241 Works

The Race Equality Directive: A Shadow Report

Costanza Hermanin & Eefje de Kroon
The Race Equality Directive: A Shadow Report collects lessons learned from the implementation of the Race Equality Directive in nine European Union member states. The Race Equality Directive is a piece of legislation adopted in 2000 by the Council of Ministers of the European Union implementing the principle of equality for all irrespective of racial or ethnic origin. The directive comes under review at the end of 2013, 10 years after its entry into force....

Strategic Litigation Impacts: Equal Access to Quality Education

Ann Skelton
The UN’s Sustainable Development Goals include a commitment to “ensuring inclusive and quality education for all”—a recognition by the governments of the world that a child’s right to education is one of the keys to unlocking global human and economic development. That right is protected by multiple human rights norms and treaties. But inadequate state spending and discrimination prevent millions from going to school, while keeping others trapped in substandard schools without textbooks, adequately trained...

Shrinking the Space for Denial: The Impact of the ICTY in Serbia

Diane F. Orentlicher
This groundbreaking report published by the Open Society Justice Initiative examines the impact in Serbia of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). Shrinking the Space for Denial: The Impact of the ICTY in Serbia is the most comprehensive analysis to date of the court's impact in a country directly affected by its work. The report by Diane Orentlicher, professor of international law at American University's Washington College of Law and special counsel...

Muslims in Hamburg

Andreas Hieronymus
"We have integrated into society very well, but now it is the time when society has to incorporate us." —Open Society Foundations focus group respondent, Hamburg Through engagement with policymakers and communities, Muslims in Hamburg examines the political, social, and economic participation of Muslim communities living in Hamburg, Germany—a city known for its long history of immigration and where inter-religious dialogue and inclusion form a visible part of the daily life of the city. The...

Muslims in Copenhagen

Mustafa Hussain, Lene Timm & John Andersen
"The one thing that can make a real difference is legislation. And this is what has been a major problem. By legislation I mean politicians and people with a high standing in society—if they together could just understand what it is to be a Muslim in Denmark or what it is to come from a visually identifiable ethnic minority." —Focus group respondent Through engagement with policymakers and communities, Muslims in Copenhagen examines the needs and...

On the Margins: Roma and Public Services in Romania, Bulgaria, and Macedonia

Ina Zoon
A report on the status of Roma in three Balkan countries, focusing on improving Romani access to social protection, health care, and housing. Also included is a supplement on Roma housing in the Czech Republic.

Muslims in Berlin

Nina Mühe
“I feel German because I speak the language and have adopted the culture. Yet I also feel I am Russian and Kazakh and Ukrainian and Muslim. I feel good about all of these identities.” These words were spoken by one of the 300 residents who participated in Muslims in Berlin—the second of 11 city reports to be produced this year by the Open Society At Home in Europe Project. It is a result of research...

A Balancing Act: Policymaking on Illicit Drugs in the Czech Republic

Joanne Csete
In the early post-Soviet period, Czech authorities, unlike their counterparts in some former Eastern Bloc countries, turned away from repressive drug policies and developed approaches to illicit drugs that balanced new freedoms with state authority. The end of Soviet rule meant that drug markets and the use of a wide range of new drugs attained a magnitude and visibility not previously known to Czech society. From an early stage, some pioneering health professionals with expertise...

Untangling the Web: A Blueprint for Reforming American Security Sector Assistance

Rose Jackson
Since the attacks of 9/11, the United States has spent more than $250 billion building up military and police forces around the world. From attempts to build whole armies in Iraq and Afghanistan to efforts to help Yemen or Nigeria fight terrorism, the impact of these efforts has been mixed and in some cases counterproductive, exacerbating local corruption, human rights abuses, and even terrorism. A knot of U.S. offices and agencies have evolved to provide...

White Working Class Communities in Aarhus

Per Mouritsen & Anders Bo Bojesen
This report is part of a six-city research series titled Europe’s White Working Class Communities, which examines the realities of people from majority populations in Aarhus, Amsterdam, Berlin, Lyon, Manchester, and Stockholm. White Working Class Communities in Aarhus explores the views and experiences of the majority population in Trigeparken, a public housing community in Aarhus. The report focuses on six areas of local policy—education, employment, housing, health and social protection, policing and security, and civil...

White Working Class Communities in Lyon

Derek Pierre Christie
This report is part of a six-city research series, Europe’s White Working Class Communities, which examines the realities of people from majority populations in Aarhus, Amsterdam, Berlin, Lyon, Manchester, and Stockholm. White Working Class Communities in Lyon explores the views and experiences of the majority population in the 8th arrondissement (borough) of Lyon, a diverse and dense area, and socially and economically one of the most challenged areas in the city. Given that in France...

White Working Class Communities in Amsterdam

Saskia Welschen
This report is part of a six-city research series, Europe’s White Working Class Communities, which examines the realities of people from majority populations in Aarhus, Amsterdam, Berlin, Lyon, Manchester, and Stockholm. White Working Class Communities in Amsterdam explores the experiences and concerns of segments of the majority population in the borough of Amsterdam-North, in the neighborhoods of Tuindorp Buiksloot and Floradorp. Both began as housing projects for working class people in the early 20th century....

