26 Works

Dataset, posterior summaries and posterior samples for quantifying fluctuating selection on seasonal migration versus residence in European shags

Sarah Burthe, Paul Acker, Francis Daunt & Jane Reid
This dataset is associated with the manuscript Episodes of opposing survival and reproductive selection cause strong fluctuating selection on seasonal migration versus residence. Quantifying temporal variation in sex-specific selection on key ecologically relevant traits, and quantifying how such variation arises through synergistic or opposing components of survival and reproductive selection, is central to understanding eco-evolutionary dynamics but rarely achieved. Seasonal migration versus residence is one key trait that directly shapes spatio-seasonal population dynamics in spatially-...

Moving out of town? The status of alien plants in high-Arctic Svalbard, and a method for monitoring of alien flora in high-risk, polar environments

Jesamine Bartlett, Kristine Bakke-Westergaard, Ingrid Paulsen, Ronja Wedegartner, Florian Wilken & Virve Ravolainen
Rising human activity in the Arctic, combined with a warming climate, increases the probability of the introduction and establishment of alien plant species. While settlements are known hotspots for persistent populations, little is known about colonization of particularly susceptible natural habitats. Systematic monitoring is lacking and available survey methods vary greatly. Here we present the most comprehensive survey of alien vascular plant species in the high-Arctic archipelago of Svalbard to date, aimed at: i) providing...

Spatial structure and dispersal dynamics in a house sparrow metapopulation

Peter S. Ranke, Peter S. Ranke, Yimen Araya-Ajoy, Thor Harald Ringsby, Henrik Pärn, Bernt Rønning, Henrik Jensen, Jonathan Wright & Bernt-Erik Sæther
1. The effects of spatial structure on metapopulation dynamics depend upon the interaction between local population dynamics and dispersal, and how this relationship is affected by the geographical isolation and spatial heterogeneity in habitat characteristics. 2. Our aim is to examine how emigration and immigration of house sparrows, Passer domesticus, in a Norwegian archipelagic metapopulation are affected by key factors predicted by classic metapopulation models to affect dispersal: spatial and temporal variation in population size,...

Data for: Are immigrants outbred and unrelated? Testing standard assumptions in a wild metapopulation

Lisa Dickel, Peter Arcese, Pirmin Nietlisbach, Lukas Keller & Jane Reid
Immigration into small recipient populations is expected to alleviate inbreeding and increase genetic variation, and hence facilitate population persistence through genetic and/or evolutionary rescue. Such expectations depend on three standard assumptions: that immigrants are outbred, unrelated to existing natives at arrival, and unrelated to each other. These assumptions are rarely explicitly verified, including in key field systems in evolutionary ecology. Yet, they could be violated due to non-random or repeated immigration from adjacent small populations....

Experience-dependent plasticity modulates ongoing activity in the antennal lobe and enhances odor representations

Luis Franco & Emre Yaksi
Ongoing neural activity has been observed across several brain regions and is thought to reflect the internal state of the brain. Yet, it is important to understand how ongoing neural activity interacts with sensory experience, and shapes sensory representations. Here, we show that projection neurons of the fruit fly antennal lobe exhibit spatiotemporally organized ongoing activity. After repeated exposure to odors, we observe a gradual and cumulative decrease in the amplitude and number of calcium...

Data from: Species interactions, environmental gradients and body size shape population niche width

Antti Eloranta, Anders Finstad, Odd Sandlund, Rune Knudsen, Anna Kuparinen & Per-Arne Amundsen
Competition for shared resources is commonly assumed to restrict population-level niche width of coexisting species. However, the identity and abundance of coexisting species, the prevailing environmental conditions, and the individual body size may shape the effects of interspecific interactions on species’ niche width. Here we study the effects of inter- and intraspecific interactions, lake area and altitude, and fish body size on the trophic niche width and resource use of a generalist predator, the littoral-dwelling...

