34 Works

Data from: The relative strengths of rapid and delayed density dependence acting on a terrestrial herbivore change along a pollution gradient

Mark D. Hunter & Mikhail V. Kozlov
1. Animal populations vary in response to a combination of density dependent and density independent forces, which interact to drive their population dynamics. Understanding how abiotic forces mediate the form and strength of density dependent processes remains a central goal of ecology, and is of increasing urgency in a rapidly changing world. 2. Here, we report for the first time that industrial pollution determines the relative strength of rapid and delayed density dependence operating on...

Data from: Frequency of virus-resistant hosts determines experimental community dynamics

Sebastian Coloma, Ursula Gaedke, Kaarina Sivonen & Teppo Hiltunen
Parasites, such as bacterial viruses (phages), can have large effects on host populations both at the ecological and evolutionary levels. In the case of cyanobacteria, phages can reduce primary production and infected hosts release intracellular nutrients influencing planktonic food web structure, community dynamics and biogeochemical cycles. Cyanophages may be of great importance in aquatic food webs during large cyanobacterial blooms unless the host population becomes resistant to phage infection. The consequences on plankton community dynamics...

Data from: Drivers of vegetative dormancy across herbaceous perennial plant species

Richard P. Shefferson, Tiiu Kull, Michael J. Hutchings, Marc-André Selosse, Hans Jacquemyn, Kimberly M. Kellett, Eric S. Menges, Richard B. Primack, Juha Tuomi, Kirsi Alahuhta, Sonja Hurskainen, Helen M. Alexander, Derek S. Anderson, Rein Brys, Emilia Brzosko, Slavomir Dostálik, Katharine Gregg, Zdeněk Ipser, Anne Jäkäläniemi, Jana Jersáková, W. Dean Kettle, Melissa K. McCormick, Ana Mendoza, Michael T. Miller, Asbjørn Moen … & Dennis F. Whigham
Vegetative dormancy, that is the temporary absence of aboveground growth for ≥ 1 year, is paradoxical, because plants cannot photosynthesise or flower during dormant periods. We test ecological and evolutionary hypotheses for its widespread persistence. We show that dormancy has evolved numerous times. Most species displaying dormancy exhibit life‐history costs of sprouting, and of dormancy. Short‐lived and mycoheterotrophic species have higher proportions of dormant plants than long‐lived species and species with other nutritional modes. Foliage...

Data from: Counting with DNA in metabarcoding studies: how should we convert sequence reads to dietary data?

Bruce E. Deagle, Austen C. Thomas, Julie C. McInnes, Laurence J. Clarke, Eero J. Vesterinen, Elizabeth L. Clare, Tyler R. Kartzinel & J. Paige Eveson
Advances in DNA sequencing technology have revolutionised the field of molecular analysis of trophic interactions and it is now possible to recover counts of food DNA sequences from a wide range of dietary samples. But what do these counts mean? To obtain an accurate estimate of a consumer’s diet should we work strictly with datasets summarising frequency of occurrence of different food taxa, or is it possible to use relative number of sequences? Both approaches...

Data from: Grab my tail: evolution of dazzle stripes and colourful tails in lizards

Gopal Murali, Sami Merilaita & Ullasa Kodandaramaiah
Understanding the functions of animal coloration has been a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. For example, the widespread occurrence of striking longitudinal stripes and colourful tails in lizards begs for an explanation. Experiments have suggested that colourful tails can deflect attacks towards the tail (the ‘deflection’ hypothesis), which is sacrificable in most lizards, thereby increasing the chance of escape. Studies also suggest that in moving lizards, longitudinal body stripes can redirect predators’ strikes towards the...

Data from: Table for five, please: dietary partitioning in boreal bats

Eero J. Vesterinen, Anna I. E. Puisto, Anna S. Blomberg & Thomas M. Lilley
Differences in diet can explain resource partitioning in apparently similar, sympatric species. Here, we analyzed 1,252 fecal droppings from five species (Eptesicus nilssonii, Myotis brandtii, M. daubentonii, M. mystacinus, and Plecotus auritus) to reveal their dietary niches using fecal DNA metabarcoding. We identified nearly 550 prey species in 13 arthropod orders. Two main orders (Diptera and Lepidoptera) formed the majority of the diet for all species, constituting roughly 80%–90% of the diet. All five species...

Data from: Rapid sex-specific evolution of age at maturity is shaped by genetic architecture in Atlantic salmon

Yann Czorlich, Tutku Aykanat, Jaakko Erkinaro, Panu Orell & Craig R. Primmer
Understanding the mechanisms by which populations adapt to their environments is a fundamental aim in biology. However, it remains challenging to identify the genetic basis of traits, provide evidence of genetic changes and quantify phenotypic responses. Age at maturity in Atlantic salmon represents an ideal trait to study contemporary adaptive evolution as it has been associated with a single locus in the vgll3 region, and has also strongly changed in recent decades. Here, we provide...

Data from: Transient growth-enhancing effects of elevated maternal thyroid hormones at no apparent oxidative cost during early postnatal period

Bin-Yan Hsu, Blandine Doligez, Lars Gustafsson & Suvi Ruuskanen
Maternal thyroid hormones (THs) have been proven crucial for embryonic development in humans, but their influence within the natural variation on wild animals remains unknown. So far the only two studies that experimentally investigated the potential fitness consequences of maternal THs in birds found inconsistent results. More studies are thus required to assess the general effects of maternal THs and their influences on more behavioral and physiological parameters. In this study, we experimentally elevated yolk...

Data from: Estimating population density of the white-tailed deer in Finland using non-invasive genetic sampling and spatial capture–recapture

Jenni Poutanen, Jyrki Pusenius, Mikael Wikström & Jon E. Brommer
The white-tailed deer is an important game species in Finland. We evaluated the potential of estimating the white-tailed deer pre-harvest density using non-invasive DNA collection within a spatial capture–recapture (SCR) framework. We sampled faeces during three weekly visits in autumn 2015 from 180, 20 x 20 m plots clustered in groups of four. Individual identification was based on 12–14 microsatellites. Of the 245 faecal samples collected, an individual could be identified from only 36 (15%)....

Registration Year

  • 2018
    34

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    34

Affiliations

  • University of Turku
    34
  • University of Helsinki
    9
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    5
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    3
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    3
  • Uppsala University
    3
  • University of Oviedo
    2
  • University of Eastern Finland
    2
  • Estonian University of Life Sciences
    2
  • Lund University
    2