Unveiling the Truth: Why 32 Muslim Women Wear the Full-Face Veil in France

Naima Bouteldja
Following a period of intense public debate, legislation banning the face veil in France came into effect on April 11, 2011. This report from the At Home in Europe Project aims to distinguish myths and misrepresentations surrounding women who wear the full-face veil from the actual experiences and testimonies of the women themselves, by reporting on the women’s backgrounds, their decisions to wear the veil, their daily experiences in public, and their views on the...

Women, Harm Reduction, and HIV

Sophie Pinkham & Kasia Malinowska-Sempruch
For women who inject drugs, the stigma of injection drug use is added to gendered discrimination; these factors combined can push women into behaviors that increase their risk of HIV, according to this report published by the International Harm Reduction Development Program. There is a higher likelihood that women drug users will provide sex in exchange for housing, sustenance, and protection; suffer violence from sexual partners; and have difficulty insisting that their sexual partners use...

States of Change: Attitudes in Central and Eastern Europe 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall

Lan Bui-Wrzosinska
Despite deep concerns about the future of democracy, people in Central and Eastern Europe retain a strong attachment to civil society and faith in the freedoms achieved with the collapse of Communism, according to States of Change: Attitudes in Central and Eastern Europe 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall, a report from the Open Society Foundations. Based on polling by YouGov conducted in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and...

Strengthening from Within: Law and Practice in the Selection of Human Rights Judges and Commissioners

Christian M. De Vos, Roisin Pillay & Matt Pollard
Regional human rights courts and commissions—including the African Court of Human and Peoples’ Rights, the European Court of Human Rights, and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights—are essential safeguards for the rule of law. Yet despite their importance, the process of selecting the judges and commissioners who sit on these bodies—how they are nominated, vetted, and ultimately selected—remains largely unknown and often shrouded in secrecy. Coupled with broader political efforts to erode international judicial institutions,...

Playing by the Rules: Using Intellectual Property Law and Policy to Improve Access to Essential Medicines

Jeff Hoover
This OSI publication documents developments in the use of intellectual property law and policy in six countries: South Africa, Thailand, Brazil, the Philippines, Rwanda, and Kenya. Playing by the Rules: Using Intellectual Property Law and Policy to Improve Access to Essential Medicines highlights options that policymakers and civil society might pursue to reduce the prices of medicines and thereby improve availability.

On the Road to the EU: Monitoring Equal Opportunities for Women and Men in Albania

Artur Metani & Sonila Omari
Albania is preparing for eventual EU membership and is in the midst of bringing its legal framework in compliance with the requirements of EU directives and guidelines. In regard to gender equality, Albanian legislation has generally met priorities established in the Stabilization and Association Process (SAP) with the European Union. However, as the following report details, implementation of these laws faces major hurdles. In recent years, significant progress has been made in developing national legislation...

Muslims in Paris

Valerie Amiraux
“This neighbourhood has always been a neighbourhood of arrivals; people who come and are in need, trying to move into a more welcoming neighbourhood.” —Focus group respondent Muslims in Paris highlights the everyday experiences and rarely heard voices of Muslims living in the neighbourhood of La Goutte d’Or, situated in Paris’ multicultural 18th arrondissement. The qualitative research reveals that both Muslim and non-Muslim residents share a keen sense of belonging to their neighbourhood, city and...

No Health, No Help: Abuse as Drug Rehabilitation in Latin America & the Caribbean

Denise Tomasini-Joshi & Roxanne Saucier
Chaining, public humiliation, abduction, and prayer. If these were treatments offered for diabetes or heart disease, we would see them as cruel and abusive. Yet these are tactics used widely in centers for the “treatment and rehabilitation” of people who use drugs in Latin America and the Caribbean. These abusive centers often operate unlawfully and without medical or governmental supervision. People are often brought to these centers against their will, by family members, by police,...

No Data—No Progress: Country Findings

Katy Negrin
The year 2010 marks the halfway point of the Decade of Roma Inclusion. It is a logical place for the 12 participating Decade countries to assess their progress to date so they can ensure that their initiatives are on track and are effective, and that conditions for the 4.5 million Roma who live in these countries are improving. By evaluating their efforts, governments would demonstrate their seriousness and commitment to the political pledges they made...

Muslims in the UK: Policies for Engaged Citizens

Zamila Bunglawala, Basia Spalek, Mark Halstead & Maleiha Malik
Greater government recognition of the needs of British Muslims is required to tackle the disadvantage, deprivation, and discrimination that this community faces, says the OSI report Muslims in the UK: Policies for Engaged Citizens. Presenting new analysis and data, the report, published by OSI's EU Monitoring and Advocacy Program, makes the case that religion is a more important aspect of identity than ethnicity for British Muslims. Currently both data collection and government policy too often...

Mapping Digital Media: Romania

Manuela Preoteasa, Iulian Comanescu & Ioana Avadani
The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs. Romania was hit hard by the economic crisis of 2008–2009, which slowed the remarkable growth of its television, print, and online sectors over the previous decade. Moreover, with...

Mapping Digital Media: Pakistan

Huma Yusuf
The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs. Pakistan has long suffered from high inflation, led by soaring food prices, which has increased poverty levels. According to the United Nations’ 2011 Human Development Report, half the...

Mapping Digital Media: The Media and Liability for Content on the Internet

Cynthia Wong & James X. Dempsey
The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs. This paper provides an overview of content liability on the internet, with a focus on the risks to human rights as governments claim extended authority over this unique,...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    241

Resource Types

  • Report
    241

Affiliations

  • Open Society Foundations
    241
  • Carleton University
    1
  • University of Calgary
    1
  • York University
    1