5 Works

Ivan Karamazov’s Euclidean Mind: the ‘Fact’ of Human Suffering and Evil

Kimberly Young
In The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky addresses the problem of how to reconcile God’s goodness with the evil in the world by comparing the metaphysical implications of Ivan Karamazov’s and the Elder Zosima’s Euclidean and non-Euclidean epistemologies. For Ivan, the moral opposites of good and evil cannot be reconciled, just as two parallel lines cannot meet (Euclid’s fifth postulate). For Zosima, the symbol of the crucifix represents a meeting of the parallel lines and the...

Rural and regional mobilities: exploring the impact of (im)mobilities on rural and regional communities [summary report]

David Radford, Raelene Wilding, Anthony Moran & Martina Boese

Abstraction through the Merger of Iconic Elements in Forming New Allographs: The Logogram 539

Sven Gronemeyer
One contributor to the calligraphic complexity of Classic Maya writing is the ability afforded by the script to create allographs. There are examples with multiple stages of extraction and simplification to create allographs. In order to create a unique graph, distinctive parts of the feline WAY icon are merged into the well-known allograph with its right half covered in jaguar fur, although both allographs represent the very same sign.

Shedding New Light on the Maya Stela from Hix Witz in Stuttgart

Christian M. Prager, Sven Gronemeyer & Elisabeth Wagner
A Maya stela with a hieroglyphic text and a portrayal of a Maya ruler that is now in the collections of the Linden Museum in Stuttgart, Germany (inventory no. M 30751), has received scant attention from scholars to date 1). This stela is the focus of current research by the authors as members of the project “Text Database and Dictionary of Classic Mayan”, who have been collaborating with Doris Kurella of the Linden Museum since...

A Fresh Breeze in the Palace: The Courtly Function of the Yok Waal

Sven Gronemeyer
The present note is about a very rare lexeme in the epigraphic record: waal ‘fan’. Among the handful of examples, a unique context on the polychrome ceramic vessel K2914, the famous Denver Art Museum vase, allows identification of a hitherto unrecognized courtly function: yok waal as the ‘fan-bearer’ or ‘fan-wielder’.

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  • La Trobe University
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