Cytotype and genotype predict mortality and recruitment in Colorado quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides)

Benjamin Blonder, Courtenay Ray, James Walton, Marco Castaneda, K. Dana Chadwick, Michael Clyne, Pierre Gaüzere, Lars Iversen, Madison Lusk, G. Richard Strimbeck, Savannah Troy & Karen Mock
Species responses to climate change depend on environment, genetics, and interactions among these factors. Intraspecific cytotype (ploidy level) variation is a common type of genetic variation in many species. However, the importance of intraspecific cytotype variation in determining demography across environments is poorly known. We studied the tree species quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), which occurs in diploid and triploid cytotypes. This widespread species is experiencing contractions in its western range, which could potentially be linked...

Data and scripts for: Quantitative assessment of observed vs. predicted responses to selection

Christophe Pelabon, Elena Albertsen, Arnaud Le Rouzic, Cyril Firmat, Geir H. Bolstad, W. Scott Armbruster & Thomas Hansen
Although artificial-selection experiments seem well suited to testing our ability to predict evolution, the correspondence between predicted and observed responses is often ambiguous due to the lack of uncertainty estimates. We present equations for assessing prediction error in direct and indirect responses to selection that integrate uncertainty in genetic parameters used for prediction and sampling effects during selection. Using these, we analyzed a selection experiment on floral traits replicated in two taxa of the Dalechampia...

Effects of population density on static allometry between horn length and body mass in mountain ungulates

Christophe Pelabon, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Steeve Côté, Carole Toigo, Mathieu Garel & Anne Loison
Little is known about the effects of environmental variation on allometric relationships of condition-dependent traits, especially in wild populations. We estimated sex-specific static allometry between horn length and body mass in four populations of mountain ungulates that experienced periods of contrasting density over the course of the study. These species displayed contrasting sexual dimorphism in horn size; high dimorphism in Capra ibex and Ovis canadensis and low dimorphism in Rupicapra rupicapra and Oreamnos americanus. The...

Do genetic differences in growth thermal reaction norms maintain genetic variation in timing of diapause induction?

Erlend Fossen, Joost Raeymaekers & Sigurd Einum
An optimal timing for diapause induction through the sexual production of dormant propagules is expected in organisms with temporary populations. Yet, empirical studies often find high within-population genetic variation in the sexual production of such propagules, suggesting that this is a common feature of such organisms. Here, we hypothesize that genetic variation in the propensity to produce dormant propagules, Pd, is maintained by a genotype-by-environment interaction in clonal reproductive rates, where fast-growing genotypes within an...

Data from: Ongoing habenular activity is driven by forebrain networks and modulated by olfactory stimuli

Emre Yaksi, Ewelina Magdalena Bartoszek, Anna Maria Ostenrath, Suresh Kumar Jetti, Bram Serneels, Aytac Kadir Mutlu & Khac Thanh Phong Chau
The data was collected using volumetric two-photon calcium imaging of the forebrain and habenula of juvenile zebrafish expressing a transgenic calcium indicator. The data provided is organized according to the figures of our manuscript and contains the necessary codes and data to replicate the figures presented. In short, included repository contains 6 datasets of experiments. Data structure includes neuronal data as normalised to the baseline fluorescence for each neuron over time (DF/F), 2 or 3...

Data from: Model-based ordination for species with unequal niche widths

Bert Van Der Veen, Francis K.C. Hui, Knut A. Hovstad, Erik B. Solbu & Robert B. O'Hara
It is common practice for ecologists to examine species niches in the study of community composition. The response curve of a species in the fundamental niche is usually assumed to be quadratic. The center of a quadratic curve represents a species' optimal environmental conditions, and the width its ability to tolerate deviations from the optimum. Most multivariate methods assume species respond linearly to the environment of the niche, or with a quadratic curve that is...

Body mass measurements of wild boar from two French populations

Lara Veylit
Despite the importance of body growth in shaping life history tactics and population dynamics, exploring individual growth trajectories in the wild remains challenging. Here, we quantified wild boar growth trajectories at both the population and the individual levels using standard growth models (i.e. Gompertz, logistic, and monomolecular models) that encompass the expected range of growth shapes. According to current theories of life history evolution, we expect wild boar to display a sex-specific Gompertz type growth...

