that herbivory represents a strong pressure for extrafloral nectary (EFN) bearing plants, with differences in herbivore and ant visitor assemblages leading to different evolutionary pressures among localities and ultimately to differences in EFN...

Data from: What controls variation in carbon use efficiency among Amazonian tropical forests?

Christopher E. Doughty, Gregory R. Goldsmith, Nicolas Raab, Cecile A. J. Girardin, Filio Farfan-Amezquita, Walter Huaraca Huasco, Javier E. Silva-Espejo, Alejandro Araujo-Murakami, Antonio C. L. Da Costa, Wanderley Rocha, David Galbraith, Patrick Meir, Dan B. Metcalfe, Yadvinder Malhi & Walter Huaraca-Huasco
Why do some forests produce biomass more efficiently than others? Variations in Carbon Use Efficiency (CUE: total Net Primary Production (NPP)/ Gross Primary Production (GPP)) may be due to changes in wood residence time (Biomass/NPPwood), temperature, or soil nutrient status. We tested these hypotheses in 14, one ha plots across Amazonian and Andean forests where we measured most key components of net primary production (NPP: wood, fine roots, and leaves) and autotrophic respiration (Ra; wood,...

A target enrichment probe set for resolving the flagellate land plant tree of life

Jesse W. Breinholt, Sarah B. Carey, George P. Tiley, E. Christine Davis, Lorena Endara, Stuart F. McDaniel, Leandro Neves, Emily B. Sessa, Matt Von Konrat, Susan Fawcett, Stefanie M. Ickert-Bond, Paulo H. Labiak, Juan Larraín, Marcus Lehnert, Lily R. Lewis, Nathalie S. Nagalingum, Nikisha Patel, Stefan A. Rensing, Weston Testo, Alejandra Vasco, Juan Carlos Villarreal, Evelyn Webb Williams, J. Gordon Burleigh, Sahut Chantanaorrapint, Leandro G. Neves … & Stefanie M. Ickert‐Bond
Premise of the Study: New sequencing technologies enable the possibility of generating large-scale molecular datasets for constructing the plant tree of life. We describe a new probe set for target enrichment sequencing to generate nuclear sequence data to build phylogenetic trees with any flagellate land plants, including hornworts, liverworts, mosses, lycophytes, ferns, and all gymnosperms. Methods and Results: We leveraged existing transcriptome and genome sequence data to design a set of 56,989 probes for target...

Data from: Shock and stabilisation following long-term drought in tropical forest from 15 years of litterfall dynamics

Lucy Rowland, Antonio C. L. Da Costa, Alex A. R. Oliveira, Samuel S. Almeida, Leandro V. Ferreira, Yadvinder Malhi, Dan B. Metcalfe, Maurizio Mencuccini, John Grace & Patrick Meir
Litterfall dynamics in tropical forests are a good indicator of overall tropical forest function, indicative of carbon invested in both photosynthesising tissues and reproductive organs such as flowers and fruits. These dynamics are sensitive to changes in climate, such as drought, but little is known about the long-term responses of tropical forest litterfall dynamics to extended drought stress. We present a 15-year dataset of litterfall (leaf, flower and fruit, and twigs) from the world's only...

A “Dirty” Footprint: Soil macrofauna biodiversity and fertility in Amazonian Dark Earths and adjacent soils

Wilian C. Demetrio, Ana C. Conrado, Agno N. S. Acioli, Alexandre C. Ferreira, Marie L. C. Bartz, Samuel W. James, Elodie Silva, Lilianne S. Maia, Gilvan C. Martins, Rodrigo S. Macedo, David W. G. Stanton, Patrick Lavelle, Elena Velasquez, Anne Zangerlé, Rafaella Barbosa, Sandra C. Tapia‐Coral, Aleksander W. Muniz, Alessandra Santos, Talita Ferreira, Rodrigo F. Segalla, Thibaud Decaëns, Herlon S. Nadolny, Clara P. Peña‐Venegas, Cláudia M. B. F. Maia, Amarildo Pasini … & George G. Brown
Amazonian rainforests once thought to hold an innate pristine wilderness, are increasingly known to have been densely inhabited by populations showing a diverse and complex cultural background prior to European arrival. To what extent these societies impacted their landscape is unclear. Amazonian Dark Earths (ADEs) are fertile soils found throughout the Amazon Basin, created by pre-Columbian societies as a result of more sedentary habits. Much is known of the chemistry of these soils, yet their...