Fitness and fur colouration - testing the camouflage and thermoregulation hypotheses in an Arctic mammal

Cecilia Di Bernardi, Anne-Mathilde Thierry, Nina E. Eide, Diana E. Bowler, Lars Rød-Eriksen, Stefan Blumentrath, Lukas Tietgen, Brett Sandercock, Øystein Flagstad & Arild Landa
1. Selection for crypsis has been recognised as an important ecological driver of animal coloration, whereas the relative importance of thermoregulation is more contentious with mixed empirical support. A potential thermal advantage of darker individuals has been observed in a wide range of animal species. Arctic animals that exhibit colour polymorphisms and undergo seasonal colour moults are interesting study subjects for testing the two alternative hypotheses: demographic performance of different colour morphs might be differentially...

Molecular dietary analyses of western capercaillies (Tetrao urogallus) reveal a diverse diet

Physilia Chua, Youri Lammers, Emmanuel Menoni, Torbjørn Ekrem, Kristine Bohmann, Sanne Boessenkool & Inger Alsos
Conservation strategies centred around species habitat protection rely on species’ dietary information. One species at the focal point of conservation efforts is the herbivorous grouse, the western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), which is an indicator species for forest biodiversity conservation. Non-molecular means used to study their diet are time-consuming and at low taxonomic resolution. This delays the implementation of conservation strategies including resource protection due to uncertainty about its diet. Thus, limited knowledge on diet is...

Incubation temperature and physiological aging in the zebra finch

Claus Bech & Johan Henrik Berntsen
In birds, incubation temperature has received increased attention as an important source of phenotypic variability in offspring. A lower than optimal incubation temperature may negatively affect aspects of nestling physiology, such as body growth and energy metabolism. However, the long-term effects of sub-optimal incubation temperature on morphology and physiology are not well understood. In a previous study, we showed that zebra finches from eggs incubated at a low temperature (35.9°C) for 2/3 of the total...

Images obtained by fluorescence microscopy technique for monitoring diffusion of PI molecules into pressure-treated Listeria monocytogenes cells

Bahareh Nikparvar, Alicia Subires, Marta Capellas, Manuela Hernandez-Herrero, Peter Crauwels, Christian U. Riedel & Nadav Bar
The effect of environmental stresses on microorganisms is well studied and cellular response to stresses such as heat, cold, acids, and salts was extensively discussed. Although high pressure processing (HPP) as a preservation method is becoming more popular in the food industry, the characteristics of the cellular damage caused by high pressure are unclear, and the microbial response to this stress is not well explored yet. We exposed the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to HPP (400...

The effect of temperature on appetite in fish

Fredrik Jutfelt, Tommy Norin, Eirik Åsheim, Lauren Rowsey, Anna Andreassen, Rachael Morgan, Timothy Clark & Ben Speers-Roesch
Temperature has a dramatic effect on the physiology of ectothermic animals, impacting most of their biology. When temperatures increase above optimal for an animal, their growth gradually decreases. The main mechanism behind this growth rate reduction is unknown. Here, we suggest the ‘aerobic scope protection’ hypothesis as a mechanistic explanation for the reduction in growth. After a meal, metabolic rate, and hence oxygen consumption rate, transiently increases in a process called specific dynamic action (SDA)....

Efficient use of harvest data: A size-class-structured integrated population model for exploited populations

Marlène Gamelon, Chloé R. Nater, Eric Baubet, Aurelien Besnard, Laura Touzot, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Jean-Dominique Lebreton & Olivier Gimenez
Many animal populations are subject to hunting or fishing in the wild. Detailed knowledge of demographic parameters (e.g. survival, reproduction) and temporal dynamics of such populations is crucial for sustainable management. Despite their relevance for management decisions, structure and size of exploited populations are often not known, and data limited. Recently, joint analysis of different types of demographic data, such as population counts, reproductive data and capture-mark-recapture data, within integrated population models (IPMs) has gained...

Herbivores reduce seedling recruitment in alpine plant communities

Øystein H. Opedal, Kristin Nystuen, Dagmar Hagen, Håkon Holien, Mia Sørensen, Simone Lang, Sigrid Lindmo, G. RIchard Strimbeck & Bente Graae
Through changes in climate and other environmental factors, alpine tundra ecosystems are subject to increased cover of erect shrubs, reduced predictability of rodent dynamics, and changes in wild and domesticated herbivore densities. To predict the dynamics of these ecosystems, we need to understand how these simultaneous changes affect alpine vegetation. In the long term, vegetation dynamics may depend critically on seedling recruitment. To study drivers of alpine plant seedling recruitment, we set up a field...

Data from: Dispersal in a house sparrow metapopulation: an integrative case study of genetic assignment calibrated with ecological data and pedigree information

Dilan Saatoglu, Alina K. Niskanen, Markku Kuismin, Peter S. Ranke, Ingerid J. Hagen, Yimen G. Araya-Ajoy, Thomas Kvalnes, Henrik Pärn, Bernt Rønning, Thor Harald Ringsby, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Arild Husby, Mikko J. Sillanpää & Henrik Jensen
Dispersal has a crucial role determining eco-evolutionary dynamics through both gene flow and population size regulation. However, to study dispersal and its consequences, one must distinguish immigrants from residents. Dispersers can be identified using telemetry, capture-mark-recapture (CMR) methods, or genetic assignment methods. All of these methods have disadvantages, such as, high costs and substantial field efforts needed for telemetry and CMR surveys, and adequate genetic distance required in genetic assignment. In this study, we used...

Data from: Host-parasite dynamics shaped by temperature and genotype: quantifying the role of underlying vital rates

Marjolein Bruijning, Erlend Fossen, Eelke Jongejans, Héléne Vanvelk, Joost Raeymaekers, Lynn Govaert, Kristien Brans, Sigurd Einum & Luc De Meester
1. Global warming challenges the persistence of local populations, not only through heat-induced stress, but also through indirect biotic changes. We study the interactive effects of temperature, competition and parasitism in the water flea Daphnia magna. 2. We carried out a common garden experiment monitoring the dynamics of Daphnia populations along a temperature gradient. Halfway through the experiment, all populations became infected with the ectoparasite Amoebidium parasiticum, enabling us to study interactive effects of temperature...

Tetragnatha kauaiensis genome

José Cerca
Spiders (Araneae) have a diverse spectrum of morphologies, behaviours and physiologies. Initial attempts to understand the genomic-basis of this diversity are hindered by their large, heterozygous and AT-rich genomes with high repeat content resulting in highly fragmented, poor-quality assemblies. As a result, spider genomes’ key attributes, including gene family evolution, repeat content, and gene function, remain poorly understood. Here, we used Illumina and Dovetail Chicago technologies to sequence the genome of the long jawed spider...

Data from: On the comparative biology of mammalian telomeres: telomere length co-evolves with body mass, lifespan and cancer risk

Michael Le Pepke & Dan T. A. Eisenberg
Telomeres, the short repetitive DNA sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes, shorten during cell division and are implicated in senescence in most species. Telomerase can rebuild telomeres but is repressed in many mammals that exhibit replicative senescence, presumably as a tumor suppression mechanism. It is therefore important to understand the co-evolution of telomere biology and life-history traits that has shaped the diversity of senescence patterns across species. Gomes et al. (2011) produced a...

European shag provisioning foraging dives

Astrid Carlsen, Jonathan Wright & Svein-Håkon Lorentsen
Foraging dives in birds and mammals involve complex physiological and behavioural adaptations to cope with the breaks in normal respiration. Optimal dive strategies should maximise the proportion of time spent under water actively foraging versus the time spent on the surface. Oxygen loading and carbon-dioxide dumping carried out on the surface could involve recovery from the consequences of the last dive and/or preparation in anticipation of the next dive depth and duration. However, few studies...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    26

Affiliations

  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    26
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    8
  • Nord University
    3
  • Uppsala University
    3
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
    2
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Utah State University
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1