Mullerian mimicry and the colouration patterns of sympatric coral snakes

Renan Bosque, Chaz Hyseni, Maria Luiza Gonçalves Santos, Eduardo Rangel, Camila Juliana Da Silva Dias, Jacob Hearin, , Fabricius Maia, Guarino Colli & Brice Noonan
This dataset cointains data used for the study of Müllerian mimicry in coral snakes. Coral snakes in the genus Micrurus are venomous, aposematic organisms that signal danger to predators through vivid colouration. Previous studies found that they serve as models to several harmless species of Batesian mimics. However, the extent to which Micrurus species engage in Müllerian mimicry remains poorly understood. We integrate detailed morphological and geographical distribution data to investigate if coral snakes are...

Ants of the State of Pará, Brazil: a historical and comprehensive dataset of a key biodiversity hotspot in the Amazon Basin

Emília Zoppas De Albuquerque, Lívia Pires Do Prado, Joudellys Andrade-Silva, Emely Laira Silva De Siqueira, Kelly Liane Da Silva Sampaio, Diego Alves, Carlos Roberto F. Brandão, Paloma L. Andrade, Rodrigo Machado Feitosa, Elmo Borges De Azevedo Koch, Jacques Hubert Charles Delabie, Itanna Fernandes, Fabrício Beggiato Baccaro, Jorge Luiz Pereira Souza, Rony Peterson Almeida & Rogério R. Silva
The state of Pará in northern Brazil is located entirely within the Amazon Basin and harbors a great diversity of landscape and vegetation types that support high levels of biodiversity. Here, we provide a comprehensive inventory of ant species and their distribution in Pará. This regional list is based on an extensive review of species records from published and unpublished sources covering a period of 134 years (1886–2020) and includes the five most representative ant...

Data from: Evidence for a thoracic crop in the workers of some Neotropical Pheidole species (Formicidae: Myrmicinae)

Alexandre Casadei Ferreira, Georg Fischer & Evan Economo
The ability of ant colonies to transport, store, and distribute food resources through trophallaxis is a key advantage of social life. Nonetheless, how the structure of the digestive system has adapted across the ant phylogeny to facilitate these abilities is still not well understood. The crop and proventriculus, structures in the ant foregut (stomodeum), have received most attention for their roles in trophallaxis. However, potential roles of the esophagus have not been as well studied....

Phylogeny and character evolution of the neotropical fern genus Cyclodium (Dryopteridaceae)

Amabily Bohn, Alan R. Smith, Fernando B. Matos, Robbin C. Moran & Paulo H. Labiak
Cyclodium is a neotropical fern genus with 13 species, most of them distributed in the Amazonian lowlands, particularly in the Guianan region and along the border with the Andes. It belongs to the polybotryoid clade of Dryopteridaceae, being unique within this clade by a combination of characters related to rhizome growth, leaf dimorphism, anastomosing venation, and peltate indusia. Here we present a molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for Cyclodium resulting from Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood analyses, using...

Landscape conservation as a strategy for recovering biodiversity: lessons from a long-term program of pasture restoration in the southern Atlantic Forest

Marcia Marques, Fernanda Cardoso, Elivane Capellesso, Ricardo Britez, Gabriel Inague & Marcia Marques
Although ecological restoration has entered the global agenda to reverse different anthropogenic disturbances, we still know little about how this solution interacts with other conservation strategies, to avoid the progressive loss of species and ecosystem services. Here we evaluate one of the pioneering restoration programs in the southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest, where the combination of conservation and restoration efforts have been carried out for 20 years. Specifically, we tested how landscape characteristics, restoration strategies and...

Data from: Hidden leks in a migratory songbird: mating advantages for earlier and more attractive males

Lilian Manica, Jeff Graves, Jeffrey Podos & Regina Macedo
In some socially monogamous birds, territories sometimes occur in aggregations. The “hidden lek” hypothesis suggests that territorial aggregations might be explained by males establishing territories near successful males (“hotshot” model), or by females preferring to mate in large clusters (“female preference” model). In both scenarios, clusters would provide more opportunities for finding mates and achieving extra-pair copulations. Our study tests predictions of these two models in the blue-black grassquit (Volatinia jacarina). Males of this species...

Data for: Phylogenomic analyses reveal non-monophyly of the antbird genera Herpsilochmus and Sakesphorus (Thamnophilidae), with description of a new genus for Herpsilochmus sellowi

Gustavo Bravo, Bret Whitney, Ricardo Belmonte-Lopes, Marcos Bornschein, Natalia Aristizabal, Renata Beco, Jaqueline Battilana, Luciano Naka, Alexandre Aleixo, Marcio Pie, Luis Silveira, Elizabeth Derryberry & Robb Brumfield
The family Thamnophilidae is a species-rich Neotropical radiation of passerine birds. Current classification of its 235 species is mostly based on morphological similarities, but recent studies integrating comprehensive phenotypic and phylogenetic data have redefined taxonomic limits of several taxa. Here, we assess generic relationships of Herpsilochmus, Sakesphorus, Thamnophilus, Biatas, and Dysithamnus using DNA sequences from the mitochondrion, nuclear exons, and ultraconserved elements (UCEs), with further attention to interspecific relationships within Herpsilochmus. We show that Herpsilochmus...

Data from: Apparent signal of competition limits diversification after ecological transitions from marine to freshwater habitats

Ricardo Betancur-R., Guillermo Orti, Alexandre P. Marceniuk, Ariel M. Stein & R. Alexander Pyron
Adaptive radiations are typically triggered when a lineage encounters a significant range of open niche space (ecological opportunity), stemming from i) colonization of new areas, ii) extinction of competitors, or iii) key innovations. The most well-known of these is the colonization of new areas, either through geographic dispersal or the invasion of a novel ecological habitats. One aspect of ecological opportunity that has rarely been studied, however, is whether the existence of potential competitors may...

Data from: \"De novo transcriptome assembly of the mountain fly Drosophila nigrosparsa using short RNA-seq reads\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 August 2014-30 September 2014

Wolfgang Arthofer, Francesco Cicconardi, Nicola Palmieri, Viola Nolte, Christian Schlötterer, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner, Florian M. Steiner, Marcelo Vallinoto, David A. Weese, B. L. Banbury, R. B. Harris, David S. Kang, Cheolho Sim, Thomas F. Duda, A. D. Leaché, Miguel Carneiro, Coralie Nourisson & Fernando Sequeira
Drosophila (Drosophila) nigrosparsa is a habitat specialist restricted to the European montane/alpine zone (Bächli 2008). Mountain biodiversity is considered highly vulnerable to ongoing climate warming (IPCC 2013), and organisms at high altitudes have only limited possibility to shift to cooler habitats at elevations above (Pertoldi & Bach 2007). For such species, rapid evolution may offer a solution for long-term survival. We are establishing D. nigrosparsa as a model system to test the extent and tempo...

Data from: Molecular data and distribution dynamics indicate a recent and incomplete separation of manakins species of the genus Antilophia (Aves: Pipridae) in response to Holocene climate change

Leilton Willians Luna, Thainara Oliveira Souza, Linconl Silva Carneiro, Weber A. De Girão E Silva, Horacio Schneider, Iracilda Sampaio, Juliana Araripe & Péricles Seno Do Rêgo
To determine a hypothetical scenario that accounts for the diversification of the two species of the genus Antilophia, we conducted multilocus molecular comparisons and species distribution modeling for the two taxa, which have distinct male plumage coloration patterns and allopatric geographic distributions, despite the high degree of genetic similarity indicated by recent studies. Three mitochondrial and three nuclear fragments were analyzed. The results indicate clear differences in the genetic diversity of the two species, but...

Data from: Mating system and genetic diversity of progenies before and after logging: a case study of Bagassa guianensis (Moraceae), a low-density dioecious tree of the Amazonian forest

Cinthya C. B. Arruda, Marivana B. Silva, Alexandre M. Sebbenn, Milton Kanashiro, Maristerra R. Lemes & Rogério Gribel
The logging of large trees in tropical forests causes a decrease in the density of reproductive individuals, which likely affects the pattern of pollen dispersal and the mating system of the remaining trees in the population. Here, we investigate the impact of logging on mating system and genetic diversity of the low-density, thrip-pollinated, dioecious tree Bagassa guianensis within a 500-ha plot at Tapajós National Forest, Pará State, Brazil. Mating system parameters of the logged population...

Data from: Cross-cultural variation in men’s preference for sexual dimorphism in women’s faces

Mikhail V. Kozlov, Huajian Cai, Jorge Contreras-Garduño, Barnaby J. Dixson, Gavita A. Oana, Gwenaël Kaminski, Norman P. Li, Minna T. Lyons, Ike E. Onyishi, Keshav Prasai, Farid Pazhoohi, Pavol Prokop, Sandra L. Rosales Cardozo, Nicolle Sydney, Jose C. Yong, Markus J. Rantala, U. M. Marcinkowska & J. Contreras-Garduno
Both attractiveness judgements and mate preferences vary considerably cross-culturally. We investigated whether men's preference for femininity in women's faces varies between 28 countries with diverse health conditions by analysing responses of 1972 heterosexual participants. Although men in all countries preferred feminized over masculinized female faces, we found substantial differences between countries in the magnitude of men's preferences. Using an average femininity preference for each country, we found men's facial femininity preferences correlated positively with the...

Data from: Socioeconomic determinants of antibiotic consumption in the state of São Paulo, Brazil: the effect of restricting over-the-counter sales

Breno S. Kliemann, Anna S. Levin, M. Luísa Moura, Icaro Boszczowski & J. J. Lewis
Background: Improper antibiotic use is one of the main drivers of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, increasing infectious diseases morbidity and mortality and raising costs of healthcare. The level of antibiotic consumption has been shown to vary according to socioeconomic determinants (SED) such as income and access to education. In many Latin American countries, antibiotics could be easily purchased without a medical prescription in private pharmacies before enforcement of restrictions on over-the-counter (OTC) sales in recent...

Data from: Recent chapters of Neotropical history overlooked in phylogeography: shallow divergence explains phenotype and genotype uncoupling in Antilophia manakins

Fábio Raposo Do Amaral, Marcos M. Coelho, Alexandre Aleixo, Leilton W. Luna, Péricles S. Do Rêgo, Thainara O. Souza, Weber A.G. Silva & Gregory Thom
Establishing links between phenotypic and genotypic variation is a central goal of evolutionary biology, as they might provide important insights into evolutionary processes shaping genetic and species diversity in nature. One of the more intriguing possibilities is when no genetic divergence is found to be associated with conspicuous phenotypic divergence. In that case, speciation theory predicts that phenotypic divergence may still occur in the presence of significant gene flow—thereby resulting in little genomic divergence—when genetic...

Data from: Using trophic structure to reveal patterns of trait-based community assembly across niche dimensions

Daniel B. Fitzgerald, Kirk O. Winemiller, Mark H. Sabaj-Perez & Leandro M. Sousa
1. Trait-based approaches for studying community assembly have improved understanding of mechanisms; however, the challenge of interpreting process from pattern is complicated by the possibility of multiple mechanisms operating simultaneously. Different traits may influence the assembly process in different ways. Analyzing patterns of functional diversity among co-occurring species for each trait individually may aid interpretation of complex assembly processes; yet, few studies have tested whether patterns vary depending on trait function. 2. We used tropical...

Data from: Ecology and signal structure drive the evolution of synchronous displays

Daniela M Perez, Enzo Luigi Crisigiovanni, Marcio Roberto Pie, Ana Claudia Rorato, Sergio Roberto Lopes & Sabrina B L Araujo
Animal synchrony is found in phylogenetically distant animal groups, indicating behavioural adaptations to different selective pressures and in different signaling modalities. A notable example of synchronous display is found in fiddler crabs in that males wave their single enlarged claw during courtship. They present species-specific signals, which are composed of distinctive movement signatures. Given that synchronous waving has been reported for several fiddler crab species, the display pattern could influence the ability of a given...

The influence of biogeographical and evolutionary histories on morphological trait-matching and resource specialization in mutualistic hummingbird-plant networks

Bo Dalsgaard, Pietro Maruyama, Jesper Sonne, Katrine Hansen, Thais Zanata, Stefan Abrahamczyk, Ruben Alarcon, Andréa Araujo, Francielle Araújo, Silvana Buzato, Edgar Chávez-González, Aline Coelho, Pete Cotton, Román Díaz-Valenzuela, Maria Dufke, Paula Enríquez, Manoel Martins Dias Filho, Erich Fischer, Glauco Kohler, Carlos Lara, Flor Maria Las-Casas, Liliana Rosero Lasprilla, Adriana Machado, Caio Machado, Maria Maglianesi … & Ana M. Martín González
Functional traits can determine pairwise species interactions, such as those between plants and pollinators. However, the effects of biogeography and evolutionary history on trait-matching and trait-mediated resource specialization remain poorly understood. We compiled a database of 93 mutualistic hummingbird-plant networks (including 181 hummingbird and 1,256 plant species), complemented by morphological measures of hummingbird bill and floral corolla length. We divided the hummingbirds into their principal clades and used knowledge on hummingbird biogeography to divide the...

Why signal if you are not attractive? Courtship synchrony in a fiddler crab

Lauren Harrison, Gabriela Melo, Daniela Perez & Patricia Backwell
Synchronised male courtship signals are puzzling because males generally compete with each other for females. Male Austruca mjoebergi fiddler crabs wave in synchrony to attract females, but, all else being equal, females have a strong preference for ‘leader’ males that can produce waves before other males (‘followers’). So why do followers participate in synchrony? Here, we experimentally investigate three explanations for why followers might wave in synchrony: 1) followers obtain a small proportion of matings,...

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